Prose MCQ Quiz

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Quizzes Created: 10 | Total Attempts: 4,699
Questions: 10 | Attempts: 2,457

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Prose MCQ Quiz - Quiz

Do you love reading prose? What about an amazing prose MCQ quiz? Prose is understood as a form of written or spoken language that typically shows a natural flow of speech and grammatical structure. A related narrative device is known as the stream of consciousness, which also flows naturally but is not concerned with syntax. How much do you know about prose reading? Find out by playing this quiz. All the best!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    "The Kiss" by Kate Chopin It was still quite light out of doors, but inside with the curtains drawn and the smoldering fire sending out a dim, uncertain glow, the room was full of deep shadows.   Brantain sat in one of these shadows; it had overtaken him, and he did not mind. The obscurity lent him the courage to keep his eyes fastened as ardently as he liked upon the girl who sat in the firelight.   She was very handsome, with a certain fine, rich coloring that belongs to the healthy brune type. She was quite composed as she idly stroked the satiny coat of the cat that lay curled in her lap, and she occasionally sent a slow glance into the shadow where her companion sat. They were talking low, of indifferent things which plainly were not the things that occupied their thoughts. She knew that he loved her—a frank, blustering fellow without guile enough to conceal his feelings and no desire to do so. For two weeks past, he had sought her society eagerly and persistently. She was confidently waiting for him to declare himself, and she meant to accept him. The rather insignificant and unattractive Brantain was enormously rich, and she liked and required the entourage that wealth could give her.   During one of the pauses between their talk of the last tea and the next reception, the door opened, and a young man entered whom Brantain knew quite well. The girl turned her face toward him. A stride or two brought him to her side, and bending over her chair—before she could suspect his intention, for she did not realize that he had not seen her visitor—he pressed an ardent, lingering kiss upon her lips.   Brantain slowly arose; so did the girl arise, but quickly, and the newcomer stood between them, a little amusement and some defiance struggling with the confusion in his face.   "I believe," stammered Brantain, "I see that I have stayed too long. I—I had no idea—that is, I must wish you good-by." He was clutching his hat with both hands and probably did not perceive that she was extending her hand to him, her presence of mind had not completely deserted her, but she could not have trusted herself to speak.   "Hang me if I saw him sitting there, Nattie! I know it's deuced awkward for you. But I hope you'll forgive me this once—this very first break. Why, what's the matter?"   "Don't touch me; don't come near me," she returned angrily. "What do you mean by entering the house without ringing?"   "I came in with your brother, as I often do," he answered coldly in self-justification. "We came in a side way. He went upstairs, and I came in here hoping to find you. The explanation is simple enough and ought to satisfy you that the misadventure was unavoidable. But do say that you forgive me, Nathalie," he entreated, softening.   "Forgive you! You don't know what you are talking about. Let me pass. It depends upon—a good deal whether I ever forgive you."   At that next reception which she and Brantain had been talking about, she approached the young man with a delicious frankness of manner when she saw him there.   "Will you let me speak to you a moment or two, Mr. Brantain?" she asked with an engaging but perturbed smile. He seemed extremely unhappy, but when she took his arm and walked away with him, seeking a retired corner, a ray of hope mingled with the almost comical misery of his expression. She was apparently very outspoken.   "Perhaps I should not have sought this interview, Mr. Brantain; but—but, oh, I have been very uncomfortable, almost miserable since that little encounter the other afternoon. When I thought how you might have misinterpreted it, and believed things"—hope was plainly gaining the ascendancy over misery in Brantain's round, guileless face—"Of course, I know it is nothing to you, but for my own sake, I do want you to understand Mr. Harvy is an intimate friend of long standing. Why, we have always been like cousins—brother and sister, I may say. He is my brother's most intimate associate and often fancies that he is entitled to the same privileges as the family. Oh, I know it is absurd, uncalled for, to tell you this; undignified even," she was almost weeping, "but it makes so much difference to me what you think of—of me." Her voice had grown very low and agitated. The misery had all disappeared from Brantain's face.   "Then you do really care what I think, Miss Nathalie? May I call you Miss Nathalie?" They turned into a long, dim corridor that was lined on either side with tall, graceful plants. They walked slowly to the very end of it. When they turned to retrace their steps, Brantain's face was radiant, and hers was triumphant.   Harvy was among the guests at the wedding, and he sought her out in a rare moment when she stood alone.   "Your husband," he said, smiling, "has sent me over to kiss you."   A quick blush suffused her face and round polished throat. "I suppose it's natural for a man to feel and act generously on an occasion of this kind. He tells me he doesn't want his marriage to interrupt wholly that pleasant intimacy that has existed between you and me. I don't know what you've been telling him," with an insolent smile, "but he has sent me here to kiss you."   She felt like a chess player who, by the clever handling of his pieces, sees the game taking the course intended. Her eyes were bright and tender with a smile as they glanced up into his, and her lips looked hungry for the kiss which they invited.   "But, you know," he went on quietly, "I didn't tell him so, it would have seemed ungrateful, but I can tell you. I've stopped kissing women; it's dangerous." Well, she had Brantain and his million left. A person can't have everything in this world, and it was a little unreasonable of her to expect it. 

  • 2. 

    The imagery in the opening paragraph ("uncertain glow," "deep shadows") creates what type of atmosphere?

    • A.

      Lustful

    • B.

      Romantic

    • C.

      Morose

    • D.

      Solemn

    • E.

      Surreptitious

    Correct Answer
    E. Surreptitious
    Explanation
    The imagery of "uncertain glow" and "deep shadows" suggests a secretive and hidden atmosphere. This creates a surreptitious atmosphere, where things are concealed or done in a sneaky manner.

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  • 3. 

    Brantian, as opposed to Mr. Harvy, is

    • A.

