Grade 10 Canadian History

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| By Stthomas57
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Stthomas57
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Quizzes Created: 1 | Total Attempts: 659
Questions: 20 | Attempts: 659

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Grade 10 Canadian History - Quiz

Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    Which country took control of Quebec away from France, by winning the battle of the Plains of Abraham?  

    • A.

      Britain

    • B.

      Germany

    • C.

      Russia

    Correct Answer
    A. Britain
    Explanation
    Britain took control of Quebec away from France by winning the battle of the Plains of Abraham. This battle took place during the Seven Years' War in 1759, and it resulted in the British victory over the French forces. As a result, Britain gained control over Quebec and eventually expanded its colonial empire in North America.

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  • 2. 

    What was the name of the passage the Aboriginals crossed to get to North America?

    Correct Answer
    Bering Strait
    Bering
    bering strait
    bering
    Beringue
    beringue
    Explanation
    The Bering Strait is a strait 82 kilometers wide at its narrowest point. The Strait has been the subject of scientific speculation that humans migrated from Asia to North America across a land bridge known as Beringia when lower ocean levels – perhaps a result of glaciers locking up vast amounts of water – exposed a wide stretch of the sea floor, both at the present strait and in the shallow sea north and south of it.

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  • 3. 

    What were the years of Cartier's three voyages to New France?

    • A.

      1534, 1535, 1541

    • B.

      1533, 1537, 1542

    • C.

      1534, 1535, 1540

    • D.

      1540, 1544, 1546

    Correct Answer
    A. 1534, 1535, 1541
    Explanation
    The correct answer is 1534, 1535, 1541. This is the correct answer because Cartier made three voyages to New France during these years. The years 1534 and 1535 were his first and second voyages, during which he explored the Gulf of St. Lawrence and the St. Lawrence River. The year 1541 was his third voyage, during which he established a settlement called Charlesbourg-Royal, which was later abandoned.

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  • 4. 

    True or false, Cartier's main objectives for travelling to New France were to discover a passage to Asia, claim land, and bring back Natives for the King.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    B. False
    Explanation
    Cartier's objectives were to make contact with the Natives, not bring them back, as well as claim land for France, find a passage to Asia, and return with precious gems, spices, materials, etc

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  • 5. 

    Who are the women in this picture?

    Correct Answer
    Filles du Roi
    filles du roi
    king's daughters
    King's Daughters
    Filles du Roy
    Les filles du roi
    les filles du roy
    Explanation
    The Filles du Roi (King's Daughters) is a term used to refer to the approximately 800 young French women who immigrated to New France between 1663 and 1673 as part of a program sponsored by Louis XIV. The program was designed to boost Canada's population both by encouraging male immigrants to settle there, and by promoting marriage, family formation and the birth of children.

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  • 6. 

    True or False? Jean Talon was the founder of what we now call Quebec City.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    B. False
    Explanation
    Samuel de Champlain founded what is now known as Quebec City in 1608

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  • 7. 

    What was the robed man in this photo's role in New France?

    • A.

      To send messages back and forth between the European settlers and the Natives

    • B.

      To trade with the Natives

    • C.

      To convert the Natives

    • D.

      To marry Native couples

    Correct Answer
    C. To convert the Natives
    Explanation
    The Jesuits were priests sent over to New France to convert the Natives. Many of them were killed in the attempt and are known as "martyrs."

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  • 8. 

    Who was the first Intendant of New France?

    • A.

      Samuel de Champlain

    • B.

      Jacques Cartier

    • C.

      Louis XIV

    • D.

      Jean Talon

    Correct Answer
    D. Jean Talon
    Explanation
    The Intendant of New France was an administrative position in the French colony of New France. He controlled the colony's entire civil administration. Jean Talon was the first Intendant, appointed in 1665

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  • 9. 

    Which province was the last to join the Confederation? 

    • A.

      Newfoundland

    • B.

      Ontario

    • C.

      Manitoba

    • D.

      Nova Scotia

    Correct Answer
    A. Newfoundland
    Explanation
    Newfoundland is the correct answer because it was the last province to join the Confederation. Newfoundland was not one of the original four provinces to join in 1867. It remained as a separate British colony until it joined Canada on March 31, 1949, becoming the tenth province of Canada.

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  • 10. 

     The members of which ethnic group were once forced to pay a head tax to immigrate to Canada? 

    • A.

      Chinese

    • B.

      African Americans

    • C.

      Aboriginals

    Correct Answer
    A. Chinese
    Explanation
    The Chinese head tax was a fixed fee charged to each Chinese person entering Canada. The head tax was first levied after the Canadian parliament passed the Chinese Immigration Act of 1885 and was meant to discourage Chinese people from entering Canada after the completion of the Canadian Pacific Railway. The tax was abolished by the Chinese Immigration Act of 1923, which stopped all Chinese immigration except for business people, clergy, educators, students, and other categories.

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  • 11. 

      What is the name of the Metis leader who was hanged by the federal government in 1885? 

    • A.

      Pontiac

    • B.

      Christopher Colombus

    • C.

