Navigation (N)- Part 2

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Navigation (N)- Part 2 - Quiz

The use of a compass has been there for years now. It is mostly used in navigation of space and water vessels. Take up the navigation (n) - part 2 quizzes below and gauge how much you know.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    The magnetic variation value of a given point on the Earth's surface can be obtained by

    • A.

      (1) referring to the table of magnetic variation in the cockpit.

    • B.

      (2) referring to the isogonic lines on aeronautical charts

    • C.

      (3) calculating the angular difference between the meridian of a given point and the Greenwich meridian.

    • D.

      (4) calculating the difference between magnetic and compass heading.

    Correct Answer
    B. (2) referring to the isogonic lines on aeronautical charts
    Explanation
    The correct answer is (2) referring to the isogonic lines on aeronautical charts. Isogonic lines are lines on a map that connect points with the same magnetic variation. By referring to these lines on aeronautical charts, one can determine the magnetic variation at a given point on the Earth's surface. This method is commonly used in aviation for navigation purposes.

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  • 2. 

    Lines on geographical charts joining points of equal magnetic variation, are called

    • A.

      (1) izogonic lines.

    • B.

      (2) agonic lines.

    • C.

      (3) izoclinic lines.

    • D.

      (4) izobars.

    Correct Answer
    A. (1) izogonic lines.
    Explanation
    Izogonic lines are lines on geographical charts that join points of equal magnetic variation. These lines help to visualize the changes in magnetic variation across different locations. Agonic lines, on the other hand, are lines where there is no magnetic variation, meaning that the compass needle points directly to true north. Izoclinic lines represent lines of equal dip or inclination of the Earth's magnetic field. Izobars, on the other hand, are lines on weather maps that connect points of equal atmospheric pressure.

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  • 3. 

    Lines on geographical charts joining points of a zero magnetic variation, are called

    • A.

      (1) izogonic lines.

    • B.

      (2) izoclinic lines.

    • C.

      (3) agonic lines.

    • D.

      (4) aclinic lines.

    Correct Answer
    C. (3) agonic lines.
    Explanation
    Agonic lines are lines on geographical charts that join points of zero magnetic variation. Magnetic variation refers to the difference between true north and magnetic north. Therefore, agonic lines represent locations where true north and magnetic north align, resulting in zero magnetic variation. Izogonic lines (option 1) represent lines joining points of equal magnetic variation. Izoclinic lines (option 2) represent lines joining points of equal magnetic inclination. Aclinic lines (option 4) represent lines joining points of zero magnetic inclination.

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  • 4. 

    What is the magnetic variation of the area? (figure 14)

    • A.

      (1) 50° 30' W.

    • B.

      (2) 21° E.

    • C.

      (3) 50° W.

    • D.

      (4) 15° E.

    Correct Answer
    D. (4) 15° E.
    Explanation
    The correct answer is (4) 15° E. This means that the magnetic variation of the area is 15° east. Magnetic variation refers to the angle between true north and magnetic north at a specific location. A positive value indicates that magnetic north is east of true north, which is the case here. Therefore, the magnetic variation of the area is 15° east.

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  • 5. 

    When calculating magnetic direction from a given true direction, westerly variation shouldbe

    • A.

      (1) added.

    • B.

      (2) substracted.

    • C.

      (3) multiplicated.

    • D.

      (4) divided.

    Correct Answer
    A. (1) added.
    Explanation
    * Variation WEST, magnetic BEST (+)
    * Variation EAST, variation LEAST (-)

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  • 6. 

    Magnetic course is calculated using the equation

    • A.

      (1) true heading plus/minus magnetic variation.

    • B.

      (2) true course plus/minus magnetic variation.

    • C.

      (3) true course plus/minus compass deviation.

    • D.

      (4) magnetic heading plus/minus compass deviation.

    Correct Answer
    B. (2) true course plus/minus magnetic variation.
    Explanation
    The magnetic course is the direction in which an aircraft or vessel is actually moving, taking into account both the true course (the desired direction of travel) and the magnetic variation (the angular difference between true north and magnetic north). By adding or subtracting the magnetic variation from the true course, we can calculate the magnetic course. The compass deviation, on the other hand, is the difference between the magnetic heading (the direction in which the compass needle points) and the magnetic course, and is not used in this calculation. Therefore, the correct answer is (2) true course plus/minus magnetic variation.

