Musculoskeletal Final Exam Practice Quiz

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Musculoskeletal Final Exam Practice Quiz - Quiz


Are you ready to delve into the intricate world of anatomy? Embark on a journey through the musculoskeletal system with our immersive quiz! Designed to test your understanding of bones, muscles, and joints, this quiz offers a comprehensive exploration of the body's structural features.

From identifying bones to understanding the functions of different muscle groups, our quiz covers a wide range of anatomical concepts. Whether you're a student studying anatomy or simply fascinated by the human body, this quiz provides an engaging opportunity to test your knowledge and expand your understanding of musculoskeletal anatomy.

Challenge yourself and see how well Read moreyou fare in recognizing key anatomical features and understanding their significance in the body's movement and support. Take the Musculoskeletal Features Quiz now and discover just how much you know about this essential aspect of human anatomy!


Musculoskeletal Features Questions and Answers

  • 1. 

    Which muscles insert on the 5th metatarsal?

    • A.

      Flexor Digiti Minimi Brevis, Extensor Digiti Minimi Brevis

    • B.

      Peroneus Longus, Peroneus Brevis

    • C.

      Peroneus Tertius, Peroneus Brevis

    Correct Answer
    C. Peroneus Tertius, Peroneus Brevis
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Peroneus Tertius, Peroneus Brevis. These muscles insert on the 5th metatarsal bone. The Peroneus Tertius muscle is located on the anterior aspect of the leg and inserts on the base of the 5th metatarsal. The Peroneus Brevis muscle is also located on the lateral aspect of the leg and inserts on the tuberosity of the 5th metatarsal. Both muscles play a role in foot and ankle movement, including eversion and plantar flexion.

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  • 2. 

    Which muscles do foot dorsiflexion?

    • A.

      Tibalis anterior, peroneus tertius, extensor digitorum longus, extensor hallcus longus

    • B.

      Tibalis anterior, peroneus tertius, extensor digitorum longus, flexor hallcus longus

    • C.

      Tibalis anterior, peroneus brevis, extensor digitorum longus, extensor hallcus longus

    Correct Answer
    A. Tibalis anterior, peroneus tertius, extensor digitorum longus, extensor hallcus longus
    Explanation
    The correct answer is tibalis anterior, peroneus tertius, extensor digitorum longus, extensor hallcus longus. These muscles are responsible for foot dorsiflexion, which is the movement of pulling the foot upward towards the shin. The tibalis anterior muscle is located in the front of the lower leg and is the primary muscle involved in dorsiflexion. The peroneus tertius muscle is located on the outer side of the lower leg and assists in dorsiflexion. The extensor digitorum longus muscle runs along the front of the leg and helps to extend the toes. The extensor hallcus longus muscle is also located on the front of the leg and aids in extending the big toe.

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  • 3. 

    Which muscles do plantarflexion of the foot?

    • A.

      Gastrocnemius, soleus, peroneus longus/brevis, plantaris, tibalis posterior, extensor carpi radialis longus, flexor hallcus longus

    • B.

      Gastrocnemius, soleus, flexor pollicis longus/brevis, plantaris, tibalis anterior, flexor digitorum longus, flexor hallcus longus

    • C.

      Gastrocnemius, soleus, peroneus longus/brevis, plantaris, tibalis posterior, flexor digitorum longus, flexor hallcus longus

    Correct Answer
    C. Gastrocnemius, soleus, peroneus longus/brevis, plantaris, tibalis posterior, flexor digitorum longus, flexor hallcus longus
    Explanation
    The correct answer is gastrocnemius, soleus, peroneus longus/brevis, plantaris, tibialis posterior, flexor digitorum longus, flexor hallucis longus. These muscles are responsible for plantarflexion of the foot, which is the movement of pointing the toes downward. The gastrocnemius and soleus are the two main calf muscles, while the peroneus longus/brevis, plantaris, tibialis posterior, flexor digitorum longus, and flexor hallucis longus are all located in the lower leg and foot and contribute to the movement of plantarflexion.

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  • 4. 

    What muscle is known as the hiphiker muscle?

    • A.

      Iliopsoas

    • B.

      Quadratus Lumborum

    • C.

      Gracilis

    Correct Answer
    B. Quadratus Lumborum
    Explanation
    The muscle known as the "hiphiker muscle" is the Quadratus Lumborum. This muscle is located in the lower back and plays a role in stabilizing the pelvis and helping to lift the hip. When this muscle contracts, it causes the hip to hike up or elevate, hence its nickname. The Iliopsoas and Gracilis muscles are not specifically referred to as the "hiphiker muscle."

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  • 5. 

    The sciatic nerve pierces through what muscle?

    • A.

      Piriformis

    • B.

      Pectineus

    • C.

