Properties Of Matter Mid-term Prep Quiz 2018

15 Questions | Total Attempts: 72

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Properties Of Matter Mid-term Prep Quiz 2018 - Quiz


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    What is an atom?
    • A. 

      The smallest part of an element that is a basic unit of matter

    • B. 

      The unit measure of an element

    • C. 

      Elements that make up molecules

    • D. 

      Neutrons in the nucleus

  • 2. 
    Identify the statement that is correct about the number of protons and electrons in an atom:
    • A. 

      The number of protons and the number of electrons in an atom are always equal.

    • B. 

      The number of protons is always greater than the number of electrons in an atom.

    • C. 

      The number of protons is always less than the number of electrons in an atom.

    • D. 

      The number of protons and electrons equals the mass of an atom.

  • 3. 
    Why are Hydrogen covalent bonds non-polar?
    • A. 

      Hydrogen bonds are non-polar because electrons in the bonds between identical atoms (H-H) are shared uniformly. This means electrons spend equal amounts of time around each atomic center.

    • B. 

      Hydrogen bonds are non-polar because protons in the bonds between identical atoms (H-H) are shared uniformly. This means electrons spend equal amounts of time around each atomic center.

    • C. 

      Hydrogen bonds are non-polar because protons in the bonds between identical atoms (H-H) are not shared uniformly. This means electrons do not spend equal amounts of time around each atomic center.

    • D. 

      Hydrogen bonds are non-polar because protons and electrons in the atom of identical atoms (H-H) are shared uniformly. This means electrons do not spend equal amounts of time around each atomic center.

  • 4. 
    What makes valence electrons different from other electrons?
    • A. 

      Being in the outer shell, valance electrons can be shared or transferred (removed from or attached to) other atoms.

    • B. 

      Being in one of an atom's core shells, valance electrons are shared or transferred (removed from or attached to) within an atom.

    • C. 

      A valence electron is ionic and can be a cation or an anion.

    • D. 

      A valence electron determines the electronegativity of an atom.

  • 5. 
    What is an atom's atomic number?
    • A. 

      An atom's atomic number is the number of protons in the nucleus of an atom.

    • B. 

      An atom's atomic number is the number of the protons and neutrons of the atom.

    • C. 

      An atom's atomic number is the number of valence electrons.

    • D. 

      An atom's atomic number is the atom's electronegativity.

  • 6. 
    Choose the statement that best explains:Why do hydrogen atoms usually exist as molecules, H2?
    • A. 

      Hydrogen has an atomic number of one and is unsatisfied when the outermost orbital is unfilled. A hydrogen molecule of two hydrogen atoms is more stable than two individual hydrogen atoms

    • B. 

      Hydrogen has an atomic number of two and does not need to share

    • C. 

      Hydrogen usually combines with other atoms to form covalent bonds

    • D. 

      Hydrogen has one proton and is in search of one neutron

  • 7. 
    Choose the term that best completes the statement:The term ____________ is applied to any substance that cannot be made simpler without changing its chemical make-up.
    • A. 

      Element

    • B. 

      Atom

    • C. 

      Molecule

    • D. 

      Substance

  • 8. 
    What is matter? 
    • A. 

      Anything that has mass and occupies space.

    • B. 

      Anything that has density and occupies space.

    • C. 

      Anything that has volume and takes up space.

    • D. 

      Anything that has electrons and takes up space.

  • 9. 
    What is a chemical bond?
    • A. 

      A chemical bond is the force that holds atoms together.

    • B. 

      A chemical bond is the nucleus energy level that holds atoms together.

    • C. 

      A chemical bond is the exchange of valence electrons.

    • D. 

      A chemical bond is the pairing and sharing of electrons.

  • 10. 
    The number of _______________ determines what element it is and its chemical behavior.
    • A. 

      The number of protons determines what element it is and its chemical behavior.

    • B. 

      The number of neutrons determines what element it is and its chemical behavior.

    • C. 

