Neurobiology Of Appetite Regulation

18 Questions | Total Attempts: 1100

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Neurobiology Quizzes & Trivia

Self-test for Neurobiology of Appetite Regulation (Week 111)


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    The arcuate nucleus is located in the
    • A. 

      Amygdala

    • B. 

      Brainstem

    • C. 

      Frontal Cortex

    • D. 

      Hypothalamus

    • E. 

      Ventral Tegmental Area

  • 2. 
    Hyperphagia is
    • A. 

      Intake of calorie-rich foods

    • B. 

      Low appetite and mood

    • C. 

      Abnormally slow digestion

    • D. 

      Excessive food intake and hunger

    • E. 

      A giant man-eating virus. From outer space.

  • 3. 
    Which region of the hypothalamus, when lesioned, produces hyperphagia
    • A. 

      Arcuate nuclues

    • B. 

      Lateral

    • C. 

      Ventromedial

    • D. 

      Posterior

    • E. 

      Dorsomedial

  • 4. 
    Which region of the hypothalamus, when lesioned, produces a reduction in "setpoint".
    • A. 

      Arcuate nucleus

    • B. 

      Lateral

    • C. 

      Ventromedial

    • D. 

      Posterior

    • E. 

      Dorsomedial

  • 5. 
    Which of the following is an adipostat
    • A. 

      Choleocystokinin

    • B. 

      Ghrelin

    • C. 

      Insulin

    • D. 

      Leptin

    • E. 

      Serotonin

  • 6. 
    Which of the following is produced by the Ob gene on human chromosome 7
    • A. 

      Choleocystokinin

    • B. 

      Ghrelin

    • C. 

      Insulin

    • D. 

      Leptin

    • E. 

      Serotonin

  • 7. 
    A major source of leptin in the body
    • A. 

      Adipose tissue

    • B. 

      Amygdala

    • C. 

      Lateral hypothalamus

    • D. 

      Small intestine

    • E. 

      Ventromedial hypothalamus

  • 8. 
    In normal healthy individuals the amount of circulating leptin is directly proportional to
    • A. 

      Blood sugar

    • B. 

      Body fat

    • C. 

      Food intake

    • D. 

      Rate of digestion

    • E. 

      Satiety status

  • 9. 
    In most obese people, leptin levels are
    • A. 

      Zero

    • B. 

      Lower than normal (but some leptin is present)

    • C. 

      Normal

    • D. 

      Elevated

  • 10. 
    However, there are cases of obesity associated with very low leptin levels. What might a cause of that be?
    • A. 

      Autoimmunity against leptin

    • B. 

      Genetic deficiency

    • C. 

      Insufficient absorption of leptin precursors in the diet

    • D. 

      Insufficient intake of leptin precursors in the diet

    • E. 

      Hypermetabolism of leptin

  • 11. 
    Peptides which inhibit feeding are called
  • 12. 
    Examples of anorexigenic peptides
    • A. 

      Agouti-related peptide (AgRP)

    • B. 

      Alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH)

    • C. 

      Cocaine and amphetamine related transcript (CART)

    • D. 

      Neuropeptide Y (NPY)

    • E. 

      Platelet Derived Growth Factor (PDGF)

  • 13. 
    Examples of orexigenic peptides
    • A. 

      Agouti related peptide (AgRP)

    • B. 

      Alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH)

    • C. 

      Cocaine and Amphetamine Related Transcript

    • D. 

      Neuropeptide Y (NPY)

    • E. 

      Platelet Derived Growth Factor (PDGF)

  • 14. 
    The Melanocortin receptor 4 (MCR4) is activated by
    • A. 

      AgRP

    • B. 

      Alpha-MSH

    • C. 

      Ghrelin

    • D. 

      Leptin

    • E. 

      Serotonin

  • 15. 
    The melanocortin receptor 4 (MCR4) is blocked by
    • A. 

      AgRP

    • B. 

      Alpha-MSH

    • C. 

      Ghrelin

    • D. 

      Leptin

    • E. 

      Serotonin

  • 16. 
    Stimulation of the ? nerve causes satiety
  • 17. 
    The vagus nerve is activated by
    • A. 

      Chewing

    • B. 

      Choleocystokinin

    • C. 

      Leptin

    • D. 

      Propiomelanocortin

    • E. 

      Stomach distension

  • 18. 
    Ghrelin
    • A. 

      Levels rise before meals, fall after meals

    • B. 

      Levels rise after meals, fall before meals

    • C. 

      Levels are not directly affected by food

    • D. 

      Levels are reduced in obesity

    • E. 

      Levels are increased in obesity