      Peroneus Brevis

    Correct Answer
    A. Piriformis
    Explanation
    The sciatic nerve pierces through the piriformis muscle. The piriformis muscle is located deep in the buttock region, and the sciatic nerve passes through it as it travels down the leg. This muscle plays a crucial role in hip rotation and stability. If the piriformis muscle becomes tight or inflamed, it can compress the sciatic nerve, leading to sciatica symptoms such as pain, numbness, and tingling in the buttock and leg.

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  • 6. 

    Which muscle closes the eye?

    • A.

      Levator Palpebrae

    • B.

      Orbicularis Oculi

    • C.

      Superior Oblique

    Correct Answer
    B. Orbicularis Oculi
    Explanation
    The muscle that closes the eye is the Orbicularis Oculi. This muscle is responsible for closing the eyelids and protecting the eye from external stimuli such as dust or bright light. It is a circular muscle that surrounds the eye and allows for blinking and squinting. The Levator Palpebrae muscle is responsible for opening the eyelid, while the Superior Oblique muscle is involved in eye movement but not specifically in closing the eye.

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  • 7. 

    What muscles do inversion of the foot?

    • A.

      Fibularis tertius, fibularis longus, fibularis brevis

    • B.

      Tibalis posterior, flexor digitorum longus, flexor hallcus longus

    • C.

      Tibialis Anterior/Posterior, Flexor Hallicus Longus, Extensor Hallucis Longus, Flexor Digitorum Longus

    Correct Answer
    C. Tibialis Anterior/Posterior, Flexor Hallicus Longus, Extensor Hallucis Longus, Flexor Digitorum Longus
    Explanation
    The muscles involved in the inversion of the foot are the Tibialis Anterior/Posterior, Flexor Hallicus Longus, Extensor Hallucis Longus, and Flexor Digitorum Longus. These muscles work together to control the movement of the foot inwards, towards the midline of the body. The Tibialis Anterior and Posterior muscles are responsible for dorsiflexion and inversion of the foot, while the Flexor Hallicus Longus, Extensor Hallucis Longus, and Flexor Digitorum Longus muscles assist in controlling the movement of the toes and maintaining balance during inversion.

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  • 8. 

    What muscle(s) originate(s) from the anterior superior iliac spine?

    • A.

      Gluteus Maximus

    • B.

      Sartorius

    • C.

      Iliocostalis

    Correct Answer
    B. Sartorius
    Explanation
    The muscle that originates from the anterior superior iliac spine is the Sartorius muscle. The other two muscles listed, Gluteus Maximus and Iliocostalis, do not originate from this specific point.

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  • 9. 

    Semitendonosis, sartoris and gracilis make up what muscle group?

    • A.

      Pei Anserinus

    • B.

      Pes Anserinus

    • C.

      Pes Anterinus

    Correct Answer
    B. Pes Anserinus
    Explanation
    Pes Anserinus is a muscle group that is formed by the combination of semitendinosus, sartorius, and gracilis muscles. These three muscles come together at the medial aspect of the knee, forming a common tendon called the pes anserinus. This tendon attaches to the tibia bone and plays a role in flexing and rotating the knee joint.

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  • 10. 

    Which abdominal muscles do flexion?

    • A.

      External Abdominal Oblique, Internal Abdominal Oblique, Psoas Major/Minor, Quadratus Lumborum

    • B.

      External Abdominal Oblique, Internal Abdominal Oblique, Quadratus Lumborum

    • C.

      Psoas Major/Minor, Quadratus Lumborum, Diaphragm

    Correct Answer
    A. External Abdominal Oblique, Internal Abdominal Oblique, Psoas Major/Minor, Quadratus Lumborum
    Explanation
    The correct answer is External Abdominal Oblique, Internal Abdominal Oblique, Psoas Major/Minor, Quadratus Lumborum. These muscles are responsible for flexion of the abdomen. The external and internal abdominal oblique muscles help to flex and rotate the trunk, while the psoas major/minor and quadratus lumborum muscles assist in flexion and stabilization of the lumbar spine. Together, these muscles play a crucial role in movements such as bending forward or bringing the chest towards the thighs.

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  • 11. 

    What muscles flex the elbow?

    • A.

      Corocobracialis, Brachioradialis, Triceps Brachii

    • B.

      Corocobrachialis, Brachioradialis, Biceps Brachii

    • C.

      Bracialis, Brachioradialis, Biceps Brachii

    Correct Answer
    C. Bracialis, Brachioradialis, Biceps Brachii
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "Bracialis, Brachioradialis, Biceps Brachii." These three muscles work together to flex the elbow joint. The Brachialis muscle is the primary flexor of the elbow, while the Brachioradialis and Biceps Brachii muscles assist in this movement. The Brachioradialis muscle is responsible for flexing the forearm at the elbow when the forearm is in a mid-prone position, and the Biceps Brachii muscle helps to flex the elbow and supinate the forearm.

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  • 12. 

