Chapter 21 Philosophy Test

23 Questions | Total Attempts: 392

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Chapter 21 Philosophy test


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Care ethics:
    • A. 

      A global concept referring to the unique combination of needs, desires, emotions, feelings, moods which together make who an individuals uniqueness.

    • B. 

      The point of view of giving value priority to particular relationships in which one is both caring and cared .

    • C. 

      A description of how a person should and does decide or choose according to some clearly articulated rule or principles.

  • 2. 
    Character:
    • A. 

      Refers to Immanuel Kant's ethical theory, that the categorical imperative is part of the test for the moral worth of an action

    • B. 

      Often translated as happiness, but it is not a synonym for joy, as is so often the case with happiness in ordinary language.

    • C. 

      A global concept referring to the unique combination of needs, desires, emotions, feelings, moods which together make who an individuals uniqueness.

  • 3. 
    Eudaimonia:
    • A. 

      A global concept referring to the unique combination of needs, desires, emotions, feelings, moods which together make who an individuals uniqueness.

    • B. 

      The point of view of giving value priority to particular relationships in which one is both caring and cared .

    • C. 

      Often translated as happiness, but it is not a synonym for joy, as is so often the case with happiness in ordinary language.

  • 4. 
    Kantianism:
    • A. 

      Refers to Immanuel Kant's ethical theory, that the categorical imperative is part of the test for the moral worth of an action

    • B. 

      An average. That which falls in the middle. For Aristotle, virtuous action always fell withing the mean or middle between to extremes.

    • C. 

      Often translated as happiness, but it is not a synonym for joy, as is so often the case with happiness in ordinary language.

  • 5. 
    The Mean (golden mean):
    • A. 

      An average. That which falls in the middle. For Aristotle, virtuous action always fell withing the mean or middle between to extremes.

    • B. 

      The point of view of giving value priority to particular relationships in which one is both caring and cared .

    • C. 

      Practical wisdom which, for Aristotle, comes after a number of virtues have been mastered

  • 6. 
    Phronesis:
    • A. 

      Goodness or minimize the consequences of non-moral badness.The ethical theroy which claims that actions are to be evaluated by how well they maximize the overall consequences of non-moral

    • B. 

      Practical wisdom which, for Aristotle, comes after a number of virtues have been mastered

    • C. 

      For the ancient Greeks, virtue and excellence were the same work. For Aristotle, virtue was found in the mean between too much and too little

  • 7. 
    Utilitarianism:
    • A. 

      Practical wisdom which, for Aristotle, comes after a number of virtues have been mastered

    • B. 

      The point of view of giving value priority to particular relationships in which one is both caring and cared .

    • C. 

      The ethical theory which claims that actions are to be evaluated by how well they maximize the overall consequence of non- moral goodness or minimize the consequences of non-moral badness.The ethical theroy which claims that actions are to be evaluated by how well they maximize the overall consequences of non-moral

  • 8. 
    Virtue:
    • A. 

      For the ancient Greeks, virtue and excellence were the same work. For Aristotle, virtue was found in the mean between too much and too little

    • B. 

      Practical wisdom which, for Aristotle, comes after a number of virtues have been mastered

    • C. 

      The point of view of giving value priority to particular relationships in which one is both caring and cared .

  • 9. 
    Virtue ethics tends to focus on:
    • A. 

      Actions

    • B. 

      Institutions

    • C. 

      Charater

  • 10. 
    In ancient Greek, virtue was synonymous with:
    • A. 

      Duty

    • B. 

      Excellence

    • C. 

      Obligation

  • 11. 
    A core concept to the ancient Greek ethical theory was:
    • A. 

      Eudaimonia

    • B. 

      Euphoria

    • C. 

      Euthanasia

  • 12. 
    In ancient Greece, if you mastered a number of virtues, then you were said to possess:
    • A. 

      Power

    • B. 

      Knowledge

    • C. 

      Phronesis

  • 13. 
    Virtue ethics, as opposed to utilitarianism or Kantiansim, does not attempt to provide a:
    • A. 

      Formulas or decision procedure for evaluating all actions

    • B. 

      Any consideration of what a person should do

    • C. 

      Any method for attaining happiness

  • 14. 
    The modern ethical theories of utilitarianism and Kantianism attempt to provide primarily a:
    • A. 

      Formula or decision procedure for evaluating all actions

    • B. 

      Some consideration for the person's character

    • C. 

      A method for individuals to attain happiness

  • 15. 
    According to Aristotle, virtue is to be found in the:
    • A. 

      Commands of the gods

    • B. 

      Mean between deficiency and excess

    • C. 

      The greatest good for the greatest number

  • 16. 
    Generosity has been described as that virtue which falls between:
    • A. 

      Spitefulness and beneficence

    • B. 

      Impulsiveness and inexorableness

    • C. 

      Stinginess and profligacy.

  • 17. 
    A strength of virtue ethics over ethical theories such as Kantianism is:
    • A. 

      The inclusion of the emotions and personal history

    • B. 

      The emphasis upon the significance of intention

    • C. 

      The conceptual distinction between actions and behaviors

  • 18. 
    Weakness of virtue ethics may be found in the fact that:
    • A. 

      It emphasized having an overall good life

    • B. 

      Conflicts between virtues or sets of virtues held by different people or communities cannot be resolved by appealing to a virtue.

    • C. 

      It's an old, even ancient, theory for dealing with life.

  • 19. 
    Contemporary philosopher Alasdair McIntyre argues that modern ethics has forgotten moral virtue
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 20. 
    Aristotle rejects the idea that a virtue is the ability to be reasonable in our actions, desires, and emotions.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 21. 
    According to Aristotle, virtue is never easy and pleasant
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 22. 
    Carol Gilligan argues that men and women approach ethics in exactly the same way
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 23. 
    For philosopher Nel Noddings, the "feminine" virtue of caring is more fundamental than the "masculine" focus on principles
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False