Nervous System Quiz About Stuff About Sensation, Nerves

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Nervous System Quizzes & Trivia

Stuff about sensation, nerves


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    Sensation that reach the cerebral cortex are

    • A.

      Unconscious awareness

    • B.

      Conscious awareness

    • C.

      Can be both unconscious or conscious

    Correct Answer
    B. Conscious awareness
    Explanation
    The sensation that reach the cerebral cortex refers to the sensory information that is processed and interpreted by the brain. Conscious awareness implies that the individual is aware of and actively perceiving these sensations. Therefore, the correct answer is conscious awareness, indicating that the sensations reaching the cerebral cortex are perceived and consciously experienced by an individual.

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  • 2. 

    The receptors located in muscles, tendons, joints and inner ear and provide information about body positions and movements of joints are:

    • A.

      Exteroceptors

    • B.

      Interoceptors

    • C.

      Proprioceptors

    Correct Answer
    C. Proprioceptors
    Explanation
    Proprioceptors are the receptors located in muscles, tendons, joints, and the inner ear that provide information about body positions and movements of joints. These receptors send signals to the brain, allowing us to have a sense of where our body is in space and how our limbs are moving. This information is crucial for maintaining balance, coordinating movements, and performing tasks that require spatial awareness. Exteroceptors, on the other hand, are responsible for detecting stimuli from the external environment, while interoceptors monitor internal body conditions.

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  • 3. 

    Nociceptors responds to

    • A.

      Pain

    • B.

      Temperature

    • C.

      Light

    • D.

      Pressure

    Correct Answer
    A. Pain
    Explanation
    Nociceptors are sensory receptors that detect and transmit signals related to pain. They are specialized to respond to potentially harmful stimuli, such as extreme temperatures, intense pressure, or tissue damage. Therefore, the correct answer is pain, as nociceptors specifically respond to pain signals.

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  • 4. 

    Sensory receptors that have exposed dendrites at the end of sensory neurons are

    • A.

      Seperate cells

    • B.

      Encapsulated nerve endings

    • C.

      Free nerve endings

    Correct Answer
    C. Free nerve endings
    Explanation
    Free nerve endings are sensory receptors that have exposed dendrites at the end of sensory neurons. These dendrites are not encapsulated or enclosed within any structure, hence the term "free". Free nerve endings are found throughout the body and are responsible for detecting various stimuli such as pain, temperature, and pressure. They are particularly abundant in the skin and mucous membranes.

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  • 5. 

    Somatic senses do NOT include which of the following:

    • A.

      Vision

    • B.

      Tactile

    • C.

      Thermal

    • D.

      Pain

    • E.

      Proprioceptive

    Correct Answer
    A. Vision
    Explanation
    Somatic senses refer to the senses that provide information about the body and its environment, such as touch, temperature, pain, and proprioception (awareness of body position). Vision, on the other hand, is a sense that involves the eyes and provides information about the surrounding environment. Therefore, it is not considered a somatic sense.

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  • 6. 

    Thermal sensations are detected by _________________________ .  Cold receptors are located in the _____________

    • A.

      Thermoreceptors , epidermis

    • B.

      Thermoreceptors, dermis

    • C.

      Tactile, epidermis

    • D.

      Tactile, dermis

    Correct Answer
    A. Thermoreceptors , epidermis
    Explanation
    Thermal sensations are detected by thermoreceptors, which are specialized sensory receptors that respond to changes in temperature. These receptors are located in the epidermis, the outermost layer of the skin. The epidermis contains a network of nerve endings that detect temperature changes and transmit this information to the brain, allowing us to perceive sensations of hot and cold.

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  • 7. 

    Tactile sensations have what anatomical features:

    • A.

      Free nerve endings

    • B.

      Encapsulated mechanoreceptors

    • C.

      Both

    • D.

      Neither

    Correct Answer
    C. Both
    Explanation
    Tactile sensations have both anatomical features of free nerve endings and encapsulated mechanoreceptors. Free nerve endings are found throughout the skin and are responsible for detecting pain and temperature. Encapsulated mechanoreceptors, on the other hand, are specialized nerve endings surrounded by connective tissue capsules that respond to mechanical stimuli such as pressure, vibration, and touch. Therefore, both types of anatomical features play a role in the perception of tactile sensations.

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  • 8. 

    Nociceptors are receptors for pain found in every tissue in the body except:

    • A.

      Liver

    • B.

      Brain

    • C.

      Heart

    • D.

