Reading Comprehension Conclusion Quiz

6 Questions | Total Attempts: 662

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Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    The study of history provides many benefits. First, we learn from the past. We may repeat mistakes, but, at least, we have the opportunity to avoid them. Second, history teaches us what questions to ask about the present. Contrary to some people’s view, the study of history is not the memorization of names, dates, and places. It is the thoughtful examination of the forces that have shaped the courses of human life. We can examine events from the past and then draw inferences about current events. History teaches us about likely outcomes.  Another benefit of the study of history is the broad range of human experience which is covered. War and peace are certainly covered as are national and international affairs. However, matters of culture (art, literature, and music) are also included in historical study. Human nature is an important part of history: emotions like passion, greed, and insecurity have influenced the shaping of world affairs. Anyone who thinks that the study of history is boring has not really studied history.What is the main idea of this passage?
    • A. 

      Studying history helps us to live in today’s world.

    • B. 

      Studying history is riot just memorization.

    • C. 

      The role of education is to help students deal with real life.

    • D. 

      Students should study both national and international history.

  • 2. 
    All water molecules form six-sided structures as they freeze and become snow crystals. The shape of a snow crystal is determined by temperature, vapor, and wind conditions in the upper atmosphere. A snow crystal is always symmetrical because these conditions affect all six of its sides simultaneously.The purpose of the passage is to present 
    • A. 

      A personal observation

    • B. 

      A solution to a problem

    • C. 

      Factual information

    • D. 

      Opposing scientific theories

  • 3. 
      In the words of Thomas De Quincey, “It is notorious that the memory strengthens as you lay burdens upon it.” If, like most people, you have trouble recalling the names of those you have just met, try this: The next time you are introduced, plan to remember the names. Say to yourself, “I’ll listen carefully; I’ll repeat each person’s name to be sure I have it, and I will remember.” You’ll discover how effective this technique is and probably recall those names for the rest of your life.The passage suggests that people remember names best when they
    • A. 

      Meet new people

    • B. 

      Are intelligent

    • C. 

      Decide to do so

    • D. 

      Are interested in people

  • 4. 
    Many people have owned, or have heard of, traditional “piggy banks,” coin banks shaped like pigs. A logical theory about how this tradition started might be that because pigs often symbolize greed, the object is to “fatten” one’s piggy bank with as much money as possible. However, while this idea makes sense, it is not the correct origin of the term. The genesis of the piggy bank is the old English word “pygg,” which was a common kind of clay hundreds of years ago in England. People used pots and jars made out of this red “pygg” clay for many different purposes in their homes. Sometimes they kept their money in one of the pots, and this was known as a pygg bank. Over the years, because “pygg” and “pig” sounded the same, glaziers began making novelty banks out of pottery in the shape of a pig as a kind of joke. These banks were given as gifts and exported to countries where people spoke other languages and where no one had ever heard of pygg clay. The tradition caught on all over the world, and today piggy banks come in all colors and are made of all kinds of materials, including plastic. This passage is mainly about how 
    • A. 

      People in different countries save their money

    • B. 

      People in England made pottery centuries ago

    • C. 

      A common term originated in a surprising way

    • D. 

      an unusual custom got started

  • 5. 
      Samuel Morse, best known today as the inventor of Morse Code and one of the inventors of the telegraph, was originally a prominent painter. While he was always interested in technology and studied electrical engineering in college, Morse went to Paris to learn from famous artists of his day and later painted many pictures that now hang in museums, including a portrait of former President John Adams. In 1825, Morse was in Washington, D.C., painting a portrait of the Marquis de Lafayette when a messenger arrived on horseback to tell him that his wife was gravely ill back at his home in Connecticut. The message had taken several days to reach him because of the distance. Morse rushed to his home as fast as he could, but his wife had already passed away by the time he arrived. Grief-stricken, he gave up painting and devoted the rest of his life to finding ways to transmit messages over long distances faster.Morse left the art world and helped to invent the telegraph because he 
    • A. 

      Was tired of painting

    • B. 

      Wanted to communicate with people far away

    • C. 

      Experienced a personal tragedy in his life

    • D. 

      Was fascinated by science

  • 6. 
    Leonardo da Vinci is not only one of the most famous artists in history, but he was also a botanist, a writer, and an inventor. Even though most of his inventions were not actually built in his lifetime, many of today’s modern machines can be traced back to some of his original designs. The parachute, the military tank, the bicycle, and even the airplane were foretold in the imaginative drawings that can still be seen in the fragments of da Vinci’s notebooks. Over 500 years ago, this man conceived ideas that were far ahead of his time.The author of this passage is praising da Vinci primarily for his
    • A. 

      Artistic talent

    • B. 

      Intelligence

    • C. 

      Foresight

    • D. 

      Fame

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