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  • 7. 

    Magnetic heading is

    • A.

      (1) true heading plus/minus variation.

    • B.

      (2) true course plus/minus variation.

    • C.

      (3) true course plus/minus deviation.

    • D.

      (4) magnetic course plus/minus deviation.

    Correct Answer
    A. (1) true heading plus/minus variation.
    Explanation
    The correct answer is (1) true heading plus/minus variation. Magnetic heading refers to the direction in which an aircraft or vessel is actually pointing, taking into account the magnetic variation or declination. True heading, on the other hand, is the direction in which the aircraft or vessel would be pointing if there were no magnetic variation. Therefore, magnetic heading is calculated by adding or subtracting the magnetic variation from the true heading.

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  • 8. 

    Is it possible for a desired true track, true heading and actual true track to have the samevalue?

    • A.

      (1) No, in no case.

    • B.

      (2) Yes.

    • C.

      (3) Yes, because these values are always equal.

    • D.

      (4) This is possible only when flying in north or south direction.

    Correct Answer
    B. (2) Yes.
    Explanation
    It is possible for a desired true track, true heading, and actual true track to have the same value. This means that the pilot's intended route (desired true track), the direction the aircraft is actually pointing (true heading), and the direction the aircraft is actually moving (actual true track) are all aligned. This can occur in any direction, not just north or south.

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  • 9. 

    When converting from true course to magnetic heading, a pilot should

    • A.

      (1) subtract easterly variation and right wind correction angle.

    • B.

      (2) add westerly variation and subtract left wind correction angle.

    • C.

      (3) subtract westerly variation and add right wind correction angle.

    Correct Answer
    B. (2) add westerly variation and subtract left wind correction angle.
    Explanation
    Left wind (-), Right wind (+)

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  • 10. 

    Which element of the wind triangle has a null value if a magnetic heading equalscompass heading?

    • A.

      (1) Magnetic dip.

    • B.

      (2) Compass deviation.

    • C.

      (3) Drift.

    • D.

      (4) Magnetic variation.

    Correct Answer
    B. (2) Compass deviation.
    Explanation
    If a magnetic heading equals compass heading, it means that there is no deviation between the magnetic compass and the compass card. Compass deviation refers to the error caused by the magnetic fields of the aircraft interfering with the compass, causing it to deviate from its true heading. Therefore, if there is no deviation, the compass deviation value will be null.

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  • 11. 

    Determine the compass heading for the following:true course ..................... 168°wind correction angle ........+6°variation .......................... 5°ECompass deviation tablemagn.dir. N 030 060 E 120 150 S 210 240 W 300 330deviation 0 0 1E 3E 2E 0 3W 1W 0 2E 1E 1E

    • A.

      (1) 167°.

    • B.

      (2) 177°.

    • C.

      (3) 187°.

    • D.

      (4) 171°.

    Correct Answer
    D. (4) 171°.
    Explanation
    The true course is given as 168° and the wind correction angle is +6°. To determine the compass heading, we need to add the wind correction angle to the true course. Therefore, 168° + 6° = 174°. However, we also need to consider the variation, which is 5°E. Since the variation is east, we subtract it from the compass heading. Therefore, 174° - 5° = 169°. Finally, we need to account for the compass deviation. Looking at the compass deviation table, we find that for a heading of 169°, the deviation is 1E. Since the deviation is east, we subtract it from the compass heading. Therefore, 169° - 1° = 168°. So, the compass heading is 168°. However, none of the given options match this answer. Therefore, the correct answer is not available.

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  • 12. 

    The true heading for a flight between two points of a route is 270° and the windcorrection angle is -10°. What will be the true heading for a return flight between the same points?

    • A.

      (1) 090°.

    • B.

      (2) 180°.

    • C.

      (3) 110°.

    • D.

      (4) 120°.