      None of these

    Correct Answer
    B. Brain
    Explanation
    Nociceptors are specialized nerve endings that detect and transmit signals of pain to the brain. They are found in every tissue in the body except the brain. The brain itself does not contain nociceptors as it is responsible for processing and interpreting pain signals received from other parts of the body. Therefore, the correct answer is Brain.

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  • 9. 

    The spinal cord has two main functions which are (mark all that apply)

    • A.

      Nerve impulse propagation

    • B.

      Sensory receptors

    • C.

      Information integration

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Nerve impulse propagation
    C. Information integration
    Explanation
    The spinal cord is a crucial part of the central nervous system and serves as a pathway for transmitting nerve impulses between the brain and the rest of the body. This function is known as nerve impulse propagation. Additionally, the spinal cord also plays a role in integrating sensory information received from various parts of the body. This allows for the coordination and processing of sensory signals, contributing to information integration.

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  • 10. 

    In which part of the spinal cord are the highways for nerve impulses propagation.

    • A.

      White matter tracts

    • B.

      Grey matter tracts

    • C.

      Both

    Correct Answer
    A. White matter tracts
    Explanation
    White matter tracts in the spinal cord are responsible for carrying nerve impulses between different parts of the body and the brain. These tracts contain bundles of myelinated nerve fibers, which appear white in color. Nerve impulses travel along these tracts, allowing for the transmission of sensory and motor information. Grey matter, on the other hand, contains cell bodies and unmyelinated nerve fibers, and is primarily involved in processing and integrating information. Therefore, the correct answer is white matter tracts, as they serve as the highways for nerve impulse propagation in the spinal cord.

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  • 11. 

    What are the two main pathways for sensory receptors to propogate up the spinal cord

    • A.

      Spinolthalamic tract

    • B.

      Direct motor pathway

    • C.

      Indirect motor pathway

    • D.

      Posterior columns

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Spinolthalamic tract
    D. Posterior columns
    Explanation
    The two main pathways for sensory receptors to propagate up the spinal cord are the spinolthalamic tract and the posterior columns. The spinolthalamic tract carries pain, temperature, and crude touch information, while the posterior columns transmit fine touch, proprioception, and vibration sensations. These pathways play a crucial role in relaying sensory information from the body to the brain for perception and interpretation.

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  • 12. 

    Spinothalamic tracts carry nerve impulses for (mark all that apply)

    • A.

      Pain

    • B.

      Thermal sensation

    • C.

      Tickle & itch

    • D.

      Crude touch

    • E.

      Conscious proprioception

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Pain
    B. Thermal sensation
    C. Tickle & itch
    D. Crude touch
    Explanation
    The spinothalamic tracts are responsible for carrying nerve impulses for pain, thermal sensation, tickle and itch, and crude touch. These tracts transmit sensory information from the skin and other peripheral tissues to the brain. Pain and thermal sensation are important for detecting and responding to potential harm or changes in temperature. Tickle and itch sensations are related to the activation of specific nerve receptors in the skin. Crude touch refers to the ability to perceive touch and pressure, without being able to discriminate specific details. Conscious proprioception, which involves the awareness of body position and movement, is not carried by the spinothalamic tracts.

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  • 13. 

    Awareness of positions and movements of muscles, tendons & joings is carried on which sensory pathway

    • A.

      Spinothalamic tracts

    • B.

      Posterior tract

    Correct Answer
    B. Posterior tract
    Explanation
    The correct answer is the posterior tract. The posterior tract, also known as the posterior column-medial lemniscus pathway, is responsible for carrying sensory information related to positions and movements of muscles, tendons, and joints. This pathway transmits proprioceptive information from the body to the brain, allowing us to have an awareness of our body's position and movement.

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  • 14. 

    Motor output from upper motor neurons travel down spinal cord to the lower motor neurons that exit from the cerebral cortex via which pathway

    • A.

      Direct motor pathways

    • B.

      Indirect motor pathways

    Correct Answer
    A. Direct motor pathways
    Explanation
    The correct answer is direct motor pathways. Motor output from upper motor neurons travels down the spinal cord to the lower motor neurons that exit from the cerebral cortex via the direct motor pathways. These pathways directly connect the cerebral cortex to the spinal cord, allowing for voluntary and precise control of motor movements.

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  • 15. 

    Direct motor pathways arise from the cerebral cortex, extend into the spinal cord and out to skeletal muscles & include which of following:

    • A.

      Lateral corticospinal tract

    • B.

      Rubrospinal tract

    • C.

      Anterior corticospinal tracts

    • D.

