Unit 4 Test!!!!:):):):)

70 Questions | Total Attempts: 285

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Unit 4 Test!!!!:):):):)

Take this quiz to get that A+/100% on that upcoming Biology unit test of yours! Happy Sweeties! Study up and enjoy!:):):):)


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    What is the number of chromosomes in a normal human karyotype?
    • A. 

      2

    • B. 

      23

    • C. 

      44

    • D. 

      46

  • 2. 
    Colorblindness is more common in males than in females because the allele for colorblindness is
    • A. 

      Dominant and located on the X chromosome!

    • B. 

      Dominant and located on the Y chromosome!

    • C. 

      Recessive and located on the X chromosome!

    • D. 

      Recessive and located on the Y chromosome!

  • 3. 
    The alleles for blood groups lA and lB are codominant. When paired they produce the blood type
    • A. 

      A

    • B. 

      B

    • C. 

      O

    • D. 

      AB

  • 4. 
    Which of the following diseases and conditions does not appear until later in a person's life?
    • A. 

      Cystic Fibrosis

    • B. 

      Sickle Cell Disease

    • C. 

      Colorblindness

    • D. 

      Huntington's Disease

  • 5. 
    Because two copies of a defective CF allele are needed to produce cystic fibrosis,
    • A. 

      The CF allele is dominant!

    • B. 

      The CF allele is recessive!

    • C. 

      The CF allele cannot produce CFTR!

    • D. 

      The CF allele overproduces CFTR!

  • 6. 
    Which of the following disorders does NOT result from nondisjunction in meiosis?
    • A. 

      Down syndrome

    • B. 

      Turner's syndrome

    • C. 

      Klinefelter's syndrome

    • D. 

      Sickle cell disease

  • 7. 
    The first step in sequencing the human genome is
    • A. 

      Locating overlapping sequences!

    • B. 

      Identifying genes by finding promoters!

    • C. 

      Cutting the DNA into manageable pieces!

    • D. 

      Sorting introns from exons!

  • 8. 
    What is the role of restriction enzymes in studying the human genome?
    • A. 

      Copying pieces of DNA!

    • B. 

      Labeling different nucleotides with chemical dyes!

    • C. 

      Separating different pieces of DNA based on their size!

    • D. 

      Cutting large DNA molecules into smaller pieces!

  • 9. 
    The technique known as gel electrophoresis serves to
    • A. 

      Bind DNA to chemical dyes!

    • B. 

      Separate DNA fragments!

    • C. 

      Reproduce DNA strands!

    • D. 

      Synthesize nucleotide bases!

  • 10. 
    A student traced the recurrence of a widow’s peak hairline in her family. Based on her interviews and observations, she drew the pedigree shown below. Which pattern of inheritance is consistent with the pedigree?
    • A. 

      Sex-Linked

    • B. 

      Multiple Alleles

    • C. 

      Codominant Alleles

    • D. 

      Dominant Alleles

  • 11. 
    Huntington’s disease is caused by a dominant allele for a protein found in brain cells. The symptoms of Huntington’s disease include mental deterioration and uncontrollable movements. Symptoms do not usually appear until middle age. How could a doctor determine the chances that a patient would have Huntington’s disease?
    • A. 

      By identifying if the patient’s parents carry the dominant allele for Huntington’s disease!

    • B. 

      By identifying if the patient is married to a person that exhibits symptoms of Huntington’s disease!

    • C. 

      By identifying if the patient had been in close contact with someone that exhibits symptoms of Huntington’s disease!

    • D. 

      By identifying if the patient had been in close contact with someone that carries the dominant allele for Huntington’s disease!

  • 12. 
    In 2008, the U.S. Congress passed the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act. This act makes it illegal for insurance companies and employers to discriminate based on information from genetic tests. Which of the following was most likely a concern that led to passage of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act?
    • A. 

      Insurance companies might identify where a person lives!

    • B. 