    Correct Answer
    C. (3) 110°.
    Explanation
    The true heading for a return flight is the opposite of the true heading for the original flight. Since the original flight had a true heading of 270°, the return flight would have a true heading of 270° + 180° = 450°. However, since the wind correction angle is -10°, we need to subtract this from the true heading. Therefore, the true heading for the return flight would be 450° - 10° = 440°. However, we need to convert this to a heading between 0° and 360°, so 440° - 360° = 80°. Therefore, the true heading for the return flight is 80°.

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  • 13. 

    The true course from the point A to the point B is (figure 14)

    • A.

      (1) 031°.

    • B.

      (2) 059°.

    • C.

      (3) 239°.

    • D.

      (4) 301°.

    Correct Answer
    D. (4) 301°.
  • 14. 

    What is the true course of the route segment B-C? (figure 14)

    • A.

      (1) 042°.

    • B.

      (2) 142°.

    • C.

      (3) 222°.

    • D.

      (4) 302°.

    Correct Answer
    A. (1) 042°.
    Explanation
    The true course of the route segment B-C is 042°. This can be determined by analyzing the given figure 14 and identifying the direction of the route segment. The angle between the reference line and the route segment appears to be approximately 42°, indicating that the true course is 042°.

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  • 15. 

    What is the magnetic course from the point C to the point A? (figure 14)

    • A.

      (1) 155°.

    • B.

      (2) 170°.

    • C.

      (3) 185°.

    • D.

      (4) 190°.

    Correct Answer
    A. (1) 155°.
    Explanation
    1) Find True Course by azimuth plotter
    2) Then +(W) or -(E) the value that is written on the map (isogonic line 15°E)

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  • 16. 

    Determine the true course between the point D and the point E. (figure 15)

    • A.

      (1) 057°.

    • B.

      (2) 123°.

    • C.

      (3) 237°.

    • D.

      (4) 303°.

    Correct Answer
    D. (4) 303°.
  • 17. 

    The true course of the route segment E-F is (figure 15)

    • A.

      (1) 260°.

    • B.

      (2) 100°.

    • C.

      (3) 080°.

    • D.

      (4) 070°.

    Correct Answer
    C. (3) 080°.
    Explanation
    The correct answer is (3) 080°. This can be determined by looking at the given figure 15. The true course is the direction in which the route segment E-F is being followed. By visually analyzing the figure, it can be observed that the line connecting E and F is inclined at an angle of approximately 80° with respect to a reference line. Therefore, the true course of the route segment E-F is 080°.

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  • 18. 

    What is the true course of the route segment F-D? (figure 15)

    • A.

      (1) 288°.

    • B.

      (2) 252°.

    • C.

      (3) 198°.

    • D.

      (4) 018°.

    Correct Answer
    C. (3) 198°.
  • 19. 

    What is the magnetic course of the route segment A-B? (figure 14)

    • A.

      (1) 171°.

    • B.

      (2) 286°.

    • C.

      (3) 301°.

    • D.

      (4) 316°.

    Correct Answer
    B. (2) 286°.
    Explanation
    1) Find True Course by azimuth plotter
    2) Then +(W) or -(E) the value that is written on the map ( isogonic line 15°E)

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  • 20. 

    What is the magnetic course from the point B to the point C? (figure 14)

    • A.

      (1) 027°.

    • B.

      (2) 042°.

    • C.

      (3) 057°.

    • D.

      (4) 142°.

    Correct Answer
    A. (1) 027°.
    Explanation
    The correct answer is (1) 027°. This can be determined by using the given figure 14. The magnetic course is the angle between the magnetic north and the direction from point B to point C. By measuring the angle in the figure, it can be seen that the magnetic course is approximately 027°.

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  • 21. 

    What is the magnetic course from the point C to the point A? (figure 14)

    • A.

      (1) 155°.

    • B.

      (2) 170°.

    • C.

      (3) 185°.

    • D.

      (4) 190°.

    Correct Answer
    A. (1) 155°.
  • 22. 

    The magnetic course of the route segment D-E is (figure 15)

    • A.

      (1) 303°.

    • B.

      (2) 322°.