      Corticobulbar tracts

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Lateral corticospinal tract
    C. Anterior corticospinal tracts
    D. Corticobulbar tracts
    Explanation
    Direct motor pathways are responsible for transmitting signals from the cerebral cortex to skeletal muscles. The lateral corticospinal tract is one of the direct motor pathways that originates in the cerebral cortex and extends into the spinal cord, controlling voluntary movements of the limbs. The anterior corticospinal tracts are another set of direct motor pathways that also arise from the cerebral cortex and descend into the spinal cord, controlling voluntary movements of the axial muscles. Corticobulbar tracts are direct motor pathways that connect the cerebral cortex to the cranial nerves, allowing for voluntary control of muscles in the head and neck. Therefore, all three options mentioned in the answer are correct as they are all direct motor pathways that arise from the cerebral cortex and extend into the spinal cord or cranial nerves.

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  • 16. 

    Indirect motor pathways arise from the brain stem & include different tracts.  Which one of thesetracts  controls the movement of the head & eyes - visual stimuli only

    • A.

      Rubrospinal tracts

    • B.

      Tectospinal tracts

    • C.

      Vestibulospinal tracts

    • D.

      Lateral & medial reticulospinal tracts

    Correct Answer
    B. Tectospinal tracts
    Explanation
    The tectospinal tracts control the movement of the head and eyes in response to visual stimuli. These tracts originate from the superior colliculus in the midbrain and descend to the spinal cord. When visual stimuli are detected, the tectospinal tracts coordinate the appropriate movements of the head and eyes to track the stimuli.

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  • 17. 

    Basal ganglia function to

    • A.

      Initiate and terminate movement

    • B.

      Suppress unwanted movements

    • C.

      Influence muscle tone

    • D.

      Influence cortical function - sensory, limbic, cognitive, linguistic

    • E.

      All of the above

    Correct Answer
    E. All of the above
    Explanation
    The basal ganglia are a group of structures in the brain that play a crucial role in movement initiation and termination. They also help in suppressing unwanted movements and influencing muscle tone. Additionally, the basal ganglia have connections with various regions of the cortex, allowing them to influence cortical function in sensory, limbic, cognitive, and linguistic domains. Therefore, all of the given options accurately describe the functions of the basal ganglia.

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  • 18. 

    Conditions of sleep & wakefulness are monitored within which part of the brain

    • A.

      Limbic

    • B.

      Brain stem

    • C.

      Cerebrum

    • D.

      Cerebellum

    Correct Answer
    C. Cerebrum
    Explanation
    The cerebrum is responsible for monitoring the conditions of sleep and wakefulness. It is the largest part of the brain and controls higher cognitive functions such as perception, thinking, and memory. Within the cerebrum, there are specific regions such as the hypothalamus and the pineal gland that regulate sleep and wakefulness. These regions receive signals from the body and the environment, and based on these signals, they regulate the sleep-wake cycle. Therefore, the cerebrum is the correct answer as it plays a crucial role in monitoring the conditions of sleep and wakefulness.

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  • 19. 

    The spinal cord connect to the brain thru a large hole in the base of the skull called

    • A.

      Cauda equina

    • B.

      Foramen magnum

    • C.

      Brain stem

    Correct Answer
    B. Foramen magnum
    Explanation
    The spinal cord connects to the brain through a large hole in the base of the skull called the foramen magnum. This opening allows the spinal cord to pass from the cranial cavity to the vertebral canal, where it continues its journey down the spinal column. The foramen magnum also serves as a protective passage for important structures like blood vessels and nerves that connect the brain to the rest of the body.

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  • 20. 

    The CNS is protected by__________________  & ______________

    • A.

      The cranium and vertebrae

    • B.

      The Dura mater

    • C.

      The arachnoid mater

    • D.

      The pia mater

    • E.

      All of the above

    Correct Answer
    E. All of the above
    Explanation
    The CNS (central nervous system) is comprised of the brain and spinal cord, which are both protected by various layers. The cranium (skull) protects the brain, while the vertebrae (bones of the spine) provide protection for the spinal cord. Additionally, the CNS is surrounded by three layers of meninges: the dura mater, arachnoid mater, and pia mater. The dura mater is the outermost and toughest layer, followed by the arachnoid mater, and finally the pia mater, which is the innermost layer. Therefore, all of the options listed (the cranium, vertebrae, dura mater, arachnoid mater, and pia mater) contribute to the protection of the CNS.

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  • 21. 

    The space between the dura mater and arachnoid mater is called:

    • A.

