Romeo & Juliet Literary Terms

36 Questions | Total Attempts: 113

SettingsSettingsSettings
Please wait...
Romeo & Juliet Literary Terms

Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    A reference in one work of literature to a person, place, or event in another work of literature or in history, art, or music.
    • A. 

      Symbol

    • B. 

      Irony

    • C. 

      Allusion

  • 2. 
    An extended comparison showing the similarities between two things.
    • A. 

      Analogy

    • B. 

      Epithet

    • C. 

      Pun

  • 3. 
    The character or force that works against the protagonist; introduces the conflict.
    • A. 

      Metaphor

    • B. 

      Soliloquy

    • C. 

      Antagonist

  • 4. 
    Words spoken by a character in a play, usually undertone and intended for the audience but not other characters in play.
    • A. 

      Symbol

    • B. 

      Aside

    • C. 

      Dramatic structure

  • 5. 
    Iambic pentameter with no rhyme.
    • A. 

      Blank verse

    • B. 

      Foil

    • C. 

      Sonnet

  • 6. 
    The personality a character displays; also, the means by which the author reveals the personality.
    • A. 

      Protagonist

    • B. 

      Characterization

    • C. 

      Monologue

  • 7. 
    The point of greatest emotional intensity, interest, or suspense in a narrative.
    • A. 

      Climax

    • B. 

      Irony

    • C. 

      Theme

  • 8. 
    A struggle (between opposing forces or characters)
    • A. 

      Allusion

    • B. 

      Motivation

    • C. 

      Conflict

  • 9. 
    Two consecutive lines of poetry that rhyme.
    • A. 

      Iambic pentameter

    • B. 

      Couplet

    • C. 

      Metaphor

  • 10. 
    A writer's choice of words for clarity, effectiveness, and precision.
    • A. 

      Diction

    • B. 

      Dramatic structure

    • C. 

      Oxymoron

  • 11. 
    A contrast between what the audience perceives and what a character does not know.
    • A. 

      Suspense

    • B. 

      Imagery

    • C. 

      Dramatic irony

  • 12. 
    The structure of a play.
    • A. 

      Dramatic structure

    • B. 

      Sonnet

    • C. 

      Climax

  • 13. 
    A descriptive adjective or phrase used to characterize someone or something.
    • A. 

      Aside

    • B. 

      Epithet

    • C. 

      Theme

  • 14. 
    Language that is not intended to be interpreted to a literal sense.
    • A. 

      Figurative language

    • B. 

      Couplet

    • C. 

      Verbal irony

  • 15. 
    A character who sets off another character by contrast.
    • A. 

      Antagonist

    • B. 

      Soliloquy

    • C. 

      Foil

  • 16. 
    The use of hints or clues in a narrative to suggest what action is to come.
    • A. 

      Dramatic irony

    • B. 

      Foreshadowing

    • C. 

      Blank verse

  • 17. 
    Unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable.
    • A. 

      Diction

    • B. 

      Repetition

    • C. 

      Iambic meter

  • 18. 
    Five verse feet with each foot an iamb (a total of ten syllables).
    • A. 

      Iambic pentameter

    • B. 

      Blank verse

    • C. 

      Simile

  • 19. 
    Language that appeals to any sense (sight, hearing, taste, touch, or smell) or any combination of these senses.
    • A. 

      Allusion

    • B. 

      Imagery

    • C. 

      Epithet

  • 20. 
    Literary technique that portrays differences between appearances and reality.
    • A. 

      Sonnet

    • B. 

      Characterization

    • C. 

      Irony

  • 21. 
    Comparison between two unlike things with the intent of giving added meaning to one of them.
    • A. 

      Metaphor

    • B. 

      Foil

    • C. 

      Aside

  • 22. 
    A reason that explains or partially explains why a character thinks, feels, acts, or behaves in a certain way.
    • A. 

      Pun

    • B. 

      Motivation

    • C. 

      Theme

  • 23. 
    The main character in a play or story.
    • A. 

      Protagonist

    • B. 

      Antagonist

    • C. 

      Figurative language

  • 24. 
    The humorous use of a word or phrase to suggest two or more meanings at the same time.
    • A. 

      Personification

    • B. 

      Pun

    • C. 

      Foreshadowing

  • 25. 
    The return of a word, phrase, stanza form, or effect in any form of literature.
    • A. 

      Soliloquy

    • B. 

      Simile

    • C. 

      Repetition

Related Topics
Back to Top Back to top