      A philanderer

    • B.

      Penurious

    • C.

      Libidinous

    • D.

      Meek

    • E.

      Astute

    Correct Answer
    D. Meek
    Explanation
    The word "meek" means being submissive or humble in nature. In this context, the statement suggests that Brantian is meek, while Mr. Harvy is not. This implies that Brantian is more submissive or humble compared to Mr. Harvy.

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  • 4. 

    Lines 15 - 16 uncover Nathalie's

    • A.

      Indifference

    • B.

      Ardor

    • C.

      Frankness

    • D.

      Opportunism

    • E.

      Venality

    Correct Answer
    D. Opportunism
    Explanation
    Lines 15-16 reveal Nathalie's opportunism. This suggests that Nathalie is willing to take advantage of any opportunity that presents itself, regardless of any moral or ethical considerations. She is likely to prioritize her own personal gain and benefit, even if it means disregarding the well-being or interests of others.

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  • 5. 

    The phrase "deuced awkward" (31) is an example of

    • A.

      An oxymoron

    • B.

      A paradox

    • C.

      A colloquialism

    • D.

      A malapropism

    • E.

      Slander

    Correct Answer
    C. A colloquialism
    Explanation
    The phrase "deuced awkward" is an example of a colloquialism. Colloquialisms are informal expressions or phrases that are commonly used in everyday conversation or informal writing. In this case, "deuced awkward" is a colloquial way of saying something is very awkward or uncomfortable. It is not an oxymoron, paradox, malapropism, or slander, as those terms refer to different linguistic devices or forms of speech.

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  • 6. 

    In context, Nathalie's "delicious frankness" of manner (44) implies 

    • A.

      She is extremely frank

    • B.

      She is amorous to Brantain

    • C.

      She is ambivalent about Braintain

    • D.

      She is ever to mollify Brantain

    • E.

      She is more wily than frank

    Correct Answer
    E. She is more wily than frank
    Explanation
    The phrase "delicious frankness" suggests that Nathalie's frankness is not just straightforward and honest, but also enjoyable and pleasing. This implies that her frankness is not just a result of her being extremely honest, but also a calculated and strategic approach. Therefore, the answer "she is more wily than frank" is the most appropriate explanation for the given statement. It implies that Nathalie's frankness is not purely genuine, but rather a clever and cunning way of manipulating others.

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  • 7. 

    In context, the word "triumphant" (66) contributes most to

    • A.

      Imagery

    • B.

      The characterization of Nathalie

    • C.

      Tone

    • D.

      The characterization of Brantain

    • E.

      Mood

    Correct Answer
    B. The characterization of Nathalie
    Explanation
    The word "triumphant" suggests that Nathalie is portrayed as victorious or successful in some way. This implies that she has achieved something significant or overcome a challenge, which contributes to her characterization as a strong and capable individual.

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  • 8. 

    The phrase "Her eyes were bright and tender with a smile ..." (76) suggests that Nathalie.

    • A.

      Is still thinking about Braintain

    • B.

      Is torn between her love for Braintain and for Mr. Harvy

    • C.

      Is also interested primarily in Mr. Harvy's riches

    • D.

      Is guileful in her interactions with men

    • E.

      May have a genuine romantic interest in Mr. Harvy

    Correct Answer
    E. May have a genuine romantic interest in Mr. Harvy
    Explanation
    The phrase "Her eyes were bright and tender with a smile" suggests that Nathalie may have a genuine romantic interest in Mr. Harvy. This description implies that she is attracted to him and shows affection through her eyes and smile. It indicates a positive and warm emotional response towards Mr. Harvy, which is often associated with romantic interest.

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  • 9. 

    The simile in lines 75 - 76 coincides more with which other phrase?

    • A.

      "Brantain's face was radiant, and hers was triumphant" (66)

    • B.

      "She was very handsome" (7)

    • C.

      "Don't touch me; don't come near me" (34)

    • D.

      "but it makes so much difference to me what you think of - of me" (60 - 61)

    • E.

      "Her voice had grown very low and agitated" (61)

    Correct Answer
    A. "Brantain's face was radiant, and hers was triumphant" (66)
    Explanation
    The simile in lines 75-76 compares the radiant expression on Brantain's face to the triumphant expression on the woman's face. This suggests that the woman's face also had a triumphant expression, emphasizing her satisfaction or sense of victory in the situation. This phrase is the most similar to the simile because it also describes the woman's facial expression, highlighting her emotional state.

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  • 10. 

    In the phrase " A person can't have everything in this world" (80 - 81), the word "everything" refers to

    • A.

      Unrequited affection

    • B.

      Having every man's attention

    • C.

      Kissing Mr. Harvy

    • D.

      Having her emotional and financial needs met

    • E.

      "Brantain and his millions."

    Correct Answer
    D. Having her emotional and financial needs met
    Explanation
    The phrase "A person can't have everything in this world" implies that there are limitations to what one can possess or achieve. In this context, the word "everything" refers to having all of one's emotional and financial needs met. It suggests that it is unrealistic to expect to have complete fulfillment in both areas, indicating that the person may have to make compromises or prioritize one over the other.

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  • 11. 

    Lines 80 - 81 are written in which narrative style?

    • A.

      Third person limited

    • B.

      First person

    • C.

      Stream of consciousness

    • D.

      Third person rotating

    • E.

      Free indirect style

    Correct Answer
    E. Free indirect style
    Explanation
    The correct answer is free indirect style. Free indirect style is a narrative technique where the thoughts and feelings of a character are presented indirectly, blending the character's perspective with the third-person narrator's voice. In this style, the narrator provides a subjective and intimate view of the character's thoughts, blurring the line between the character's voice and the narrator's voice. This style allows for a deeper understanding of the character's emotions and motivations.

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