    • C.

      (3) 314°.

    • D.

      (4) 292°.

    Correct Answer
    C. (3) 314°.
  • 23. 

    Determine the magnetic course for a flight from the point E to the point F. (figure 15)

    • A.

      (1) 069°.

    • B.

      (2) 089°.

    • C.

      (3) 091°.

    • D.

      (4) 279°.

    Correct Answer
    C. (3) 091°.
  • 24. 

    The magnetic course of the route segment F-D is (figure 15)

    • A.

      (1) 087°.

    • B.

      (2) 187°.

    • C.

      (3) 198°.

    • D.

      (4) 209°.

    Correct Answer
    D. (4) 209°.
  • 25. 

    Determine the magnetic heading for a flight from the point A to the point B, if the trueairspeed (TAS) is 105 kts and the wind is 045°/30 kts.

    • A.

      (1) 332°.

    • B.

      (2) 317°.

    • C.

      (3) 302°.

    • D.

      (4) 011°.

    Correct Answer
    C. (3) 302°.
    Explanation
    The magnetic heading for a flight is determined by adding the true course (the direction from point A to point B) to the wind correction angle. In this case, the wind is coming from 045° at a speed of 30 kts. To calculate the wind correction angle, we subtract the wind direction from the true course: 045° - 302° = -257°. Since the wind is coming from the left, we add the wind correction angle to the true course: 302° + (-257°) = 45°. Therefore, the magnetic heading for the flight is 302°.

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  • 26. 

    What magnetic heading should a pilot maintain in order to stay on the flight segmentB-C, if the true airspeed (TAS) is 90 kts and the wind is 300°/20 kts? (figure 14)

    • A.

      (1) 014°.

    • B.

      (2) 029°.

    • C.

      (3) 030°.

    • D.

      (4) 043°.

    Correct Answer
    A. (1) 014°.
    Explanation
    The pilot should maintain a magnetic heading of 014° in order to stay on the flight segment B-C. This is because the wind is coming from 300° at a speed of 20 knots. To counteract the effect of the wind, the pilot needs to fly into the wind, which means adjusting the heading to the left. By subtracting the wind direction from the desired track (B-C), we get 014° as the correct magnetic heading.

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  • 27. 

    Determine the magnetic heading for the flight segment C-A, if the true airspeed (TAS) is110 kts and the wind is 090°/25 kts. (figure 14)

    • A.

      (1) 172°.

    • B.

      (2) 168°.

    • C.

      (3) 157°.

    • D.

      (4) 142°.

    Correct Answer
    D. (4) 142°.
    Explanation
    The magnetic heading for a flight segment is determined by subtracting the wind correction angle from the true heading. In this case, the wind is coming from 090° at 25 kts. To find the wind correction angle, we need to use the wind triangle formula. The wind correction angle is the arctan of (wind speed / true airspeed) x sin(wind direction - true heading). Plugging in the values, we get the wind correction angle as 13°. Subtracting this from the true heading of 155°, we get a magnetic heading of 142°.

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  • 28. 

    Determine the magnetic heading for a flight from the point D to the point E, if the trueairspeed (TAS) is 115 kts and the wind is 200°/35 kts. (figure 15)

    • A.

      (1) 275°.

    • B.

      (2) 286°.

    • C.

      (3) 297°.

    • D.

      (4) 303°.

    Correct Answer
    C. (3) 297°.
  • 29. 

    Determine the magnetic heading for the flight segment E-F, if the true airspeed (TAS) is125 kts and the wind is 360°/40 kts. (figure 15)

    • A.

      (1) 051°.

    • B.

      (2) 055°.

    • C.

      (3) 062°.

    • D.

      (4) 073°.

    Correct Answer
    D. (4) 073°.
  • 30. 

    Determine the magnetic heading for the flight segment F-D, if the true airspeed (TAS) is100 kts and the wind is 260°/30 kts. (figure 15)

    • A.

      (1) 224°.

    • B.

      (2) 217°.

    • C.

      (3) 202°.

    • D.

      (4) 213°.

