English II Literary Terms Test - Mr. Smith

20 Questions | Total Attempts: 80

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English Quizzes & Trivia

Regardless of the job role or industry you work, having literacy skills is a fundamental requirement. Literacy is the ability to use written language actively and passively. Test your basic understanding of English literature using the simple and quick quiz below. All the best, share your results with friends.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Big Bad Bryan is back in town.
    • A. 

      Assonance

    • B. 

      Alliteration

    • C. 

      Consonance

    • D. 

      Personification

  • 2. 
    I've been to the dentist many times, so I know the drill. 
    • A. 

      Imagery

    • B. 

      Plot

    • C. 

      Euphemism

    • D. 

      Pun

  • 3. 
    Good going Einstein
    • A. 

      Dramatic irony

    • B. 

      Situational irony

    • C. 

      Verbal irony

    • D. 

      Simile

  • 4. 
    Rick is an animal guarding Jim on the basketball court.
    • A. 

      Metaphor

    • B. 

      Similie

    • C. 

      Assonance

    • D. 

      Oxymoron

  • 5. 
    He's so fluffy, I'm gonna die!
    • A. 

      Personification

    • B. 

      Alliteration

    • C. 

      Hyperbole

    • D. 

      Similie

  • 6. 
    Throughout most of The Lion King, Simba mopes around feeling guilty for his father’s death, unaware (as the audience is) that Scar actually killed Mufasa.
    • A. 

      Dramatic irony

    • B. 

      Situational irony

    • C. 

      Verbal irony

    • D. 

      Personification

  • 7. 
    In The Hunchback of Notre Dame, the gargoyle Laverne tells a flock of pigeons to “Fly my pretties! Fly, Fly!” à la the Wicked Witch of the West in The Wizard of Oz.
    • A. 

      Illusion

    • B. 

      Allusion

    • C. 

      Metaphor

    • D. 

      Satire

  • 8. 
    Before she’s fatally shot by a hunter (and millions of childhoods are scarred), Bambi’s mother gives Bambi a stern lecture on the dangers of man.
    • A. 

      Personification

    • B. 

      Resolution

    • C. 

      Foreshadowing

    • D. 

      Flashback

  • 9. 
    At the beginning of Robin Hood, the rooster Alan-a-Dale describes how Robin Hood has been robbing from the rich to give to Nottingham’s poor.
    • A. 

      Mood

    • B. 

      Setting

    • C. 

      Resolution

    • D. 

      Exposition

  • 10. 
    Mr. Smith's belt screamed after lunch.
    • A. 

      Allusion

    • B. 

      Simile

    • C. 

      Metaphor

    • D. 

      Personification

  • 11. 
    Different version of a song.
    • A. 

      Parody

    • B. 

      Allusion

    • C. 

      Hyperbole

    • D. 

      Irony

  • 12. 
    My car is pretty ugly.
    • A. 

      Euphemism

    • B. 

      Oxymoron

    • C. 

      Irony

    • D. 

      Hyperbole

  • 13. 
    A speaker or writer’s choice of words.
    • A. 

      Diction

    • B. 

      Connotation

    • C. 

      Denotation

    • D. 

      Symbolism

  • 14. 
    The author reveals to the reader what the character is like by describing how the character looks and dresses, by letting the reader hear what the character says, by revealing the character’s private thoughts and feelings, by revealing the characters effect on other people (showing how other characters feel or behave toward the character), or by showing the character in action. Common in modern literature
    • A. 

      Irony

    • B. 

      Situational irony

    • C. 

      Direct characterization

    • D. 

      Indirect characterization

  • 15. 
    An atmosphere created by a writer’s diction and the details selected.
    • A. 

      Tone

    • B. 

      Setting

    • C. 

      Mood

    • D. 

      Style

  • 16. 
    One of the characters tells the story
    • A. 

      Third person point of view

    • B. 

      First person point of view

    • C. 

      Objective point of view

    • D. 

      Omniscient point of view

  • 17. 
    He ran down the road, and she followed close behind him.
    • A. 

      Third person point of view

    • B. 

      First person point of view

    • C. 

      Second person point of view

    • D. 

      No point of view

  • 18. 
    Author’s attitude/emotions that come through the story
    • A. 

      Satire

    • B. 

      Mood

    • C. 

      Tone

    • D. 

      Inference

  • 19. 
    Snap, crackle, pop
    • A. 

      Onomatopoeia

    • B. 

      Alliteration

    • C. 

      Assonance

    • D. 

      Personification

  • 20. 
    An implied meaning that is associated with a word in addition to its literal meaning
    • A. 

      Denotation

    • B. 

      Connotation

    • C. 

      Hyperbole

    • D. 

      Diction