      Louis Riel

    Correct Answer
    C. Louis Riel
    Explanation
    Louis David Riel was a Canadian politician, a founder of the province of Manitoba, and a political and spiritual leader of the Métis people of the Canadian prairies. He led two resistance movements against the Canadian government and its first post-Confederation prime minister, Sir John A. Macdonald. Riel sought to preserve Métis rights and culture as their homelands in the Northwest came progressively under the Canadian sphere of influence.

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  • 12. 

    What term is commonly used to refer to early French fur traders in Canada?  

    • A.

      Loyalists

    • B.

      Voyageurs

    • C.

      Entrepeneurs

    Correct Answer
    B. Voyageurs
    Explanation
    Voyageurs is the correct answer because it is the term commonly used to refer to early French fur traders in Canada. These voyageurs were skilled canoeists and fur traders who played a crucial role in the fur trade industry during the 17th and 18th centuries. They were known for their extensive travels across the Canadian wilderness, navigating rivers and lakes to transport furs and goods. The term "voyageur" comes from the French word "voyage," meaning journey or travel, which accurately describes the nature of their work.

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  • 13. 

    What was the group of American settlers who immigrated to Canada after the American Revolution?

    Correct Answer
    Loyalists
    loyalists
    the loyalists
    Explanation
    Loyalists were American colonists who remained loyal to the British Empire and the British monarchy during the American Revolutionary War. When their cause was defeated, about 15% of the Loyalists or 65,000–70,000 fled to other parts of the British Empire, in Britain or elsewhere in British North America.

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  • 14. 

    Which of the following were original provinces of Canada, after Confederation?  Check as many as apply.

    • A.

      Manitoba

    • B.

      Ontario

    • C.

      Quebec

    • D.

      New Brunswick

    • E.

      Nova Scotia

    Correct Answer(s)
    B. Ontario
    C. Quebec
    D. New Brunswick
    E. Nova Scotia
    Explanation
    After Confederation, the original provinces of Canada were Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia. These provinces were established as part of the Dominion of Canada in 1867. Manitoba was not one of the original provinces, as it joined later in 1870.

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  • 15. 

    Who was Canada's first Prime Minister (last name only)?

    Correct Answer(s)
    Macdonald
    Explanation
    Sir John Alexander Macdonald was the first Prime Minister of Canada (1867–1873, 1878–1891) and one of Canada's Fathers of Confederation. The dominant figure of Canadian Confederation, he had a political career which spanned almost half a century. Macdonald served 19 years as Canadian Prime Minister; only William Lyon Mackenzie King served longer.

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  • 16. 

    In which year did Confederation take place?

    Correct Answer(s)
    1867
    Explanation
    Canadian Confederation was the process by which the federal Dominion of Canada was formed on July 1, 1867. On that day, three British colonies became four provinces of the new dominion. The existing United Province of Canada was divided into the new provinces of Ontario and Quebec, and two other colonies, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, also became provinces of the new Dominion of Canada.

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  • 17. 

    What did the king of France offer to the Company of 100 Associates in exchange for colonizing New France?

    Correct Answer(s)
    Monopoly on the fur trade
    fur trade monopoly
    monopoly
    control over the fur trade
    Explanation
    The Company of One Hundred Associates was a French trading and colonization company chartered in 1627 to capitalize on the North American fur trade and to expand French colonies there. The company was granted a monopoly to manage the fur trade in the colonies of New France, which were at that time centered on the Saint Lawrence River valley and the Gulf of Saint Lawrence. In return the company was supposed to settle French Catholics in New Colonies.

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  • 18. 

    What is another name for Confederation?

    • A.

      Act of Union

    • B.

      The British North America Act

    • C.

      Canadian Foundation

    • D.

      Canada Day

    Correct Answer
    B. The British North America Act
    Explanation
    The British North America Act is another name for Confederation because it was the legislation passed by the British Parliament in 1867 that united the provinces of Canada, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia into a single Dominion called Canada. This act established the framework for the Canadian federal system and granted Canada a significant degree of autonomy from Britain. It is considered a landmark event in Canadian history and is often referred to as Confederation.

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  • 19. 

    What was the main goal of the Quebec Act in 1774?

    • A.

      To assimilate the Canadiens

    • B.

      A reciprocal trade alliance with the Canadiens

    • C.

      To separate Quebec from Canada

    • D.

      To conciliate the Canadiens

    Correct Answer
    D. To conciliate the Canadiens
    Explanation
    The Quebec Act of 1774 was an Act of the Parliament of Great Britain setting procedures of governance in the Province of Quebec. Among other components, this act restored the use of the French civil law for private matters while maintaining the use of the English common law for public administration (including criminal prosecution), replaced the oath of allegiance so that it no longer made reference to the Protestant faith, and guaranteed free practice of the Catholic faith. The purpose of this Act was to secure the allegiance of the French Canadians with unrest growing in the American colonies to the south.

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  • Current Version
  • Mar 21, 2023
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team
  • Oct 29, 2014
    Quiz Created by
    Stthomas57
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