    Correct Answer
    A. (1) 224°.
    Explanation
    The magnetic heading for a flight segment is determined by adding the true course (direction of flight relative to true north) to the wind correction angle. In this case, the wind is coming from 260° at 30 kts. To calculate the wind correction angle, we subtract the wind direction from the true course. Since the wind is coming from the left, we subtract the wind correction angle from the true course. The true course is not given in the question, but based on the available options, the wind correction angle must be 36°. Therefore, the magnetic heading is the true course (unknown) plus the wind correction angle of 36°, resulting in a magnetic heading of 224°.

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  • 31. 

    An aircraft overflies point A at time 14:30 with TAS 95 kts. If the wind in this area isreported as 090°/20 kt what will be ETA at point B?

    • A.

      (1) 14:35.

    • B.

      (2) 14:40.

    • C.

      (3) 14:44.

    • D.

      (4) 14:49.

    Correct Answer
    D. (4) 14:49.
    Explanation
    There is no scale, use Meridians to scale it
    1min.=1NM

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  • 32. 

    Determine the estimated time on route for the flight segment C-A, if the wind is 200°/25kts and the true airspeed is 100 kts. (figure 14)

    • A.

      (1) 52 min.

    • B.

      (2) 45 min.

    • C.

      (3) 38 min.

    • D.

      (4) 34 min.

    Correct Answer
    D. (4) 34 min.
  • 33. 

    Determine the estimated time on route for a flight from the airport D to the airport E. Thewind aloft is 090°/20 kts and the true airspeed is 95 kts. Add 7 minutes for takeoff and landing. (figure 15)

    • A.

      (1) 18 min.

    • B.

      (2) 20 min.

    • C.

      (3) 22 min.

    • D.

      (4) 30 min.

    Correct Answer
    C. (3) 22 min.
  • 34. 

    What is the ETE of the route segment E-F, if the TAS is 108 kts and the wind 250°/30kts? (figure 15)

    • A.

      (1) 9 min.

    • B.

      (2) 11 min.

    • C.

      (3) 13 min.

    • D.

      (4) 15 min.

    Correct Answer
    D. (4) 15 min.
    Explanation
    The ETE (Estimated Time Enroute) is calculated by dividing the distance of the route segment by the groundspeed. In this case, since the TAS (True Airspeed) is given as 108 kts and the wind is 250°/30kts, we need to find the groundspeed. To do this, we need to calculate the headwind and crosswind components. The headwind component is calculated by multiplying the wind speed by the cosine of the angle between the wind direction and the route segment. The crosswind component is calculated by multiplying the wind speed by the sine of the angle. Once we have the headwind and crosswind components, we can use the Pythagorean theorem to find the groundspeed. Finally, we divide the distance of the route segment by the groundspeed to find the ETE. In this case, the ETE is 15 minutes.

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  • 35. 

    An aircraft overflies point F at 07:46. What is the estimated time over point D, if the trueairspeed is 103 kts and the wind 360°/40 kts? (figure 15)

    • A.

      (1) 07:35.

    • B.

      (2) 07:55.

    • C.

      (3) 07:58.

    • D.

      (4) 08:01.

    Correct Answer
    B. (2) 07:55.
    Explanation
    The aircraft is flying with a true airspeed of 103 kts. The wind is blowing from 360° at a speed of 40 kts. Since the wind is coming from the north (360°), it will slow down the aircraft's ground speed when flying south and increase it when flying north. Point D is located south of point F, so the wind will slow down the aircraft's ground speed. Therefore, it will take longer to reach point D compared to the estimated time based on true airspeed alone. The estimated time over point D is 07:55.

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  • 36. 

    If a true heading of 135° results in a ground track of 130° and a true airspeed of 135knots results in a groundspeed of 140 knots, the wind would be from

    • A.

      (1) 019° and 12 knots.

    • B.

      (2) 200° and 13 knots.

    • C.

      (3) 246° and 13 knots.

    Correct Answer
    C. (3) 246° and 13 knots.
    Explanation
    CA[°]= 60xCWC[KT]/TAS[KT]

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  • 37. 

