Independent And Subordinate Clauses Quiz

Reviewed by Heather Baxter
Heather Baxter, BSc |
K-12 English Expert
Review Board Member
Heather is an educator, with four years of teaching experience. Heather graduated from the University of South Florida with a Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education and Teaching. She is skilled in Teaching English as a Second Language and currently works as an Elementary School Teacher at Pinellas County Schools. She made a career transition one year ago to explore a new path in writing and copy editing. Heather's specialization lies in curriculum development and educational materials, but she maintains versatility to work across various industries. Known for her keen attention to detail and a deep passion for language, she possesses a sharp eye for precision.
, BSc
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Independent And Subordinate Clauses Quiz - Quiz


Do you want to assess your grasp of independent and subordinate clauses? It's time to put your knowledge to the test! Clauses are the building blocks of sentences, and understanding how to use independent and subordinate clauses is essential for effective communication.
An independent clause can stand alone as a complete sentence, conveying a clear thought. On the other hand, a subordinate clause cannot function independently; it lacks completeness and must be attached to an independent clause to make sense.
This quiz challenges you to identify whether the bolded words in sentences are independent or subordinate clauses. It's Read morean opportunity to enhance your understanding of these fundamental sentence components.
Whether you're a language enthusiast looking to fine-tune your skills or a learner eager to navigate the intricacies of clauses, this quiz is for you. Dive into the fascinating world of clauses and sharpen your grammatical prowess. Take the quiz now and elevate your linguistic competence!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    Jason took a nap before he left for his friend's house.

    • A.

      Independent

    • B.

      Subordinate

    • C.

      I'm not sure

    Correct Answer
    A. Independent
    Explanation
    The given sentence "Jason took a nap before he left for his friend's house" is an independent clause because it can stand alone as a complete sentence and expresses a complete thought. It has a subject (Jason) and a predicate (took a nap before he left for his friend's house) and does not rely on any other clause to make sense.

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  • 2. 

    You can keep your privileges as long as we continue to see progress.

    • A.

      Independent

    • B.

      Subordinate

    • C.

      I'm not sure

    Correct Answer
    B. Subordinate
    Explanation
    The sentence "You can keep your privileges as long as we continue to see progress" contains a subordinate clause. The main clause is "You can keep your privileges," and it is dependent on the subordinate clause "as long as we continue to see progress" to provide the condition or circumstance under which the privileges can be kept.

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  • 3. 

    Although you may disagree, I still say Sheila is the best person for the job.

    • A.

      Independent

    • B.

      Subordinate

    • C.

      I'm not sure

    Correct Answer
    B. Subordinate
    Explanation
    The sentence "Although you may disagree, I still say Sheila is the best person for the job" is a subordinate clause. It introduces a contrast or condition (the disagreement of others) and is dependent on the main clause for its complete meaning. The main clause is not provided in this sentence, so it is clear that it relies on another clause to express a complete thought.

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  • 4. 

    There would be less tension between them if they could just see eye to eye.

    • A.

      Independent

    • B.

      Subordinate

    • C.

      I'm not sure

    Correct Answer
    A. Independent
    Explanation
    The sentence "There would be less tension between them if they could just see eye to eye" is an independent clause. It can stand alone as a complete sentence and expresses a complete thought. It conveys a condition (seeing eye to eye) and the result (less tension) and does not depend on another clause to make sense.

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  • 5. 

    I'm bringing my homework along even though we don't plan to stay long.

    • A.

      Independent

    • B.

      Subordinate

    • C.

      I'm not sure

    Correct Answer
    A. Independent
    Explanation
    The statement "I'm bringing my homework along” is an independent clause. It can stand alone as a complete sentence because it expresses a complete thought with a subject and a predicate. The next part of the sentence provides additional information about the action of bringing the homework and is considered a subordinate clause.

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  • 6. 

    In order to be respectful of the presenters, please turn off your cell phones.

    • A.

      Independent

    • B.

      Subordinate

    • C.

      I'm not sure

    Correct Answer
    B. Subordinate
    Explanation
    The clause “”In order to be respectful of the presenters” is dependent on the main clause and cannot stand alone as a complete sentence. Therefore, the word "subordinate" is the correct answer as it describes a dependent clause.

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  • 7. 

    I knew this was going to be an exciting game when Andrew took his first swing.

    • A.

      Independent

    • B.

      Subordinate

    • C.

      I'm not sure

    Correct Answer
    B. Subordinate
    Explanation
    The given sentence, "I knew this was going to be an exciting game when Andrew took his first swing," contains a dependent clause ("when Andrew took his first swing") that cannot stand alone as a complete sentence. This clause is dependent on the main clause ("I knew this was going to be an exciting game") to make sense. Therefore, the correct answer is "Subordinate," indicating that the clause is a subordinate or dependent clause.

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  • 8. 

    Before you go, would you please be sure to clean up the mess you made?

    • A.

      Independent

    • B.

      Subordinate

    • C.

      I'm not sure

    Correct Answer
    B. Subordinate
    Explanation
     The clause “Before you go” requires additional information to be a complete thought. Therefore, the correct answer is "Subordinate," which means that the statement is a subordinate clause that cannot stand alone as a complete sentence.

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  • 9. 

    It seemed like only yesterday that I was here playing tag with my friends Julie and Laurie

    • A.

      Independent

    • B.

      Subordinate

    • C.

      I'm not sure

    Correct Answer
    B. Subordinate
    Explanation
    The phrase "It seemed like only yesterday” dependent clause because it cannot stand alone as a complete sentence. The clause is dependent on the rest of the sentence to provide a subject and a predicate, so therefore the clause is subordinate.

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  • 10. 

    Since she was only just around the corner, Paula decided to walk to the store instead of driving.

    • A.

      Independent

    • B.

      Subordinate

    • C.

      I'm not sure

    Correct Answer
    A. Independent
    Explanation
    The clause "Paula decided to walk to the store instead of driving" can stand alone as a complete sentence, expressing a complete thought. It does not depend on any other clause to make sense. Therefore, it is an independent clause.

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Heather Baxter |BSc |
K-12 English Expert
Heather is an educator, with four years of teaching experience. Heather graduated from the University of South Florida with a Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education and Teaching. She is skilled in Teaching English as a Second Language and currently works as an Elementary School Teacher at Pinellas County Schools. She made a career transition one year ago to explore a new path in writing and copy editing. Heather's specialization lies in curriculum development and educational materials, but she maintains versatility to work across various industries. Known for her keen attention to detail and a deep passion for language, she possesses a sharp eye for precision.

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  • Current Version
  • Jun 03, 2024
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team

    Expert Reviewed by
    Heather Baxter
  • Feb 26, 2013
    Quiz Created by
    JacobStudent
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