    What muscles originate or insert on the coracoid process of the scapula?

    • A.

      ORIGINATE - Brachioradialis, Biceps Brachii; INSERT: Pectoralis Minor

    • B.

      ORIGINATE - Corocobracialis, Biceps Brachii; INSERT: Pectoralis Minor

    • C.

      ORIGINATE - Corocobracialis, Tiiceps Brachii; INSERT: Pectoralis Major

    Correct Answer
    B. ORIGINATE - Corocobracialis, Biceps Brachii; INSERT: Pectoralis Minor
    Explanation
    The correct answer is ORIGINATE - Coracobrachialis, Biceps Brachii; INSERT: Pectoralis Minor. The coracobrachialis and biceps brachii muscles both originate from the coracoid process of the scapula. The pectoralis minor muscle inserts on the coracoid process of the scapula.

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  • 13. 

    What muscle is called the tailor muscle and which muscle does the opposite action of the tailor muscle?

    • A.

      Sartorius; Gracilis

    • B.

      External Abdominal Oblique; Internal Abdominal Oblique

    • C.

      Sartorius; Piriformis

    Correct Answer
    A. Sartorius; Gracilis
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Sartorius; Gracilis. The Sartorius muscle is called the tailor muscle because it is involved in the action of crossing the legs, similar to how a tailor sits cross-legged while working. The Gracilis muscle, on the other hand, performs the opposite action of the Sartorius muscle. It helps to adduct the thigh, meaning it brings the leg closer to the midline of the body, while the Sartorius muscle helps to abduct the thigh, meaning it moves the leg away from the midline of the body.

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  • 14. 

    What are the adductor muscles of the thigh?

    • A.

      Sartorius, Pectineus, Adductor Magnus/Longus/Brevis

    • B.

      Gracilis, Pectineus, Adductor Magnus/Longus/Brevis

    • C.

      Gracilis, Piriformis, Adductor Magnus/Longus/Brevis

    Correct Answer
    B. Gracilis, Pectineus, Adductor Magnus/Longus/Brevis
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Gracilis, Pectineus, Adductor Magnus/Longus/Brevis. These muscles are all adductors of the thigh, meaning they help bring the thigh towards the midline of the body. The Gracilis muscle is located on the inner thigh and is responsible for adduction as well as flexion and medial rotation of the hip. The Pectineus muscle is also located on the inner thigh and assists in adduction and flexion of the hip. The Adductor Magnus, Longus, and Brevis muscles are all located on the inner thigh and are the primary adductors of the hip joint.

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  • 15. 

    Which are the three hamstring muscles and what are their actions?

    • A.

      Biceps Femoris (medial rotation of leg), Semitendinosus (medial rotation of leg), Semimembranosus (lateral rotation of leg); **EACH HAMSTRING MUSCLE SHARES THE ACTION OF KNEE FLEXION AND EXTENSION OF THIGH**

    • B.

      Biceps Femoris (lateral rotation of leg), Semitendinosus (medial rotation of leg), Semimembranosus (medial rotation of leg); **EACH HAMSTRING MUSCLE SHARES THE ACTION OF KNEE FLEXION AND EXTENSION OF THIGH**

    • C.

      Biceps Femoris (lateral rotation of leg), Semitendinosus (lateral rotation of leg), Semimembranosus (medial rotation of leg); **EACH HAMSTRING MUSCLE SHARES THE ACTION OF KNEE FLEXION AND EXTENSION OF THIGH**

    Correct Answer
    B. Biceps Femoris (lateral rotation of leg), Semitendinosus (medial rotation of leg), Semimembranosus (medial rotation of leg); **EACH HAMSTRING MUSCLE SHARES THE ACTION OF KNEE FLEXION AND EXTENSION OF THIGH**
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Biceps Femoris (lateral rotation of leg), Semitendinosus (medial rotation of leg), Semimembranosus (medial rotation of leg); EACH HAMSTRING MUSCLE SHARES THE ACTION OF KNEE FLEXION AND EXTENSION OF THIGH. The three hamstring muscles are responsible for flexing the knee joint and extending the thigh. Additionally, the Biceps Femoris muscle also performs lateral rotation of the leg, while the Semitendinosus and Semimembranosus muscles contribute to medial rotation of the leg.

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  • 16. 

    How many vertebrae are in each section?

    • A.

      Cervical 5, Thoracic 12, Lumbar 7

    • B.

      Cervical 7, Thoracic 13, Lumbar 5

    • C.

      Cervical 7, Thoracic 12, Lumbar 5

    Correct Answer
    C. Cervical 7, Thoracic 12, Lumbar 5
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Cervical 7, Thoracic 12, Lumbar 5. This answer accurately identifies the number of vertebrae in each section of the spine. The cervical section consists of 7 vertebrae, the thoracic section consists of 12 vertebrae, and the lumbar section consists of 5 vertebrae.