      The number of protons and electrons determines what element it is and its chemical behavior.

    • D. 

      The number of electrons determines what element it is and its chemical behavior.

  • 11. 
    Identify two of the key ideas that make up the kinetic-molecular theory of matter:
    • A. 

      Matter (solids, liquids, gases) is made up of tiny particles called atoms and molecules. Matter is made up of particles that are constantly moving.

    • B. 

      Matter is made up of elements that move. Elements are not attracted to one another.

    • C. 

      Depending on the temperature a sample of matter is in determines if forms molecules. All molecules are kinetic.

    • D. 

      Solids, liquids and gases are always in motion. Solid particles have the largest amount of energy, that's what holds them together, gas particles have the least amount of energy, that's why they drift apart.

  • 12. 
    The kinetic-molecular theory explains how matter can change among the phases of solid, liquid and gas. A change in phase (solid, liquid, gas) occurs when the energy of the particles is changed. All particles have energy, the amount of energy varies depending on what factor?
    • A. 

      Temperature

    • B. 

      Location

    • C. 

      Ionic bond

    • D. 

      Covalent bond

  • 13. 
    Different states of matter. Compare the states of matter.  Identify the true statements:
    • A. 

      Solids: atoms or molecules are very attracted to one another. Solids vibrate but do not move past one another. Solids have a definite volume and definite shape.

    • B. 

      Liquids: atoms or molecules are attracted to one another. Liquids vibrate but are able to move past one another. Liquids have a definite volume but do not have a definite shape.

    • C. 

      Gases: atoms or molecules are barely attracted to one another. Gases vibrate and move more freely past one another. Gases do not have a definite volume or definite shape.

    • D. 

      All of the are true.

  • 14. 
    Heating and cooling a solid: Consider the metal ball and ring demonstration. Identify what is true about heating and cooling the metal ball and ring.  
    • A. 

      Heating the metal ball increases the motion of its atoms. The motion competes with the attraction between the atoms and makes the atoms move slightly further apart. The slightly larger metal ball will not fit through the ring. When the metal ball cools, the atoms slow down and their attractions bring the atoms closer together. This allows the metal ball to fit through the ring again.

    • B. 

      Heating the metal ball decreases the motion of its atoms. The loss of motion breaks the attraction between the atoms and makes the atoms resist each other. This resistance causes the metal ball to not fit through the ring. When the metal ball cools, the atoms attract and come closer together. This allows the metal ball to fit through the ring again.

    • C. 

      When the metal ball is heated it loses atoms and therefore causes the ball to lose attraction and not fit through the ring. When it is cooled, because it has less atoms, it is tighter and can fit through the ring.

  • 15. 
    Heating and Cooling Gases:  Consider the example of the bubble that forms on a bottle dipped in detergent solution then heated. Identify what is true about heating and cooling gases:   
    • A. 

      Heating the bottle increases the motion of gas molecules inside the bottle. Since gas molecules are not very attracted to each other, they spread out easily and quickly. The molecules will hit the inside of the bottle and the bubble film harder and more often. The molecules push against the inside of the film harder than the surrounding air pushes from the outside. This pushes the bubble film out and forms a bubble. When the bubble is still on top and you cool the bottle, the bubble will shrink and may go inside the bottle. This happens because cooling the gas slows the molecules down. The slower moving molecules hit the film less often and with less force. The molecules in the outside air are moving faster and push against the bubble from the outside. Since the outside air molecules are pushing harder, the bubble gets pushed down and smaller.

    • B. 

      Heating the bottle decreases the motion of gas molecules inside the bottle. Since gas molecules are not very attracted to each other, the heat causes them to slow down. The molecules will hit the inside of the bottle and the bubble film. The molecules push against the inside of the film around causing a reaction within the solution. This pushes the bubble film up and out and forms a bubble. When the bubble is still on top and you cool the bottle, the bubble will shrink. This happens because cooling the bottle evaporates the bubble.  

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