      Subarachnoid space

    • B.

      Subdural space

    • C.

      Epidural space

    Correct Answer
    C. Epidural space
    Explanation
    The space between the dura mater and arachnoid mater is called the epidural space. This space is located outside the dura mater and contains fat, blood vessels, and connective tissue. It is important in medical procedures such as epidural anesthesia, where medication is injected into this space to provide pain relief. The subarachnoid space, on the other hand, is located between the arachnoid mater and pia mater and contains cerebrospinal fluid. The subdural space is located between the dura mater and arachnoid mater, but it is not the correct answer in this case.

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  • 22. 

    Cerebrospinal fluid protects the CNS from chemical & physical injury but also functions to

    • A.

      Provide oxygen

    • B.

      Provide glucose

    • C.

      Both

    • D.

      Neither

    Correct Answer
    C. Both
    Explanation
    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) serves multiple functions in the central nervous system (CNS). It acts as a protective cushion, shielding the CNS from chemical and physical injury. Additionally, CSF plays a role in providing oxygen and glucose to the brain and spinal cord, which are essential for their proper functioning. Therefore, the correct answer is "Both" because CSF provides both oxygen and glucose while also protecting the CNS.

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  • 23. 

    The cerebrospinal fluid as is continually circulated through which space

    • A.

      Epidural space

    • B.

      Subdural space

    • C.

      Subarachnoid space

    Correct Answer
    C. Subarachnoid space
    Explanation
    The subarachnoid space is the correct answer because it is the space where the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulates. This space is located between the arachnoid mater and the pia mater, which are two of the three layers that make up the meninges surrounding the brain and spinal cord. The CSF is produced in the ventricles of the brain and flows through the subarachnoid space, providing cushioning and protection for the central nervous system.

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  • 24. 

    What is the cauda equina

    • A.

      Superior enlargement

    • B.

      Nerves hanging down in vertebral cavity

    • C.

      Inferior enlargement

    Correct Answer
    B. Nerves hanging down in vertebral cavity
    Explanation
    The cauda equina refers to the bundle of nerves that hang down within the vertebral cavity. It is located below the spinal cord and resembles a horse's tail, which is what "cauda equina" translates to in Latin. This bundle of nerves is responsible for transmitting sensory and motor signals between the spinal cord and the lower extremities of the body.

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  • 25. 

    The spinal cord is made up of white and grey matter, which of these has bundles of axons called tracts

    • A.

      White matter

    • B.

      Grey Matter

    • C.

      Both

    • D.

      Neither

    Correct Answer
    A. White matter
    Explanation
    White matter in the spinal cord contains bundles of axons called tracts. These tracts are responsible for transmitting information between different parts of the spinal cord and between the spinal cord and the brain. Grey matter, on the other hand, consists mainly of cell bodies and dendrites of neurons, and is involved in processing and integrating information within the spinal cord. Therefore, the correct answer is white matter.

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  • 26. 

    Each spinal nerve is connected to a segment of the spinal cord by structures known as roots, which are the __________  &  ____________

    • A.

      Dorsal & posterior

    • B.

      Dorsal & ventral

    • C.

      Posterior & anterior

    Correct Answer
    B. Dorsal & ventral
    Explanation
    Each spinal nerve is connected to a segment of the spinal cord by structures known as roots. The dorsal root carries sensory information from the body to the spinal cord, while the ventral root carries motor information from the spinal cord to the body. Therefore, the correct answer is dorsal & ventral.

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  • 27. 

    Which of these roots contains only sensory axons that convey sensory input to the CNS

    • A.

      Dorsal

    • B.

      Ventral

    • C.

      Both

    Correct Answer
    A. Dorsal
    Explanation
    The dorsal root contains only sensory axons that convey sensory input to the central nervous system (CNS). The sensory information from the body is transmitted through these axons to the spinal cord, where it is then relayed to the brain for processing. The ventral root, on the other hand, contains motor axons that carry signals from the CNS to muscles and glands, allowing for movement and other motor functions. Therefore, the correct answer is dorsal.

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  • 28. 

    The dorsal & ventral roots unite to form a spinal nerve at the

    • A.

      Cauda equina

    • B.

      Intervertebral foramen

    • C.

      Fossi

    Correct Answer
    B. Intervertebral foramen
    Explanation
    The dorsal and ventral roots of the spinal nerve come together or unite at the intervertebral foramen. This is the opening between adjacent vertebrae through which the spinal nerves pass. The intervertebral foramen provides a pathway for the spinal nerves to exit the spinal cord and branch out to various parts of the body. The cauda equina refers to a bundle of spinal nerves extending from the lower end of the spinal cord, while fossi is not a recognized anatomical term.