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  • 17. 

    What are the muscles of mastication (mmlt) that elevate and depress the mandible?

    • A.

      Masseter (elevates), Medial Pterygoid (elevates), Lateral Pterygoid (depresses), Temporalis (elevates)

    • B.

      Masseter (elevates) Medial Pterygoid (depresses) Lateral Pterygoid (elevates), Temporalis (elevates)

    • C.

      Masseter (depresses) Medial Pterygoid (elevates), Lateral Pterygoid (depresses), Temporalis (elevates)

    Correct Answer
    A. Masseter (elevates), Medial Pterygoid (elevates), Lateral Pterygoid (depresses), Temporalis (elevates)
    Explanation
    The muscles of mastication are responsible for the movement of the mandible during chewing. The correct answer states that the Masseter and Temporalis muscles elevate the mandible, while the Medial Pterygoid muscle also elevates it. On the other hand, the Lateral Pterygoid muscle depresses the mandible. This explanation accurately describes the functions of each muscle in relation to the movement of the mandible.

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  • 18. 

    What are the different processes of the ulna?

    • A.

      Olecranon Process, Mastoid Process, CoroNOID process

    • B.

      Olecranon Process, Styloid Process, CoroCOID process

    • C.

      Olecranon Process, Styloid Process, CoroNOID process

    Correct Answer
    C. Olecranon Process, Styloid Process, CoroNOID process
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "Olecranon Process, Styloid Process, CoroNOID process." The ulna is one of the two bones in the forearm. The olecranon process is a bony projection at the top of the ulna that forms the point of the elbow. The styloid process is a bony projection at the bottom of the ulna that helps stabilize the wrist joint. The coronoid process is a bony projection on the front of the ulna that forms part of the hinge joint of the elbow.

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  • 19. 

    What are the different parts of the humerus bone?

    • A.

      Greater Tubercle, Lesser Tubercle, Head of Humerus, Surgical Neck, Anatomical Neck, Intertubercular Sulcus, Deltoid Tuberosity, Trochlea, Capitulum, Radial/Coronoid Fossa, Lateral/Medial epicondyle/supracondylar ridge

    • B.

      Greater Trochanter, Lesser Trochanter, Head of Humerus, Surgical Neck, Anatomical Neck, Intertubercular Sulcus, Deltoid Tuberosity, Trochlea, Capitulum, Radial/Corocoid Fossa, Lateral/Medial epicondyle/supracondylar ridge

    • C.

      Greater Tubercle, Lesser Tubercle, Head of Humerus, Surgical Neck, Anatomical Neck, Intertubercular Sulcus, Deltoid Tuberosity, Trochlea, Capitulum, Radial/Coronoid Fossa

    Correct Answer
    A. Greater Tubercle, Lesser Tubercle, Head of Humerus, Surgical Neck, Anatomical Neck, Intertubercular Sulcus, Deltoid Tuberosity, Trochlea, Capitulum, Radial/Coronoid Fossa, Lateral/Medial epicondyle/supracondylar ridge
    Explanation
    The correct answer includes all the different parts of the humerus bone. The greater tubercle and lesser tubercle are two bony projections on the proximal end of the humerus. The head of the humerus is the rounded part that articulates with the glenoid cavity of the scapula. The surgical neck and anatomical neck are two narrow regions of the bone. The intertubercular sulcus is a groove between the greater and lesser tubercles. The deltoid tuberosity is a roughened area where the deltoid muscle attaches. The trochlea and capitulum are two condyles that articulate with the bones of the forearm. The radial/coronoid fossa is a depression on the anterior side of the bone. Finally, the lateral/medial epicondyle and supracondylar ridge are bony projections on the distal end of the humerus.

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  • 20. 

    What is the difference between the axial and appendicular skeleton?

    • A.

      Axial includes the trunk bones (skull, spine, ribs), Appendicular includes the appendages (limb bones and their girdles)

    • B.

      Axial is posterior body, Appendicular is anterior body

    • C.

      Axial is appendages, Appendicular is the trunk

    Correct Answer
    A. Axial includes the trunk bones (skull, spine, ribs), Appendicular includes the appendages (limb bones and their girdles)
    Explanation
    The axial skeleton includes the bones of the skull, spine, and ribs, which are located in the trunk of the body. On the other hand, the appendicular skeleton consists of the bones of the limbs (arms and legs) and their girdles (shoulder and pelvic). This means that the axial skeleton is responsible for providing support and protection to the vital organs in the trunk, while the appendicular skeleton is involved in movement and locomotion.

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  • 21. 

    Chief arm extensor?

    • A.

      Pectoralis Major

    • B.

      Pectoralis Minor

    • C.