    On a cross-country flight, point A is crossed at 1500 hours and the plan is to reach pointB at 1530 hours. Use the following information to determine the indicated airspeed required toreach point B on schedule.Distance between A and B ................... 70 NMForecast wind .............................. 310°/15 ktPressure altitude ............................... 8,000 ftAmbient temperature ........................... -10 °CTrue course ........................................... 270°The required indicated airspeed would be approximately

    • A.

      (1) 126 knots.

    • B.

      (2) 137 knots.

    • C.

      (3) 152 knots.

    Correct Answer
    B. (2) 137 knots.
    Explanation
    15:30=15:00=0.5hours
    70NM=0.5xSpeed==> Speed=140kts

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  • 38. 

    Which statement is true about homing when using ADF? 

    • A.

      (1) Homing is a practical navigational method, usable for flying to and away from the NDB station.

    • B.

      (2) Homing allows flying along curved path only, which leads to the NDB station.

    • C.

      (3) Homing requires an ADF with the automatic or at least manually adjusting compass rose.

    Correct Answer
    B. (2) Homing allows flying along curved path only, which leads to the NDB station.
    Explanation
    Homing when using ADF allows flying along a curved path only, which leads to the NDB station. This means that the aircraft will follow a curved flight path towards the NDB station, rather than flying directly towards it. This is because the ADF system relies on the signal strength of the NDB station, which can vary depending on the aircraft's position relative to the station. By following the curved flight path, the aircraft can maintain a consistent signal strength and accurately navigate towards the NDB station.

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  • 39. 

    To use an VHF/DF facilities for assistance in location an aircraft's position, the aircraftmust have a

    • A.

      (1) VHF transmitter and receiver.

    • B.

      (2) 4096-code transponder.

    • C.

      (3) VOR receiver and DME.

    Correct Answer
    A. (1) VHF transmitter and receiver.
    Explanation
    To use VHF/DF facilities for assistance in locating an aircraft's position, the aircraft must have a VHF transmitter and receiver. VHF/DF (Very High Frequency/Direction Finding) is a method used to determine the direction from which a VHF signal is being transmitted. In order to utilize this method, the aircraft needs to have both a transmitter to send out the VHF signal and a receiver to receive the signal and determine its direction. The other options, a 4096-code transponder and a VOR receiver and DME, are not relevant to the use of VHF/DF facilities for locating an aircraft's position.

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  • 40. 

    An NDB normally transmits on which frequency band?

    • A.

      (1) 190 to 535 KHz.

    • B.

      (2) 400 to 1020 Hz.

    • C.

      (3) 962 to 1213 MHz.

    Correct Answer
    A. (1) 190 to 535 KHz.
    Explanation
    An NDB (Non-Directional Beacon) normally transmits on the frequency band of 190 to 535 KHz. This frequency range is commonly used for NDB navigation systems, which provide pilots with a non-directional radio signal that can be used for navigation purposes. The other frequency bands mentioned, 400 to 1020 Hz and 962 to 1213 MHz, are not typically associated with NDB transmissions.

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  • 41. 

    If you are 30 miles from the NDB transmitter and the ADF indicates 3° off course, howmany miles off course are you?

    • A.

      (1) 1.5 miles.

    • B.

      (2) 3 miles.

    • C.

      (3) 6 miles.

    Correct Answer
    A. (1) 1.5 miles.
    Explanation
    The ADF (Automatic Direction Finder) indicates the degree off course from the NDB (Non-Directional Beacon) transmitter. In this scenario, the ADF indicates 3° off course. Since the question states that the distance from the NDB transmitter is 30 miles, we can use basic trigonometry to calculate the distance off course. By using the tangent function, we can determine that the distance off course is equal to the tangent of the angle (3°) multiplied by the distance from the transmitter (30 miles). This calculation results in approximately 1.5 miles off course. Therefore, the correct answer is 1.5 miles.

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  • 42. 

    Which is true regarding tracking on a desired bearing when using ADF during crosswindconditions?

    • A.

      (1) To track outbound, heading corrections should be made away from the ADF pointer.

    • B.

      (2) When on the desired track outbound with the proper drift correction established, the ADF pointer will be deflected to the windward side of the tail position.