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  • 29. 

    What part of the brain is responsible for regulating heart beat, respirations, Blood vessel diameter, swallowing, vomiting, coughing, sneezing & hipcupping

    • A.

      Pons

    • B.

      Midbrain

    • C.

      Medulla oblongata

    • D.

      Epithalamus

    Correct Answer
    C. Medulla oblongata
    Explanation
    The medulla oblongata is responsible for regulating heart beat, respirations, blood vessel diameter, swallowing, vomiting, coughing, sneezing, and hiccupping. It is located at the base of the brainstem and acts as a control center for many essential involuntary functions. It contains various nuclei that coordinate and control these vital processes, ensuring the proper functioning of the body.

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  • 30. 

    Which part of the brains contains the pneumatoxic & apneustic areas and works with the medulla oblongata to control the rate and depth of respiration.

    • A.

      Midbrain

    • B.

      Pons

    • C.

      Thalamus

    • D.

      Hypothalamus

    Correct Answer
    B. Pons
    Explanation
    The pons is the part of the brain that contains the pneumatoxic and apneustic areas and works with the medulla oblongata to control the rate and depth of respiration. The pons is located in the brainstem and plays a crucial role in regulating breathing. It receives signals from the medulla oblongata and sends them to the respiratory muscles to control the breathing rate and depth. Therefore, the pons is responsible for coordinating and fine-tuning the respiratory process.

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  • 31. 

    Which part of the brain is often called the seat of intelligence as it gives us the ability to read, write, speak, imagine and remember

    • A.

      Cerebellum

    • B.

      Brain stem

    • C.

      Cerebrum

    • D.

      Diencephalon

    Correct Answer
    C. Cerebrum
    Explanation
    The cerebrum is often called the seat of intelligence because it is responsible for higher cognitive functions such as reading, writing, speaking, imagining, and remembering. It is the largest part of the brain and is divided into two hemispheres. The cerebrum plays a crucial role in processing sensory information, controlling voluntary movements, and higher-level thinking processes such as problem-solving and decision-making. It contains specialized areas called lobes that are responsible for specific functions such as language processing (in the left hemisphere) and visual processing (in the occipital lobe).

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  • 32. 

    Which part of the nervous system consists of the cranial nerves & branches, spinal nerves & branches, Ganglia & sensory receptors

    • A.

      CNS

    • B.

      PNS

    • C.

      Both

    Correct Answer
    B. PNS
    Explanation
    The correct answer is PNS, which stands for Peripheral Nervous System. This part of the nervous system includes the cranial nerves and branches, spinal nerves and branches, ganglia, and sensory receptors. The PNS is responsible for transmitting information between the central nervous system (CNS) and the rest of the body. It allows for communication and coordination of sensory and motor functions, as well as the regulation of involuntary bodily processes.

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  • 33. 

    Which part of the nervous system is responsible for involuntary neural control because its motor responses are not normally under conscious control?

    • A.

      Somatic Nervous system

    • B.

      Autonomic nervous system

    • C.

      Both

    • D.

      Neither

    Correct Answer
    B. Autonomic nervous system
    Explanation
    The autonomic nervous system is responsible for involuntary neural control because its motor responses are not normally under conscious control. This system regulates automatic bodily functions such as heart rate, digestion, and breathing. Unlike the somatic nervous system, which controls voluntary movements, the autonomic nervous system operates unconsciously and automatically. It consists of two divisions, the sympathetic and parasympathetic, which work together to maintain homeostasis in the body.

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  • 34. 

    Nervous tissue consists of which two types of cells, (mark all that apply)

    • A.

      Neurons

    • B.

      Axons

    • C.

      Neuroglia

    • D.

      Dendrites

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Neurons
    C. Neuroglia
    Explanation
    Nervous tissue is composed of two main types of cells: neurons and neuroglia. Neurons are the primary cells responsible for transmitting electrical signals in the nervous system. They have specialized structures called dendrites and axons, which help in receiving and transmitting signals, respectively. Neuroglia, on the other hand, are non-neuronal cells that provide support and protection to neurons. They play a crucial role in maintaining the overall function and structure of the nervous system. Therefore, the correct answer is neurons and neuroglia.

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  • 35. 

    Structurally the neuron that has one main dendrite and one axon and is a component of some of the special sense organs is

    • A.

      Multipolar neurons

    • B.