      Latissimus Dorsi

    Correct Answer
    C. Latissimus Dorsi
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Latissimus Dorsi. The latissimus dorsi is a large muscle located on the back that extends the arm at the shoulder joint. It is responsible for movements such as pulling the arm down and backward, as well as rotating the arm inward. This muscle is commonly targeted in exercises like pull-ups and rows to strengthen and develop the back muscles.

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  • 22. 

    Chief arm flexor?

    • A.

      Latissimus Dorsi

    • B.

      Deltoid

    • C.

      Pectoralis Major

    Correct Answer
    C. Pectoralis Major
    Explanation
    The pectoralis major is the correct answer because it is a large, powerful muscle located in the chest region. It is responsible for flexing the arm at the shoulder joint, as well as adducting and medially rotating the arm. The latissimus dorsi is a muscle located in the back that is responsible for extension, adduction, and medial rotation of the arm. The deltoid is a muscle located in the shoulder that is responsible for abduction of the arm.

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  • 23. 

    Chief medial arm rotator?

    • A.

      Supraspinatous

    • B.

      Infraspinatous

    • C.

      Subscapularis

    Correct Answer
    C. Subscapularis
    Explanation
    The subscapularis muscle is responsible for medially rotating the arm at the shoulder joint. It is one of the four muscles that make up the rotator cuff. The supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles are involved in the movement of the shoulder joint, but they are primarily responsible for other actions such as abduction and lateral rotation of the arm. Therefore, the subscapularis is the correct answer as the chief medial arm rotator.

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  • 24. 

    Chief arm abductor?

    • A.

      Deltoid

    • B.

      Triceps Brachii

    • C.

      Latissimus Dorsi

    Correct Answer
    A. Deltoid
    Explanation
    The deltoid is the chief arm abductor. It is a large, triangular muscle located on the shoulder and is responsible for lifting the arm away from the body. The triceps brachii is a muscle located on the back of the upper arm and is responsible for extending the arm. The latissimus dorsi is a large muscle located in the back and is responsible for adducting, extending, and internally rotating the arm.

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  • 25. 

    Chief forearm extensor?

    • A.

      Bracialis

    • B.

      Triceps Brachii

    • C.

      Biceps Brachii

    Correct Answer
    B. Triceps Brachii
    Explanation
    The triceps brachii is the chief forearm extensor. It is a three-headed muscle located at the back of the upper arm. When it contracts, it extends the forearm at the elbow joint, allowing for movements like straightening the arm or pushing objects away. The other options, brachialis and biceps brachii, are muscles that are involved in flexion of the forearm, not extension.

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  • 26. 

    Chief forearm flexor?

    • A.

      Bracialis (also Biceps Brachii)

    • B.

      Triceps Brachii (also Brachialis)

    • C.

      Biceps Brachii

    Correct Answer
    A. Bracialis (also Biceps Brachii)
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Bracialis (also Biceps Brachii). The brachialis muscle is located in the upper arm and is responsible for flexing the forearm. It lies underneath the biceps brachii muscle, which also contributes to forearm flexion. Therefore, both the brachialis and biceps brachii muscles can be considered chief forearm flexors. The triceps brachii muscle, on the other hand, is responsible for extending the forearm and is not involved in forearm flexion.

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  • 27. 

    Chief forearm pronator?

    • A.

      Quadratus Lumborum

    • B.

      Pronator Quadratus

    • C.

      Pronator Longus

    Correct Answer
    B. Pronator Quadratus
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Pronator Quadratus. The pronator quadratus is a muscle in the forearm that plays a major role in pronating the forearm, which means rotating the palm of the hand downwards. It is located deep within the forearm and is responsible for controlling the movement of the radius bone during pronation. The other options, Quadratus Lumborum and Pronator Longus, are muscles in different parts of the body and do not have a direct role in forearm pronation.

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  • 28. 

    Chief forearm supinator?

    • A.

      Supinator

    • B.

      Come on

    • C.

      Really?

    Correct Answer
    A. Supinator
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "Supinator" because it is the chief forearm supinator. The supinator muscle is responsible for rotating the forearm into a supine position, which means turning the palm of the hand upward or facing forward. It is located in the upper forearm and works in conjunction with other muscles to perform this action.

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  • 29. 

    Chief foot dorsiflexor?

    • A.

      Tibalis Posterior

    • B.

      Tibialis Anterior

    • C.

      Peroneus Brevis

    Correct Answer
    B. Tibialis Anterior
    Explanation
    The tibialis anterior is the chief foot dorsiflexor. Dorsiflexion is the movement of lifting the foot upwards towards the shin. The tibialis anterior muscle is located on the front of the lower leg and is responsible for this movement. It helps to control the lowering of the foot during walking and running, and also plays a role in maintaining balance and stability.

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  • 30. 

    Chief foot inverter?

    • A.

      Tibialis Posterior

    • B.

      Tibialis Anterior

    • C.