      Insurance companies might charge unreasonable rates for genetic tests!

    • C. 

      Insurance companies might try to alter a person’s DNA!

    • D. 

      Insurance companies might deny a person insurance based on his or her chances of developing a disease!

  • 13. 
    How do alleles that display codominance differ from alleles that display simple dominance?
    • A. 

      If two alleles are codominant then both alleles will be observed in heterozygotes!

    • B. 

      If two alleles are codominant then the heterozygous phenotype will be somewhere between the homozygous phenotypes!

    • C. 

      If two alleles display simple dominance then only the recessive allele will be observed in heterozygotes!

    • D. 

      If two alleles display simple dominance then neither allele will be observed in heterozygotes!

  • 14. 
    Crossing dissimilar individuals to bring together their best characteristics is called
    • A. 

      Domestication

    • B. 

      Inbreeding

    • C. 

      Hybridization

    • D. 

      Polyploidy

  • 15. 
    Crossing individuals with similar characteristics so that those characteristics will appear in their offspring is called
    • A. 

      Inbreeding

    • B. 

      Hybridization

    • C. 

      Recombination

    • D. 

      Polyploidy

  • 16. 
    Taking advantage of naturally occurring variations in organisms to pass wanted traits on to future generations is called
    • A. 

      Selective Breeding

    • B. 

      Inbreeding

    • C. 

      Hybridization

    • D. 

      Mutation

  • 17. 
    Organisms that contain genes from other organisms are called
    • A. 

      Transgenic

    • B. 

      Mutagenic

    • C. 

      Donors

    • D. 

      Clones

  • 18. 
    When cell transformation is successful, the recombinant DNA
    • A. 

      Undergoes mutation

    • B. 

      Is treated with antibiotics

    • C. 

      Becomes part of the transformed cell's genome

    • D. 

      Becomes a nucleus

  • 19. 
    Bacteria often contain small circular molecules of DNA known as
    • A. 

      Clones

    • B. 

      Chromosomes

    • C. 

      Plasmids

    • D. 

      Hybrids

  • 20. 
    A member of a population of genetically identical cells produced from a single cell is a
    • A. 

      Clone

    • B. 

      Plasmid

    • C. 

      Mutant

    • D. 

      Sequence

  • 21. 
    Which of the following characteristics is often genetically engineered into crop plants?
    • A. 

      Improved Flavor

    • B. 

      Resistance to Herbicides

    • C. 

      Shorter Ripening Times

    • D. 

      Thicker Stems

  • 22. 
    A substance that has been genetically engineered into transgenic rice has the potential to treat
    • A. 

      Cancer

    • B. 

      High Blood Pressure

    • C. 

      Vitamin A Deficiency

    • D. 

      Malaria

  • 23. 
    Which of the following techniques would scientists most likely use to understand the activity levels of hundreds of genes at once?
    • A. 

      A DNA microarray

    • B. 

      PCR

    • C. 

      Restriction Enzyme Analysis

    • D. 

      DNA Sequencing

  • 24. 
    The right to profit from a new genetic technology is protected by
    • A. 

      Getting a copyright for the method!

    • B. 

      Discovering a new gene!

    • C. 

      Obtaining a patent!

    • D. 

      Publishing its description in a journal!

  • 25. 
    DNA fingerprinting is a technology that is used for many different purposes. The diagram below is an illustration of what DNA fingerprinting data may look like! Police departments and other agencies are often tasked with investigating crimes. Which of the following describes a solution to a problem investigators face that DNA fingerprinting can help solve?
    • A. 

      DNA fingerprinting can be used to treat ­criminals that have a genetic disease or disorder!

    • B. 

      DNA fingerprinting can be used to identify ­persons that were wrongly convicted of a crime!

    • C. 

      DNA fingerprinting can be used to identify which genes are active in persons that commit crimes!

    • D. 

      DNA fingerprinting can allow persons that commit crimes to be used as animal models in medical research studies!

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