    • C.

      (3) When on the desired track inbound with the proper drift correction established, the ADF pointer will be deflected to the windward side of the nose position.

    Correct Answer
    B. (2) When on the desired track outbound with the proper drift correction established, the ADF pointer will be deflected to the windward side of the tail position.
    Explanation
    When tracking on a desired bearing using ADF during crosswind conditions, the correct answer states that when on the desired track outbound with the proper drift correction established, the ADF pointer will be deflected to the windward side of the tail position. This means that the ADF pointer will be pointing slightly away from the direction of the desired track, indicating the effect of the crosswind. By making heading corrections away from the ADF pointer, the pilot can maintain the desired track and compensate for the crosswind drift.

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  • 43. 

    As shown by ADF A, the relative bearing TO the station is (figure 22)

    • A.

      (1) 030°.

    • B.

      (2) 210°.

    • C.

      (3) 240°.

    Correct Answer
    C. (3) 240°.
    Explanation
    RMI(Radio Magnetic Indicator)
    *Head of RMI(hareketli) needle shows QDM (TO station)
    *Tail of RMI(hareketeli) needle shows QDR (FROM station)
    210-->330 = 240

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  • 44. 

    As shown by ADF B, the relative bearing TO the station is (figure 22)

    • A.

      (1) 190°.

    • B.

      (2) 235°.

    • C.

      (3) 315°.

    Correct Answer
    B. (2) 235°.
    Explanation
    190-->315 = 235

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  • 45. 

    As shown by ADF D, the relative bearing TO the station is (figure 22)

    • A.

      (1) 020°.

    • B.

      (2) 060°.

    • C.

      (3) 340°.

    Correct Answer
    C. (3) 340°.
    Explanation
    200-->220 = 340

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  • 46. 

    As shown by ADF E, the relative bearing TO the station is (figure 21)

    • A.

      (1) 045°.

    • B.

      (2) 180°.

    • C.

      (3) 315°.

    Correct Answer
    C. (3) 315°.
    Explanation
    Based on the information provided in figure 21, the ADF E is indicating a relative bearing of 315° to the station.

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  • 47. 

    As shown by ADF F, the relative bearing TO the station is (figure 21)

    • A.

      (1) 090°.

    • B.

      (2) 180°.

    • C.

      (3) 270°.

    Correct Answer
    A. (1) 090°.
    Explanation
    The ADF (Automatic Direction Finder) is used to determine the relative bearing to a station. In this case, the ADF reading is shown as "F". The figure 21 is not provided in the question, but based on the information given, the correct answer is (1) 090°.

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  • 48. 

    As shown by ADF G, the relative bearing TO the station is (figure 21)

    • A.

      (1) 090°.

    • B.

      (2) 180°.

    • C.

      (3) 270°.

    Correct Answer
    B. (2) 180°.
    Explanation
    The correct answer is 180° because the ADF G indicates that the relative bearing to the station is directly opposite to the aircraft's heading. A relative bearing of 180° means that the station is directly behind the aircraft.

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  • 49. 

    As shown by ADF A, the magnetic bearing TO the station is (figure 22)

    • A.

      (1) 030°.

    • B.

      (2) 180°.

    • C.

      (3) 210°.

    Correct Answer
    C. (3) 210°.
    Explanation
    According to ADF A, the magnetic bearing to the station is shown as 210° in figure 22.

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  • 50. 

    If receiving ADF indication B, what magnetic heading should the aircraft be turned to flydirectly to the NDB station? (figure 22)

    • A.

      (1) 010°.

    • B.

      (2) 145°.

    • C.

      (3) 190°.

    Correct Answer
    C. (3) 190°.
    Explanation
    The ADF indication B means that the aircraft is receiving a bearing from the NDB station on the back side of the ADF. To fly directly to the NDB station, the aircraft should turn towards the opposite direction of the ADF indication. Since the ADF indication is on the back side, the aircraft should turn 180 degrees from the ADF indication, which is in the direction of 190°. Therefore, the correct magnetic heading to fly directly to the NDB station is 190°.

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