      Peroneus Tertius

    Correct Answer
    A. Tibialis Posterior
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Tibialis Posterior. The tibialis posterior is a muscle located in the back of the lower leg. It is responsible for inverting the foot, which means it helps to turn the foot inward. This muscle plays a crucial role in maintaining the arch of the foot and providing stability during activities such as walking, running, and jumping.

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  • 31. 

    Chief toe extender?

    • A.

      Extensor Digitorum

    • B.

      Extensor Digitorum Brevis

    • C.

      Extensor Digitorum Longus

    Correct Answer
    C. Extensor Digitorum Longus
    Explanation
    The extensor digitorum longus is a muscle located in the leg that extends the toes and dorsiflexes the foot. It is responsible for extending the second to fifth toes and is involved in movements such as walking and running. The extensor digitorum and extensor digitorum brevis are also muscles involved in toe extension, but the extensor digitorum longus is the longest and most prominent of the three. Therefore, it is the correct answer for the given question.

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  • 32. 

    Chief mover of jaw closure?

    • A.

      Hyoglossus

    • B.

      Masseter

    • C.

      Temporalis

    Correct Answer
    B. Masseter
    Explanation
    The masseter is the chief mover of jaw closure. It is a powerful muscle located on the side of the face and is responsible for elevating the mandible (lower jaw) during the process of closing the mouth. The masseter muscle is one of the strongest muscles in the human body and plays a crucial role in chewing and biting.

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  • 33. 

    Chief mover of back extension?

    • A.

      External Intercostals

    • B.

      Latissimus Dorsi

    • C.

      Erector Spinae muscles

    Correct Answer
    C. Erector Spinae muscles
    Explanation
    The erector spinae muscles are responsible for the movement of back extension. These muscles are located on either side of the spine and help to maintain proper posture, stabilize the spine, and assist in bending backward. When these muscles contract, they extend the spine, allowing for movements such as standing upright or arching the back. Therefore, the erector spinae muscles are the chief movers of back extension.

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  • 34. 

    Chief mover of inspiration?

    • A.

      Diaphragm

    • B.

      External Intercostals

    • C.

      Internal Intercostals

    Correct Answer
    A. Diaphragm
    Explanation
    The diaphragm is the chief mover of inspiration because it is the primary muscle responsible for the process of inhalation. When the diaphragm contracts, it moves downward, causing the volume of the thoracic cavity to increase and creating a negative pressure that allows air to enter the lungs. The external and internal intercostal muscles also play a role in inspiration by helping to elevate and expand the ribcage, but the diaphragm is the main muscle responsible for initiating the inhalation process.

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  • 35. 

    Chief mover to protract and hold scapula against chest wall?

    • A.

      Serratus Anterior

    • B.

      Subscapularis

    • C.

      Suprascapularis

    Correct Answer
    A. Serratus Anterior
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Serratus Anterior. The serratus anterior muscle is responsible for protracting and holding the scapula (shoulder blade) against the chest wall. This muscle is located on the side of the chest and attaches to the scapula, allowing it to move and stabilize during various arm movements. The subscapularis and suprascapularis muscles are not primarily involved in protracting and holding the scapula against the chest wall.

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  • 36. 

    Chief mover of finger extension?

    • A.

      Extensor Digitorum Brevis

    • B.

      Extensor Digitorum

    • C.

      Extensor Digitorum Longus

    Correct Answer
    B. Extensor Digitorum
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Extensor Digitorum. The Extensor Digitorum is a muscle located in the forearm that is responsible for extending the fingers. It originates from the lateral epicondyle of the humerus and inserts into the distal phalanges of the fingers. When this muscle contracts, it causes the fingers to extend or straighten. The Extensor Digitorum Brevis is a muscle in the foot, not the forearm, and the Extensor Digitorum Longus is also a muscle in the leg, not the forearm. Therefore, the Extensor Digitorum is the chief mover of finger extension.

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  • 37. 

    Chief mover of flexing thigh or flexing trunk on thigh?

    • A.

      Iliopsoas

    • B.

      Iliacus

    • C.

      Psoas Major

    Correct Answer
    A. Iliopsoas
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Iliopsoas. The iliopsoas is a group of muscles that includes the iliacus and the psoas major. Together, these muscles are responsible for flexing the thigh or flexing the trunk on the thigh. The iliacus muscle is located in the pelvic region, while the psoas major muscle runs from the lumbar spine to the thigh bone. Both muscles work together to perform these movements.

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  • 38. 

    Chief extensor of thigh?

    • A.

      Gluteus Medius

    • B.

      Gluteus Maximus

    • C.

      Gluteus Minimus

    Correct Answer
    B. Gluteus Maximus
    Explanation
    The gluteus maximus is the chief extensor of the thigh. It is the largest muscle in the gluteal region and is responsible for extending the thigh at the hip joint. It is involved in movements such as walking, running, and climbing stairs. The gluteus medius and gluteus minimus are also muscles in the gluteal region, but they have different functions and are not the primary extensors of the thigh.

