Cognitive Skills And Abilities! Trivia Quiz

58 Questions | Total Attempts: 290

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Cognition Quizzes & Trivia

Can you answer all these questions about cognitive skills and abilities? Test your knowledge on this mental action quiz to see how you do and compare your score too.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Which is NOT true of semantic memory
    • A. 

      General world knowledge

    • B. 

      A person's mental encyclopedia and dictionary

    • C. 

      Includes language

    • D. 

      Critically depends on pituitary functioning

  • 2. 
    "ROBIN is a BIRD" is NOT an example of:
    • A. 

      A proposition

    • B. 

      Perceptual categorization

    • C. 

      An "isa" statement

    • D. 

      Category membership

  • 3. 
    "The sheer quantity of information involved... argues strongly that both the human subject's memory and our model thereof contain as little redundancy as possible and that it [should] contain stored facts only when these cannot otherwise be generated or inferred.
    • A. 

      Cognitive economy

    • B. 

      Encoding specificity

    • C. 

      Dual-coding hypothesis

    • D. 

      Characteristic feature storage

  • 4. 
    In semantic memory research, the result that typical members of a category tend to be judged as members of the category more rapidly than atypical members
    • A. 

      Typicality effect

    • B. 

      Redundancy gain

    • C. 

      Feature effect

    • D. 

      Familiarity bias

  • 5. 
    Which is NOT true?
    • A. 

      Evidence supports the notion that multiple types of categorization are used.

    • B. 

      Typical members resemble the prototype of the category.

    • C. 

      Diffusion reduces the priming effects for central categorical membership.

    • D. 

      Real-world concepts and categories involve fuzzy boundaries.

  • 6. 
    Lexical means:
    • A. 

      Network

    • B. 

      Meaning

    • C. 

      Response time

    • D. 

      Dictionary

  • 7. 
    Anomia is a
    • A. 

      Deficit in memory due to brain injury

    • B. 

      Deficit in comprehension due to brain injury

    • C. 

      Deficit in reading due to brain injury

    • D. 

      Deficit in word finding due to brain injury

  • 8. 
    "A theoretical perspective in which different abilities, characteristics, type of cognitive processes, and so forth are theorized to be represented in separate components or modules in memory"
    • A. 

      Individual differences

    • B. 

      Modularity

    • C. 

      Hemispheric speciation

    • D. 

      Comprehensive function

  • 9. 
    The proper term for better-than-baseline response (generally a result of useful advance information):
    • A. 

      Facilitation

    • B. 

      Stroop

    • C. 

      Typicality

    • D. 

      Prototyping

  • 10. 
    Which is NOT a purported advantage of using connectionist modeling to study cognition?
    • A. 

      The yes/no of neural firing mirrors the on/off binary aspect of connectionist units.

    • B. 

      Individual units within connectionist models are "similar" to neurons.

    • C. 

      Massive parallel functions allow us to extrapolate beyond what computers can model.

    • D. 

      Structural similarity to neural connections

  • 11. 
    Which is NOT one of Schacter's "seven sins of memory"?
    • A. 

      Blocking

    • B. 

      Transience

    • C. 

      Suggestibility

    • D. 

      Transfer

  • 12. 
    Schemata
    • A. 

      A stored framework or body of knowledge about some topic

    • B. 

      An active organization of past reactions or past experiences

    • C. 

      A knowledge structure in memory prospective memory

    • D. 

      All of the above

  • 13. 
    The most likely problem for the effective and fair use of eyewitness testimony in court proceedings is
    • A. 

      Semantic roles as pathway labels

    • B. 

      Recollection or recognition of exactly what was experienced

    • C. 

      Propositional encoding

    • D. 

      A "hit" despite a high proportion of "false alarms"

  • 14. 
    Large scale semantic and episodic knowledge structures that guide our interpretation and comprehension of daily experience
    • A. 

      Scripts

    • B. 

      Isolationistics

    • C. 

      Propositions

    • D. 

      Mnemonics

  • 15. 
    Which is NOT mentioned as a source of memory distortion?
    • A. 

      Source misattribution

    • B. 

      Misinformation acceptance

    • C. 

      Overconfidence in memory

    • D. 

      Encoding specificity

  • 16. 
    Refers to the ease with which something is processed or comes to mind
    • A. 

      Reconstruction

    • B. 

      Semanitc Processing

    • C. 

      Processing fluency

    • D. 

      Source effect

  • 17. 
    Attaching a title to a story can distort recall or recollection of the story.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 18. 
    In script picture stories:
    • A. 

      Atypical information is remembered better than typical information

    • B. 

      "Effects" produce fewer memory impairments than do "causes"

    • C. 

      After correcting for guessing, typical content is remembered better than atypical content

    • D. 

