Health And Aging 1bb3

44 Questions | Total Attempts: 77

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Health And Aging 1bb3

Health and Aging 1BB3 - McMaster (FINAL EXAM QUIZ)


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Ageism is defined as:
    • A. 

      Asking older people if they need help

    • B. 

      Prejudice against older people

    • C. 

      Taking advantage of older people

    • D. 

      The dislike of elderly people

  • 2. 
    Discrimination is defined as:
    • A. 

      Unfair treatment of a person or group based on prejudice

    • B. 

      A synonym for decriminalization

    • C. 

      Making uneducated judgments

    • D. 

      Exclusion and defamation

  • 3. 
    Elderspeak is defined as:
    • A. 

      Slang unique to elders, often used in nursing homes and long-term care centres

    • B. 

      Simplified speech, similar to baby-talk, that some people use when speaking to older people

    • C. 

      The discussion of choices made concerning elderly people

    • D. 

      Speaking to elders with distaste and/or disinterest

  • 4. 
    Gerontology is defined as:
    • A. 

      The discipline that is responsible for the care of aging and elderly people

    • B. 

      The discipline central to the study of old people

    • C. 

      The discipline that systematically studies aging

    • D. 

      The discipline central to the study of ageism

  • 5. 
    Intergenerational equity is defined as:
    • A. 

      The sociological pattern in which prior generations pass on information to the current generation

    • B. 

      The obligation for current generations to care for and respect prior generations

    • C. 

      Government policies made to distinguish younger and older people

    • D. 

      The call for balanced support of older and younger people through public policy and expenditures

  • 6. 
    Prejudice is defined as:
    • A. 

      Being biased against someone or something; a negative judgement formed beforehand without knowledge of the facts

    • B. 

      Making judgements based on a lack of knowledge and acting upon these judgement in a negative manner

    • C. 

      Discrimination of specific groups of people and/or a specific person

    • D. 

      Acting impartially towards all people regardless of learned or assumed information

  • 7. 
    Social structure is defined as:
    • A. 

      Groups that congregate together due to similarities

    • B. 

      A fluctuating system of social queues and norms that adhere to the times

    • C. 

      A relatively stable pattern of social interactions

    • D. 

      Unchanging social interaction as defined by the cohort

  • 8. 
    A society for all ages is defined as:
    • A. 

      A society in which all people of all ages coexist peacefully

    • B. 

      A society that promotes the well being and contributions of older people in all aspects of life; follows the main principles of being

    • C. 

      A society that runs independently of age limitations and prejudice

    • D. 

      A society that optimizes successful aging for all older people regardless of circumstance; central to the three core beliefs of self actualization

  • 9. 
    A stereotype is defined as:
    • A. 

      Beliefs that are racist, ageist, sexist, ableist, etc. in nature

    • B. 

      Comments or judgements that are in defamatory in nature and consistent with specific personal characteristics

    • C. 

      An exaggerated and often prejudiced view of a type of person or group of people

    • D. 

      A common accepted belief that varies across cultures; may be negative

  • 10. 
    The growth of the older population of Canada has made aging _________________ that will effect us all.
    • A. 

      A major social issue

    • B. 

      A difficult and trying process

    • C. 

      An inevitable part of life

    • D. 

      An eventful and adaptive process

  • 11. 
    The two main goals of gerontology are to:
    • A. 

      Increase our knowledge of old age

    • B. 

      Study changes in the body and mind in later life

    • C. 

      Improve the quality of later life

    • D. 

      Focus new policies and expenditures on the elderly

  • 12. 
    A growing population of healthy and active older people will lead Canadians to rethink their view on aging. What is this representative of?
    • A. 

      Gerontology's aim to replace stereotypes with facts

    • B. 

      The motivation of today's elderly to be more active and satisfied

    • C. 

      The changing views in Canada today

    • D. 