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  • 39. 

    Which bones can be palpated on the lateral side of the foot?

    • A.

      Calcaneus, Talus (?), Cuboid

    • B.

      Medial (1st) cuneiform, Navicular, Talus (?), Calcaneus

    • C.

      Calcaneus, Talus (?), Cuboid, Lateral cuneiform

    Correct Answer
    A. Calcaneus, Talus (?), Cuboid
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Calcaneus, Talus, Cuboid. These bones can be palpated on the lateral side of the foot. The calcaneus is the heel bone, the talus is the bone that connects the leg to the foot, and the cuboid is a bone in the middle of the foot. Palpating these bones can help assess for any abnormalities or injuries in the foot.

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  • 40. 

    Which bones can be palpated on the medial side of the foot?

    • A.

      Medial (1st) cuneiform, Cuboid, Talus (?), Calcaneus

    • B.

      Calcaneus, Talus (?), Cuboid

    • C.

      Medial (1st) cuneiform, Navicular, Talus (?), Calcaneus

    Correct Answer
    C. Medial (1st) cuneiform, Navicular, Talus (?), Calcaneus
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Medial (1st) cuneiform, Navicular, Talus (?), Calcaneus. The medial (1st) cuneiform bone, navicular bone, talus bone, and calcaneus bone can all be palpated on the medial side of the foot.

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  • 41. 

    Muscles in the leg that pass by and go through the medial malleolus.

    • A.

      Tibalis Anterior, Tibalis Posterior, Flexor Digitorum Longus

    • B.

      Peroneus Longus , Peroneus Brevis , Peroneus Tertius , Extensor Digitorum Longus

    • C.

      Tibalis Anterior, Tibalis Posterior, Extensor Digitorum Longus

    Correct Answer
    A. Tibalis Anterior, Tibalis Posterior, Flexor Digitorum Longus
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Tibalis Anterior, Tibalis Posterior, Flexor Digitorum Longus. These muscles pass by and go through the medial malleolus, which is the bony prominence on the inner side of the ankle. The Tibalis Anterior muscle is located on the front of the leg and helps with dorsiflexion and inversion of the foot. The Tibalis Posterior muscle is located on the back of the leg and helps with plantarflexion and inversion of the foot. The Flexor Digitorum Longus muscle is also located on the back of the leg and helps with flexion of the toes.

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  • 42. 

    Muscles in the leg that pass by and go through lateral malleolus.

    • A.

      Tibalis Anterior, Tibalis Posterior, Flexor Digitorum Longus, Extensor Digitorum Longus

    • B.

      Peroneus Longus , Peroneus Brevis , Peroneus Tertius , Flexor Digitorum Longus

    • C.

      Peroneus Longus , Peroneus Brevis , Peroneus Tertius , Extensor Digitorum Longus

    Correct Answer
    C. Peroneus Longus , Peroneus Brevis , Peroneus Tertius , Extensor Digitorum Longus
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Peroneus Longus, Peroneus Brevis, Peroneus Tertius, Extensor Digitorum Longus. These muscles pass by and go through the lateral malleolus, which is the bony prominence on the outer side of the ankle. The Peroneus Longus, Peroneus Brevis, and Peroneus Tertius muscles are located on the lateral side of the leg and help with ankle eversion and plantar flexion. The Extensor Digitorum Longus muscle is located on the anterior side of the leg and helps with toe extension.

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  • 43. 

    Supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor insert on what?

    • A.

      Greater Trochanter of Humerus

    • B.

      Lesser Trochanter of Humerus

    • C.

      Head of Humerus

    Correct Answer
    A. Greater Trochanter of Humerus
    Explanation
    The supraspinatus, infraspinatus, and teres minor muscles insert on the greater tubercle of the humerus. This is the correct answer because the greater tubercle is a prominent bony projection on the lateral side of the humerus, specifically on the proximal end. These muscles, which are part of the rotator cuff, play a crucial role in the movement and stability of the shoulder joint. By inserting on the greater tubercle, they are able to exert force and control the movement of the humerus during shoulder abduction and external rotation.

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  • 44. 

    Subscapularis inserts on what?

    • A.

      Greater Trochanter of Humerus

    • B.

      Lesser Trochanter of Humerus

    • C.

      Subscapular fossa of (anterior) scapula

    Correct Answer
    B. Lesser Trochanter of Humerus
    Explanation
    The subscapularis muscle is one of the four muscles that make up the rotator cuff in the shoulder. It originates from the subscapular fossa of the scapula and inserts on the lesser tubercle of the humerus. This muscle is responsible for internal rotation of the shoulder joint and stabilization of the humeral head within the glenoid fossa. Therefore, the correct answer is "Lesser Trochanter of Humerus", as this is where the subscapularis muscle inserts.

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  • 45. 