      People have good technical accuracy, even across a five day retention interval

  • 19. 
    Sign language is a true language
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 20. 
    Understanding productivity is argued to be the key to understanding language.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 21. 
    Languages with more phonemes allow more complex ideas to be communicated.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 22. 
    With training, grammatical versus ungrammatical sentence structures do not impact shadowing performance.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 23. 
    Any theory of speech recognition must account for both data-driven and conceptually driven processing.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 24. 
    Exposure to a syntactic structure can prime future use of that structure.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 25. 
    We begin our utterances before the syntax and semantics of the final portion of the sentence have been worked out.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 26. 
    Garden path sentences facilitate comprehension.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 27. 
    Agraphia is an inability to do mathematical computations.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 28. 
    With sufficient exposure, the ERPs to nonsense words look like ERPs to meaningful words.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 29. 
    In conversation, your beliefs about your conversational partners' knowledge and interests reflects:
    • A. 

      Derivative theory

    • B. 

      Second-order theory

    • C. 

      Direct theory

    • D. 

      Primary theory

  • 30. 
    Which is NOT part of Gernsbacher's structure building framework?
    • A. 

      Mapping information

    • B. 

      Pragmatic assessment

    • C. 

      Shifting

    • D. 

      Laying a foundation

  • 31. 
    Introduction of a new character is most associated with:
    • A. 

      Suppression

    • B. 

      Mapping

    • C. 

      Shifting

    • D. 

      Foundation building

  • 32. 
    A memory representation of a real-word situation. For example, a representation of the situation described in a passage of text
    • A. 

      Process model

    • B. 

      Semantic model

    • C. 

      Situational model

    • D. 

      Reference model

  • 33. 
    Which of the following represents "indirect reference by characterization?"
    • A. 

      Identity: Michelle bought a computer. It was on sale.

    • B. 

      Causes: They answered a question in class. The professor had called upon her.

    • C. 

      Optional roles: I taught a class yesterday. The chalk tray was empty.

    • D. 

      Probable parts: Erick bought a used snowboard. The bindings are broken.

  • 34. 
    During reading, the eye remains fixated on a word as long as the word is being actively processed. This reflects:
    • A. 

      Direct reference

    • B. 

      Eye-mind assumption

    • C. 

      Immediacy assumption

    • D. 

      The "assist" function

  • 35. 
    Which is NOT one of the four conversational maxims identified by Grice (1975)?
    • A. 

      Manner and tone

    • B. 

      Recipient awareness

    • C. 

      Quality

    • D. 

      Quantity

  • 36. 
    In conversation, your beliefs about what your conversational partner knows about you and your interests - what they think you are like - reflects:
    • A. 

      Direct theory

    • B. 

      Derivative theory

    • C. 

      Primary theory

    • D. 

      Second-Order theory

  • 37. 
    If, prior to a guest speaker coming in, your boss noted "the water glasses are empty." Which is true?
    • A. 

      The statement would be processed at the same rate if it had been made by a coworker.

    • B. 

      The statement would be processed more slowly than if made by a coworker.

    • C. 

      The statement would be processed more quickly than if made by a coworker.

    • D. 

      The statement would violate the quantity and clarity metric.

  • 38. 
    FMRI studies show greater RIGHT hemisphere activation for sentences with definite articles than indefinite articles.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 39. 
    In reasoning, the tendency to search for evidence that confirms a conclusion
    • A. 

      Confirmation bias

    • B. 

      Availability heuristic

    • C. 

      Counterfactual reasoning

    • D. 

      Insight

  • 40. 
    Consider this problem. What does it represent? Premise 1: If Mark drew it; it is a duck; Premise 2: Mark drew it. Conclusion: It is a duck.
    • A. 

      Conditional reasoning

    • B. 

      Affirm the antecedent

    • C. 

      Valid inference

    • D. 

      All of the above

  • 41. 
    Which is NOT true?
    • A. 

      "If a conclusion matches the first mental model derived from the problem, it is particularly easy (and thus likely) to accept the (potentially false) conclusion, leading to fallacies or errors in If a conclusion matches the first mental model derived from the problem, it is particularly easy (and thus likely) to accept the (potentially false) conclusion, leading to fallacies or errors in reasoning."

    • B. 

      In statistics, we test against the null hypothesis in hopes that our evidence will be inconsistent with the predicted "no effect" outcome.

    • C. 

      When hypothesis testing with increasingly complex if-then relations, the typical mistake is to search for positive, confirming evidence.

    • D. 

      The strongest logical test of a scientific theory is to see if the hypothesized effects are produced in accordance with the theoretical predictions.

