Neurological Disorders (Patho)

36 Questions | Total Attempts: 210

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Disorder Quizzes & Trivia

Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    During fetal development, the neural tube forms from ________ at ~18 days of gestation. Starts as open-ended structure, closes ~28 days gestation, brain starts to develop.
  • 2. 
    Rapid, intermittent contraction of a muscle in response to a sudden stretch which occurs in UMN lesions is:
    • A. 

      Hydrocephalus

    • B. 

      Neurapraxia

    • C. 

      Clonus

    • D. 

      Axonotmesis

  • 3. 
    Which of the following is true about CSF?
    • A. 

      Protects the brain & spinal cord (shock absorption)

    • B. 

      Brings hormones to the nervous system

    • C. 

      When drainage of CSF is compromised, ventricles expand= Decreased pressure on brain

    • D. 

      Recycled through absorption into the venous system (total amt CSF is renewed several times a day)

  • 4. 
    When drainage of CSF is compromised, the ventricles expand= increased pressure on the brain (Hydrocephalus). Pressure is reduced via a ______ which drains into the abdominal cavity.
  • 5. 
    Cerebrum/cerebral cortex- each area of cerebral cortex is associated with a different function. (Ex: Language, perception, movement etc.)
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 6. 
    The Vestibular system is responsible for which of the following?
    • A. 

      Position of body in relation to gravity

    • B. 

      Associated with emotions & long term memory

    • C. 

      Position of eyes in relation to the environment

    • D. 

      Keeps body in a stable position

  • 7. 
    The Limbic system is associated with emotions and long term memory.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 8. 
    Damage to peripheral nerves may be reversible or irreversible.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 9. 
    Temporary damage to a nerve, caused by pressure without structural changes, and may cause temporary paralysis is called:
    • A. 

      Neurotmesis

    • B. 

      Axonotmesis

    • C. 

      Radiculopathy

    • D. 

      Neurapraxia

  • 10. 
    Degeneration of neuronal axon (which may or may not grow back)/ Neural sheath remains in tact and temporary or permanent damage may occur describes:
    • A. 

      Axonotmesis

    • B. 

      Neurotmesis

    • C. 

      Neurapraxia

    • D. 

      Radiculopathy

  • 11. 
    Damage to the axon and neural sheath resulting in permanent paralysis is:
    • A. 

      Axonotmesis

    • B. 

      Neurotmesis

    • C. 

      Neurapraxia

    • D. 

      Brodmann's area

  • 12. 
    When compression of the nerve occurs where the nerve root exits the intervertebral foramen is:
    • A. 

      Neurapraxia

    • B. 

      Axonotmesis

    • C. 

      Neurotmesis

    • D. 

      Radiculopathy

  • 13. 
    Chiari malformations is a defect of the cerebellum which causes blockage of CSF flow, and _______ protrudes into spinal canal through the foramen magnum and causes pressure on the spinal cord.
  • 14. 
    Treatment for Arnold-Chiari malformation is surgical decompression, and PT treatment may be involved with balance & coordination disorders associated with the cerebellum. 
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 15. 
    Signs/symptoms of Autism Spectrum disorder include poor eye contact, short attention span, delayed speech, sensitivity to light, touch and sound, slapping, banging head etc., and unable to interpret facial expressions/body language.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 16. 
    When working with a patient with dementia, simple commands, firm but calm voice, mobility & strengthening and balance activities are appropriate indications. 
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 17. 
    Which of the following is true about patients with Alzheimer's disease?
    • A. 

      They forget both recent and distant events

    • B. 

      Loss of ability to learn new things

    • C. 

      Personality changes (may become aggressive)

    • D. 

      Death usually in 7-8 years after diagnosis

    • E. 

      Seven stages/ No cure

  • 18. 
    Which of the following is true about Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis?
    • A. 

      Progressive, degenerative disease that affects UMN & LMN

    • B. 

      Lateral aspect of motor neurons in spinal cord & brain

    • C. 

      Sensory system remains in tact

    • D. 

      Affects women more than men ( age 40-60)

    • E. 

      High concentration of glutamate in CSF destroys neurons

  • 19. 
    Patients with Alzheimer's disease have large numbers of tangles of __________. Plaques & amyloid (protein) tissue accumulate and prevents normal transmission of nerve impulses.
  • 20. 
    Treatments of seizures may include _________ medications, vagus nerve stimulation, brain surgery (remove area of brain responsible for local seizures) or hemispherectomy, ketogenic diet (high fat, no sugars).
  • 21. 
    An autoimmune disorder (triggered by previous infection such as the flue or traumatic event) in which the immune system attacks the neural tissue, which breaks down the myelin sheath & axons of the peripheral nerves is:
    • A. 

      Epilepsy

    • B. 

      Ischemic CVA

    • C. 

      Guillain Barre Syndrome

    • D. 

      Petit Mal

  • 22. 
    Which of the following are signs/symptoms of Guillain Barre Syndrome/ Acute Inflammatory Demyelinating Neuropathy?
    • A. 

      Weakness usually bilateral / Weakest ~3 weeks after onset

    • B. 

      Tingling in skin (starts in LEs)

    • C. 

      Prominent DTR deep tendon reflexes

    • D. 

      CSF with abnormally high levels of protein

  • 23. 
    Which of the following is true regarding Neuropathy/Polyneuropathy
    • A. 

      Decreased sensation/pain/weakness

    • B. 

      May be debilitating or lead to skin breakdown

    • C. 

      Pt tx= orthotics/ wound care/ ther-ex, etc

    • D. 

      Usually greater in UEs

  • 24. 
    Long version of _______=makes long huntington protein, long protein breaks into segments that coagulate & build up in the neurons of the brain. Normal huntington protein is though to protect neurons of brain from self destruction. 
  • 25. 
    Which of the following are true about Huntington's disease?
    • A. 

      Start in 30s & 40s and progresses slowly

    • B. 

      Progressive hereditary (autosomal dom.) degenerative

    • C. 

      Movement disorders/ Hallucinations/ Sleep & behavior changes

    • D. 

      Slurred speech/ dementia/ seizures etc

    • E. 

      Death ~70 years of age

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