    What is the origin and action of the supraspinatus? (sits rotator cuff muscle)

    • A.

      (O) Lateral Border of scapula, (A) Laterally rotates arm; adduction

    • B.

      (O) Supraspinous fossa of (anterior) scapula; (A) Medially rotates arm

    • C.

      (O) Supraspinous fossa of scapula, (A) Abducts arm

    Correct Answer
    C. (O) Supraspinous fossa of scapula, (A) Abducts arm
    Explanation
    The supraspinatus muscle originates from the supraspinous fossa of the scapula and its action is to abduct the arm.

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  • 46. 

    What is the origin and action of the infraspinatus? (sits rotator cuff muscle)

    • A.

      O) Infraspinous fossa of scapula, (A) Medially rotates arm

    • B.

      O) Infraspinous fossa of scapula, (A) Retracts scapula

    • C.

      O) Infraspinous fossa of scapula, (A) Laterally rotates arm

    Correct Answer
    C. O) Infraspinous fossa of scapula, (A) Laterally rotates arm
    Explanation
    The infraspinatus muscle originates from the infraspinous fossa of the scapula and its action is to laterally rotate the arm.

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  • 47. 

    What is the origin and action of the teres minor? (sits rotator cuff muscle)

    • A.

      (O) Corocoid process of scapula, (A) Laterally rotates arm; adduction

    • B.

      (O) Medial Border of scapula, (A) Medially rotates arm; abduction

    • C.

      (O) Lateral Border of scapula, (A) Laterally rotates arm; adduction

    Correct Answer
    C. (O) Lateral Border of scapula, (A) Laterally rotates arm; adduction
    Explanation
    The teres minor muscle originates from the lateral border of the scapula and its action is to laterally rotate the arm and adduct it.

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  • 48. 

    What is the origin and action of the subscapularis? (sits rotator cuff muscle)

    • A.

      O) Subscapular fossa of (anterior) scapula; (A) Medially rotates arm

    • B.

      O) Subscapular fossa of (anterior) scapula; (A) Laterally rotates arm

    • C.

      O) Subscapular fossa of (anterior) scapula; (A) Stabilizes scapula; retracts scapula

    Correct Answer
    A. O) Subscapular fossa of (anterior) scapula; (A) Medially rotates arm
    Explanation
    The correct answer is O) Subscapular fossa of (anterior) scapula; (A) Medially rotates arm. The subscapularis muscle originates from the subscapular fossa of the anterior scapula and its action is to medially rotate the arm. This muscle plays an important role in stabilizing the shoulder joint and is part of the SITS (supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor, subscapularis) rotator cuff muscles. Medial rotation of the arm is an important movement for various activities such as throwing, reaching, and lifting.

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  • 49. 

    What muscles move past multiple joints?

    • A.

      Sartorius, Rectus Femoris, Biceps Femoris, Semitendonosis, Semimembranosis, Gracilis, Gastrocnemius, Biceps Brachii, Triceps Brachii, Flexor carpi radialis longus

    • B.

      Sartorius, Rectus Femoris, Biceps Femoris, Semitendonosis, Semimembranosis, Gracilis, Gastrocnemius, Biceps Brachii, Triceps Brachii, Extensor carpi radialis longus

    • C.

      Sartorius, Rectus Femoris, Biceps Femoris, Semitendonosis, Semimembranosis, Gracilis, Gastrocnemius, Biceps Brachii, Triceps Brachii, Extensor carpi radialis brevis

    Correct Answer
    B. Sartorius, Rectus Femoris, Biceps Femoris, Semitendonosis, Semimembranosis, Gracilis, Gastrocnemius, Biceps Brachii, Triceps Brachii, Extensor carpi radialis longus
    Explanation
    The muscles listed in the answer are all capable of moving past multiple joints. These muscles include the Sartorius, Rectus Femoris, Biceps Femoris, Semitendonosis, Semimembranosis, Gracilis, Gastrocnemius, Biceps Brachii, Triceps Brachii, and Extensor carpi radialis longus. They are involved in various movements such as flexion, extension, and rotation of the joints they cross, allowing for a wide range of motion.

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  • 50. 

    What is the general action of the tibialis anterior?

    Correct Answer
    Prime Mover of Dorsiflexion; Inverts foot
    Explanation
    The tibialis anterior is responsible for two main actions: dorsiflexion and inversion of the foot. Dorsiflexion refers to the movement of pulling the foot upward towards the shin, while inversion refers to the movement of turning the sole of the foot inward. Therefore, the correct answer states that the general action of the tibialis anterior is being the prime mover of dorsiflexion and inverting the foot.

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Our quizzes are rigorously reviewed, monitored and continuously updated by our expert board to maintain accuracy, relevance, and timeliness.

  • Current Version
  • Apr 01, 2024
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team
  • Nov 11, 2010
    Quiz Created by
    Sgallagher87
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