Houser,Nursing Research: Chapter 5 & 6 Vocabulary Quiz

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Houser,Nursing Research: Chapter 5 & 6 Vocabulary Quiz

Nursing Research: Reading, Using, and Creating Evidence 3rd edition-Janet Houser*Chapters 5 & 6 Vocabulary quiz*


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Bibliometrics
    • A. 

      The science of publication patterns

    • B. 

      Published works that demonstrate how theories apply to individual behavior or observed events.

    • C. 

      A search that finds articles that cited another article.

  • 2. 
    Boolean operators
    • A. 

      A pyramid diagram illustrating evidence-based information that depicts the potential quality of information, the amount available, and the amount of searching required to find evidence.

    • B. 

      Published works that demonstrate how theories apply to individual behavior or observed events.

    • C. 

      The words AND, OR, NOT used to join or exclude search terms.

  • 3. 
    Citing-articles search
    • A. 

      A way to measure visibility of research by calculating a ratio of current citations of the journal to all the citations in the same time period

    • B. 

      The competencies necessary to access, retrieve, and analyze research evidence for application to nursing practice.

    • C. 

      A search that finds articles that cited another article.

    • D. 

      A critical component of the research process that provides an in-depth analysis of recently published research findings in specifically identified areas of interest. The review informs the research question and guides development of the research plan.

  • 4. 
    Empirical litterature
    • A. 

      Published works that demonstrate how theories apply to individual behavior or observed events.

    • B. 

      Major ideas or themes in a research question.

    • C. 

      Research designed to quantify the strength and the direction of the relationship of two variables in a single subject or the relationship between a single variable in two samples.

    • D. 

      The science of publication patterns

  • 5. 
    A pyramid diagram illustrating evidence-based information that depicts the potential quality of information, the amount available, and the amount of searching required to find evidence.
    • A. 

      Levels of evidence

    • B. 

      Bibliometrics

    • C. 

      Critical pyramid

    • D. 

      Evidence pyramid

  • 6. 
    Information litteracy
    • A. 

      A way to measure visibility of research by calculating a ratio of current citations of the journal to all the citations in the same time period

    • B. 

      The competencies necessary to access, retrieve, and analyze research evidence for application to nursing practice.

    • C. 

      Words or phrases that describe each search concept used to conduct the literature search. They may include variables in the research question, characteristics of the population of interest, or the theoretical framework of the research problem.

    • D. 

      A classic work of research literature that is more than 5 years old and is marked by its uniqueness and contribution to professional knowledge

  • 7. 
    A way to measure visibility of research by calculating a ratio of current citations of the journal to all the citations in the same time period
    • A. 

      Journal impact factor

    • B. 

      Literature review

    • C. 

      Information litteracy

    • D. 

      Boolean operators

  • 8. 
    A scale that provides the user with a quick way to assess the quality of the study design and therefore the strength of the study conclusions
    • A. 

      Levels of evidence

    • B. 

      Literature review

    • C. 

      Search terms

    • D. 

      Open access

  • 9. 
    Literature review
    • A. 

      Reports of original research authored by the researcher and published in a scholarly source such as a peer-reviewed research journal or scholarly book.

    • B. 

      The objective evaluation of the quality of a research study, done by peer researchers without knowledge of the author or the source

    • C. 

      A critical component of the research process that provides an in-depth analysis of recently published research findings in specifically identified areas of interest. The review informs the research question and guides development of the research plan.

    • D. 

      Comments and summaries of multiple research studies on one topic such as systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and meta-syntheses, which are based on the secondary author’s interpretation of the primary work

  • 10. 
    The objective evaluation of the quality of a research study, done by peer researchers without knowledge of the author or the source
    • A. 

      Primary sources

    • B. 

      Secondary sources

    • C. 

      Peer review

    • D. 

      Nursing research

  • 11. 
    Information that is freely available online with little or no copyright restrictions.
    • A. 

      Search concepts

    • B. 

      Peer review

    • C. 

      Subject heading

    • D. 

      Open access

  • 12. 
    Reports of original research authored by the researcher and published in a scholarly source such as a peer-reviewed research journal or scholarly book.
    • A. 

      Secondary sources

    • B. 

      Primary sources

    • C. 

      Tertiary sources

    • D. 

      Quaternary sources

  • 13. 
    Major ideas or themes in a research question.
    • A. 

      Search terms

    • B. 

      Search strategy

    • C. 

      Variable

    • D. 

      Search concepts

  • 14. 
    The identification of search concepts and terms and the way they are combined that will be used in the literature review.
    • A. 

      Search strategy

    • B. 

      Seminal work

    • C. 

      Search terms

    • D. 

      Open access

  • 15. 
    Words or phrases that describe each search concept used to conduct the literature search. They may include variables in the research question, characteristics of the population of interest, or the theoretical framework of the research problem.
    • A. 

      Search terms

    • B. 

      Boolean operators

    • C. 

      Search strategy

    • D. 

      Subject headings

  • 16. 
    Comments and summaries of multiple research studies on one topic such as systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and meta-syntheses, which are based on the secondary author’s interpretation of the primary work
    • A. 

      Primary sources

    • B. 

      Secondary sources

    • C. 

      Peer review

    • D. 

      Search concepts

  • 17. 
    A classic work of research literature that is more than 5 years old and is marked by its uniqueness and contribution to professional knowledge
    • A. 

      Theoretical literature

    • B. 

      Subject headings

    • C. 

      Confirmatory studies

    • D. 

      Seminal work

  • 18. 
    Fixed "official" keywords used by many databases to describe major concepts and assigned by indexers to bibliographic records.
    • A. 

      Theoretical literature

    • B. 

      Subject headings

    • C. 

      Search terms

    • D. 

      Search strategy

  • 19. 
    Published conceptual models, frameworks, and theories that provide a basis for the researcher’s belief system and for ways of thinking about the problem studied.
    • A. 

      Theoretical literature

    • B. 

      Seminal work

    • C. 

      Primary sources

    • D. 

      Secondary sources

  • 20. 
    Research approaches in which a relationship between variables has been posed and the study is designed to examine these hypotheses.
    • A. 

      Confirmatory studies

    • B. 

      Dependent variable

    • C. 

      Descriptive studies

    • D. 

      Correlation research

  • 21. 
    Research designed to quantify the strength and the direction of the relationship of two variables in a single subject or the relationship between a single variable in two samples.
    • A. 

      Descriptive variables

    • B. 

      Theoretical litterature

    • C. 

      Correlation research

    • D. 

      Quantitative research

  • 22. 
    An outcome of interest that occurs after the introduction of an independent variable. The “effect” of “cause and effect.”
    • A. 

      Descriptive variables

    • B. 

      Independent variables

    • C. 

      Non-descriptive variables

    • D. 

      Dependent variable

  • 23. 
    Research designed to describe in detail some process, event, or outcome. The design is used when very little is known about the research question.
    • A. 

      Correlation search

    • B. 

      Confirmatory studies

    • C. 

      Descriptive studies

    • D. 

      Dependent variables

  • 24. 
    Characteristics that describe the sample and provide a composite picture of the subjects of the study; they are not manipulated or controlled by the researcher.
    • A. 

      Descriptive variables

    • B. 

      Descriptive studies

    • C. 

      Variable

    • D. 

      Extraneous variables

  • 25. 
    Research approaches designed to explore and describe a phenomenon of interest and generate new knowledge.
    • A. 

      Extraneous studies

    • B. 

      Exploratory studies

    • C. 

      Independent variable

    • D. 

      Research design

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