Quiz: Literary Terms Multiple Choice Test

85 Questions | Total Attempts: 5465

SettingsSettingsSettings
Please wait...
Literary Terms Quizzes & Trivia

Literary terms refer to those techniques, style, and formatting used mostly by authors, bloggers, speakers to emphasize and strengthen their compositions in a unique and beautiful way. These terms can be words, phrases, figurative language, etc. So, this quiz is all about literary terms, let's see if you enough to pass this test or not.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Means "advance guard" or "vanguard" and is used to refer to people or works that are experimental or innovative, particularly with respect to art, culture, and politics.
    • A. 

      Anachronism

    • B. 

      Catharsis

    • C. 

      Avant-garde

    • D. 

      Vernacular

  • 2. 
    A repition of sentences using the same structure.
    • A. 

      Adage

    • B. 

      Parallel Structure

    • C. 

      Aphorism

    • D. 

      Pastoral

  • 3. 
    The structure of a story; the sequence in which the author arranges events in a story; the structure of a five-act play often includes the rising action, the climax, the falling action, and the resolution.
    • A. 

      Pathetic Fallacy

    • B. 

      Verisimilitude

    • C. 

      Allusion

    • D. 

      Plot

  • 4. 
    A statement which can contain two or more meanings.
    • A. 

      Ambiguity

    • B. 

      Anecdote

    • C. 

      Epigraph

    • D. 

      Foil

  • 5. 
    The emotional content of a word.
    • A. 

      Connotation

    • B. 

      Figurative Language

    • C. 

      Denotation

    • D. 

      Epic

  • 6. 
    The dictionary definition of a word.
    • A. 

      Conotation

    • B. 

      Figure of Speech

    • C. 

      Denotation

    • D. 

      Epithet

  • 7. 
    A mild word or phrase which substitues for another which would be undesirable because it is too direct, unpleasant, or offensive.
    • A. 

      Euphemism

    • B. 

      Genre

    • C. 

      Point of View

    • D. 

      Picaresque Novel

  • 8. 
    The result of an action is the reverse of what the actor expected.
    • A. 

      Understatement

    • B. 

      Situational Irony

    • C. 

      Postmodernism

    • D. 

      Oxymoron

  • 9. 
    The audience knows something that the characters in the drama do not.
    • A. 

      Adage

    • B. 

      Bildungsroman

    • C. 

      Apostrophe

    • D. 

      Dramatic Irony

  • 10. 
    The contrast is between the literal meaning of what is said and what is meant.
    • A. 

      Verbal Irony

    • B. 

      Analogy

    • C. 

      Paradox

    • D. 

      Juxtaposition

  • 11. 
    The use of angry and insulting language.
    • A. 

      Jargon

    • B. 

      Invective

    • C. 

      Malapropism

    • D. 

      Mood

  • 12. 
    Pervasive irony created by a structural feature such as a naive protagonist whose viewpoint is consistently wrong, shared by neither author nor reader is known as this.
    • A. 

      Metonymy

    • B. 

      Myth

    • C. 

      Structural Irony

    • D. 

      Satire

  • 13. 
    A figure os speech wherein a comparison is made between two unlike quantities without the use of the words "like" or "as."
    • A. 

      Metaphor

    • B. 

      Soliloquy

    • C. 

      Simile

    • D. 

      Analogy

  • 14. 
    The hero or central character of a literary work.
    • A. 

      Genre

    • B. 

      Literary Theory

    • C. 

      Motif

    • D. 

      Protagonist

  • 15. 
    A device in literature where an object represents an idea.
    • A. 

      Narrator

    • B. 

      Parody

    • C. 

      Symbolism

    • D. 

      Theme

  • 16. 
    A statement which lessens or minimizes the importance of what is meant.
    • A. 

      Verisimilitude

    • B. 

      Understatement

    • C. 

      Colloquialism

    • D. 

      Hyperbole

  • 17. 
    Wise saying; proverb; short, memorable saying that expresses a truth nd is handed down from one generation to the next.
    • A. 

      Aphorism

    • B. 

      Analogy

    • C. 

      Adage

    • D. 

      Apostrophe

  • 18. 
    A purification of emotions in literature or art.
    • A. 

      Catharsis

    • B. 

      Colloquialism

    • C. 

      Vernacular

    • D. 

      Foil

  • 19. 
    An author's choice of words.
    • A. 

      Epic

    • B. 

      Diction

    • C. 

      Syntax

    • D. 

      Genre

  • 20. 
    A word or phrase preceding or following a name which serves to describe the character in literature.
    • A. 

      Hamartia

    • B. 

      Hubris

    • C. 

      Epigraph

    • D. 

      Epithet

  • 21. 
    Unintentional use of an inappropriate word similar in sound to the appropriate word, often with humorous effect.
    • A. 

      Naturalism

    • B. 

      Modernism

    • C. 

      Malapropism

    • D. 

      Postmodernism

  • 22. 
    A revolt against the conservative values of realism.
    • A. 

      Naturalism

    • B. 

      Malapropism

    • C. 

      Modernism

    • D. 

      Postmodernism

  • 23. 
    In literature, an extreme form of realism that developed in France in the 19th Century.
    • A. 

      Naturalism

    • B. 

      Malapropism

    • C. 

      Modernism

    • D. 

      Postmodernism

  • 24. 
    A movement away from the viewpoint of modernism. 
    • A. 

      Naturalism

    • B. 

      Malapropism

    • C. 

      Modernism

    • D. 

      Postmodernism

  • 25. 
    A play on words wherein a word is used to convey two meanings at the same time.
    • A. 

      Pun

    • B. 

      Satire

    • C. 

      Hyperbole

    • D. 

      Paradox