      Bipolar neurons

    • C.

      Unipolar neurons

    Correct Answer
    B. Bipolar neurons
    Explanation
    Bipolar neurons have one main dendrite and one axon, making them structurally fit the description given in the question. These neurons are found in some of the special sense organs, such as the retina of the eye, where they are responsible for transmitting sensory information.

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  • 36. 

    Which of these neuroglia's are found in the CNS?

    • A.

      Satellite cells

    • B.

      Oligodentrocytes

    • C.

      Ependymal cells

    • D.

      Schwann cells

    • E.

      Astrocytes

    Correct Answer(s)
    B. Oligodentrocytes
    C. Ependymal cells
    E. Astrocytes
    Explanation
    Oligodendrocytes, ependymal cells, and astrocytes are all types of neuroglia that are found in the central nervous system (CNS). Oligodendrocytes are responsible for producing the myelin sheath that insulates and protects nerve fibers in the CNS. Ependymal cells line the ventricles of the brain and the central canal of the spinal cord, playing a role in the production and circulation of cerebrospinal fluid. Astrocytes are the most abundant neuroglia in the CNS and have various functions, including providing structural support, regulating the chemical environment, and contributing to the blood-brain barrier. Schwann cells, on the other hand, are a type of neuroglia found in the peripheral nervous system.

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  • 37. 

    Which neuroglia in the CNS are star shaped, the largest & most abundant and provide structural support to neurons.

    • A.

      Satellite Cells

    • B.

      Astrocytes

    • C.

      Microglia

    • D.

      Ependymal cells

    Correct Answer
    B. Astrocytes
    Explanation
    Astrocytes are star-shaped neuroglia in the CNS that are the largest and most abundant. They provide structural support to neurons by forming a network of processes that surround and protect them. Astrocytes also regulate the chemical environment around neurons, provide nutrients, and help repair damaged tissue. Their numerous functions make them essential for the proper functioning of the nervous system.

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  • 38. 

    Which neuroglia form the myelin sheath around the axons in the PNS

    • A.

      Satellite Cells

    • B.

      Schwann cells

    • C.

      Oligodendrocytes

    Correct Answer
    B. Schwann cells
    Explanation
    Schwann cells form the myelin sheath around the axons in the PNS. The myelin sheath acts as an insulating layer, allowing for faster conduction of electrical impulses along the axons. Satellite cells are responsible for providing support and nourishment to neurons in the PNS, while oligodendrocytes are responsible for forming the myelin sheath in the CNS.

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  • 39. 

    The small gaps in the myelin sheath is called

    • A.

      Ranvier gaps

    • B.

      Saltatory gaps

    • C.

      Nodes of ranvier

    Correct Answer
    C. Nodes of ranvier
    Explanation
    The small gaps in the myelin sheath are called nodes of Ranvier. These nodes are regularly spaced along the length of the axon and allow for the rapid conduction of nerve impulses. At these nodes, the axon is exposed and the electrical signal jumps from one node to the next, a process known as saltatory conduction. This allows for faster transmission of signals along the axon, making neural communication more efficient.

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  • 40. 

    What diseases are associated with demyelination

    • A.

      MS

    • B.

      Cushings disease

    • C.

      Tay Sachs Disease

    • D.

      Diabetes

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. MS
    C. Tay Sachs Disease
    Explanation
    Demyelination is a process in which the protective covering of nerve fibers, called myelin, is damaged or destroyed. Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a well-known disease associated with demyelination, as it causes the immune system to mistakenly attack the myelin in the central nervous system. Tay Sachs Disease is another condition linked to demyelination, although it primarily affects infants. It is a genetic disorder that leads to the accumulation of fatty substances in the brain, resulting in the destruction of myelin. Cushings disease and diabetes, on the other hand, are not typically associated with demyelination.

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  • 41. 

    Which matter forms nerve tracts in the CNS & nerves in the PNS

    • A.

      White matter

    • B.

      Grey Matter

    • C.

      Both

    • D.

      Neither

    Correct Answer
    A. White matter
    Explanation
    White matter is the correct answer because it is the type of matter that forms nerve tracts in the Central Nervous System (CNS) and nerves in the Peripheral Nervous System (PNS). White matter consists of myelinated axons, which are responsible for transmitting signals between different areas of the brain and spinal cord. In contrast, grey matter primarily contains cell bodies, dendrites, and unmyelinated axons. Therefore, white matter is the correct choice as it is specifically associated with the formation of nerve tracts in the CNS and nerves in the PNS.

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