What Are Clauses Quiz?

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Quizzes Created: 2 | Total Attempts: 6,072
Questions: 5 | Attempts: 899

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Clause Quizzes & Trivia

Fill in the blanks below, answering the questions for each clause. Your answer will be one of the followings for each question: Subordinate Clause, Main Clause, Adjective Clause, Noun Clause, Adverb Clause.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    He danced in the wind. This is an example of what type of clause?

    Explanation
    The given sentence "He danced in the wind" is an example of a main clause. A main clause can stand alone as a complete sentence and express a complete thought. It contains a subject ("he") and a verb ("danced") and provides a complete idea. However, if the sentence was "While he danced in the wind," it would be an example of a subordinate clause. A subordinate clause cannot stand alone as a complete sentence and depends on the main clause to provide a complete thought.

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  • 2. 

    If the weather is bad This is an example of what type of clause?

    Explanation
    This question is asking to identify the type of clause that the given sentence "If the weather is bad" belongs to. The sentence "If the weather is bad" is an example of a subordinate clause because it begins with the subordinating conjunction "if" and cannot stand alone as a complete sentence. It depends on the main clause to make sense and provide a complete thought.

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  • 3. 

    That a politician can be crooked never occurred to me. This is an example of what type of subordinate clause?

    Explanation
    This sentence contains multiple subordinate clauses that function as different types of clauses. The phrase "that a politician can be crooked" is a noun clause because it acts as the subject of the main clause. It introduces the idea that a politician can be dishonest. Additionally, it can also be considered an adverb clause because it modifies the verb "occurred" by providing information about the speaker's thoughts. Lastly, it can be seen as an adjective clause because it describes the noun "politician" by specifying that they can be dishonest.

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  • 4. 

    As we approached the intersection, we saw the Nelson's car. This is an example of what type of subordinate clause?

    Explanation
    The given sentence "As we approached the intersection, we saw the Nelson's car" contains multiple subordinate clauses. "As we approached the intersection" functions as an adverb clause because it modifies the main verb "saw" by providing information about the time or manner of the action. "The Nelson's car" is a noun clause because it functions as the direct object of the verb "saw." It is a clause because it includes a subject ("the Nelson's car") and a verb ("saw"). Lastly, there is no adjective clause in the given sentence.

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  • 5. 

    I like a leader who listens to men. This is an example of what type of subordinate clause?

    Explanation
    This sentence contains three different types of subordinate clauses. "Who listens to men" is an adjective clause because it modifies the noun "leader" and describes the type of leader the speaker likes. "I like a leader" is a noun clause because it functions as the object of the verb "like". Lastly, "I like a leader" can also be considered an adverb clause because it modifies the verb "like" and provides information about the speaker's liking.

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  • Current Version
  • Mar 21, 2023
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team
  • Apr 18, 2011
    Quiz Created by
    Johnsmiths
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