      The trend relating to the increase in life expectancy in developed countries

  • 13. 
    The ever-youthful person, the active and engaged senior, and the senior accepting of aging and the physical changed it brings. What do these descriptors represent? 
    • A. 

      Common misconceptions about aging.

    • B. 

      Motivators for self-positivity in seniors.

    • C. 

      Newly emerging images of aging.

    • D. 

      Goals for seniors in later life.

  • 14. 
    Population ageing has led to new forms of ageism, in which elderly people are blamed for societies problems; most commonly known as ______________.
    • A. 

      Disruptive accusation

    • B. 

      Scapegoating

    • C. 

      Specified ageism

    • D. 

      Prejudice

  • 15. 
    Social gerontology is defined as:
    • A. 

      Using social methodology, such as interviews and personal communications, to study aging

    • B. 

      The study of aging focusing on social interactions

    • C. 

      A subfield within gerontology that focuses on the socials side of aging

    • D. 

      The a subfield of gerontology that focuses on older people as a social group

  • 16. 
    Micro-level theories:
    • A. 

      Focus on short term changes and trends

    • B. 

      Focus on a lens in which observation is close/critical

    • C. 

      Focus on smaller groups and societies

    • D. 

      Focus on individuals and their interactions

  • 17. 
    Macro-level theories:
    • A. 

      Focus on long term changes and trends

    • B. 

      Focus on examining social structures or structural elements as they influence experiences and behaviours

    • C. 

      Focus on societies and large groups and their interactions and behaviours

    • D. 

      Focus on vague or broad-lens theories that are more widely applicable than micro-level theories

  • 18. 
    Interpretive perspective is:
    • A. 

      How individuals define and create their social world

    • B. 

      How cultures interpret social information based on worldview

    • C. 

      How people respond based on the input received by others

    • D. 

      How individuals define themselves as a part of a group

  • 19. 
    Functionalist perspective focuses on
    • A. 

      Structural changes related how society functions

    • B. 

      Social order based on cooperation and consensus (interconnection)

    • C. 

      Order in an established society based on working rules

    • D. 

      Change as related to interactions and behaviour (relationships)

  • 20. 
    Conflict perspective is central to the idea that:
    • A. 

      Opposing notions and conflict maintain a system of change in society

    • B. 

      Society will always tend towards chaos and disorder

    • C. 

      Society is based on conflict between dominant and subordinate social groups

    • D. 

      Conflict urges societies to adapt and form rules to structure themselves

  • 21. 
    Positivist perspective is central to the belief that:
    • A. 

      Negativity and discrimination prevent societies from evolving positively

    • B. 

      Knowledge is built by studying observable facts and their relationship to one another

    • C. 

      Societies often change in a predictable and observable manner

    • D. 

      People form groups based on positive relationships throughout their life course

  • 22. 
    Age stratification theory focuses on:
    • A. 

      The progressives changes a person undergoes as they experience aging

    • B. 

      The movement of age cohorts over the life course and the similarities and differences between them

    • C. 

      How negative factors affect the process of aging

    • D. 

      How individual factors compare to collective factors over the life course

  • 23. 
    An age cohort is defined as:
    • A. 

      A group of people born in the same geographical area

    • B. 

      A group of people who have had similar life experiences

    • C. 

      A group of people with similar tendencies/characteristics

    • D. 

      A group of people born in the same period of time

  • 24. 
    An age grade is a concept used in age stratification theory to:
    • A. 

      Describe a period or stage of life defined by society

    • B. 

      Describe how an individual ages

    • C. 

      Define a cohort

    • D. 

      Represent a large group of people close in chronological age

  • 25. 
    Life course perspective is a functionalist approach that:
    • A. 

      Analyzes a persons life through social, structural, and cultural contexts

    • B. 

      Observes how a person changes throughout their life

    • C. 

      Compares and contrasts results of the life course

    • D. 

      Attributes aging to the accumulation of life experiences and exposure

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