  • 42. 
    "Consider this pair of judgments about which is smaller - "Which is smaller, a sheep or a bear?" and "Which is smaller, a mouse or a rat?" The faster response to the second question illustrates:"
    • A. 

      The semantic congruity effect

    • B. 

      The imagery effect

    • C. 

      The number magnitude effect

    • D. 

      The symbolic distance effect

  • 43. 
    Heuristic Algorithm
    • A. 

      The act of someone who reasons; to think logically; to analyze with reason

    • B. 

      The mental representation of meaning in a reasoning problem

    • C. 

      "A specific rule or solution procedure that is certain to yield the correct answer if followed A specific rule or solution procedure that is certain to yield the correct answer if followed correctly"

    • D. 

      An informal "rule of thumb" method for solving problems, not necessarily guaranteed to solve the problem correctly but usually much faster or more tractable than other alternatives

  • 44. 
    The belief that small samples will be representative of the population from which they are selected
    • A. 

      The "law of large numbers"

    • B. 

      The central limit theorem

    • C. 

      The fallacy "law of small numbers"

    • D. 

      This particular bias in the availability heuristic is called "sensitivity to sample size."

  • 45. 
    Kahneman & Tversky (1973) report having participants read various personality descriptions and then estimate the likelihood or probability that a person was a member of one or another profession. To a surprising degree, people's estimates are influenced by the similarity of the description to a widely held stereotype. This reflects:
    • A. 

      Availability heuristic

    • B. 

      The representativeness heuristic

    • C. 

      General world Knowledge

    • D. 

      Vividness effect

  • 46. 
    "A decision-making strategy based on the ease of retrieval from memory" The anchoring and adjustment effect most likely reflects:
    • A. 

      Retrieval effect

    • B. 

      Availability heuristic

    • C. 

      Algorithm

    • D. 

      Representativeness heuristic

  • 47. 
    "The argument that there is a central flaw in "heuristics and bias" research - that it is a mistake to assume that the correct answer to any decision-making problem must be the normative answer supplied by classic probability theory"
    • A. 

      Adaptive thinking

    • B. 

      Inductive rationalization

    • C. 

      Paradoxically called the "recognition heuristic"

    • D. 

      Counterfactual thinking

  • 48. 
    A German sample was better at (correctly) identifying that San Diego was more populous than San Antonio than a U.S. sample. This result is best described as reflecting:
    • A. 

      Mental models

    • B. 

      Naive physics

    • C. 

      Simulation heuristic

    • D. 

      Self-conceptualization of beliefs

  • 49. 
    In problem solving, an inability to think of or consider anything but the customary uses for objects and tools Wasting a lot of time opening "junk mail," even when the envelope is obviously not a "real" bill might reflect:
    • A. 

      Functional fixedness

    • B. 

      Negative set

    • C. 

      Conditional reasoning

    • D. 

      Causal analysis

  • 50. 
    A deep, useful understanding of the nature of something, especially a difficult problem A complex kind of problem solving in which relationships in one situation are mapped onto another to solve a problem
    • A. 

      Analogical reasoning

    • B. 

      Insight

    • C. 

      Clarification of the goal state

    • D. 

      Algorithmic solutions

  • 51. 
    According to Ashcraft, which of the following is NOT one of the central characteristics of problem solving? The initial, intermediate, and goal states in a problem and the problem solver's knowledge and any external resources that can be used to solve the problem
    • A. 

      Sequence of operations

    • B. 

      The problem space

    • C. 

      Goal directedness

    • D. 

      Cognitive operations

  • 52. 
    All of the following occur in problem space EXCEPT: Recursively getting closer and closer from the current state towards the solution state
    • A. 

      Conducting a constructive search

    • B. 

      Applying operators

    • C. 

      Drawing inferences

    • D. 

      Triad analysis

  • 53. 
    Working backwards entails:
    • A. 

      Establishing subgoal states that allow recycling

    • B. 

      The careful documentation of a well-specified goal or end-state

    • C. 

      Tracing the solution pathway in reverse order

    • D. 

      Establishing a representation of the full problem space

  • 54. 
    Changing the representation may involve all EXCEPT:
    • A. 

      Scratch paper

    • B. 

      Any of the above could be classified as "changing the representation."

    • C. 

      Visualization

    • D. 

      Physical representation

  • 55. 
    People are good at predicting whether they would be successful in solving routine problems.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 56. 
    Procedural knowledge is a general term referring to one's knowledge of a specific domain or topic, especially in problem solving.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 57. 
    The right hemisphere tends to be more active during insight problems than during routine problems.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 58. 
    Production memory is most related to:
    • A. 

      Semantic knowledge

    • B. 

      Declarative memory

    • C. 

      Procedural knowledge

    • D. 

      Episodic memory