Chapter 1: Research Methods In Psychology (Grivas)

25 Questions | Total Attempts: 365

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Research Method Quizzes & Trivia

There are various ways in which one can use to collect data when it comes to psychology. The most common method is through descriptive research methods where one gets to observe the sample of the population they are targeting and the event linking them. Take up the quiz below based on chapter one where we covered Research Methods In Psychology (grivas) in preparation for the unit 3 final exam and see how high you score.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    A random sample of VCE students in a school could be achieved by selecting
    • A. 

      Students whose VCE candidate number ends with an even number.

    • B. 

      Students who walk to school.

    • C. 

      Every tenth student walking out of a VCE assembly.

    • D. 

      All students who are enrolled in three or more science studies.

  • 2. 
    Operationalising the variables for an experimental research hypothesis would involve 
    • A. 

      Ensuring the variables operate in a strictly controlled experiment.

    • B. 

      Deciding on the importance of all the experimental variables.

    • C. 

      Describing the independent and dependent variables in terms of how they will be observed, manipulated and measured.

    • D. 

      Providing detailed descriptions of all independent and dependent variables.

  • 3. 
    In an experiment, strict control of extraneous and potential confounding variables
    • A. 

      Can be achieved only in a laboratory setting.

    • B. 

      Enables the researcher to deal with all ethical considerations.

    • C. 

      Can be achieved only if random sampling is used.

    • D. 

      Eliminates any explanation of the results obtained being due to a variable other than the independent variable.

  • 4. 
    An interview usually involves _____, whereas a questionnaire usually involves _____.
    • A. 

      Written responses to written questions presented by the researcher; oral responses to orally presented questions

    • B. 

      Quantitative data; qualitative data

    • C. 

      Qualitative data; quantitative data

    • D. 

      Oral responses to orally presented questions; written responses to written questions presented by the researcher

  • 5. 
    In an experiment
    • A. 

      The dependent variable is manipulated.

    • B. 

      The independent variable is always introduced into the control condition.

    • C. 

      The dependent variable is held constant.

    • D. 

      The independent variable is manipulated.

  • 6. 
    A statistically significant difference in the mean scores of groups in an experiment suggests that
    • A. 

      The role of chance is at an acceptable level.

    • B. 

      The results should be rejected by the researcher.

    • C. 

      Chance has played no role.

    • D. 

      The level of probability is high.

  • 7. 
    Random allocation and random sampling
    • A. 

      Are avoided by researchers as they are haphazard procedures.

    • B. 

      Differ in that random allocation is used to place participants in groups and random sampling is used to select participants for a study.

    • C. 

      Differ in that random sampling is used to place participants in groups and random allocation is used to select participants for a study.

    • D. 

      Are both used to select participants for an experiment.

  • 8. 
    In an experiment, the group that receives the treatment is called the _____ group, whereas the group that does not is called the _____ group.
    • A. 

      Independent; dependent

    • B. 

      Control; experimental

    • C. 

      Dependent; independent

    • D. 

      Experimental; control

  • 9. 
    Which of the following p values is the strictest?
    • A. 

      P ≤ 0.001

    • B. 

      P ≤ 0.01

    • C. 

      P ≤ 0.10

    • D. 

      P ≤ 0.05

  • 10. 
    The matched-participants experimental design involves
    • A. 

      Allocation of each member of a pair of participants, very similar in a characteristic likely to influence the dependent variable, to different groups (or conditions).

    • B. 

      The allocation of each member of a pair of participants, very similar in a characteristic likely to influence the dependent variable, to the same group (or conditions).

    • C. 

      Random selection of participants, then random allocation to different experimental conditions.

    • D. 

      Random selection of participants, then random allocation to different experimental conditions, ensuring there is counterbalancing.

  • 11. 
    A researcher plans their experiment so that all variables other than the IV that may impact on the DV are spread equally across all experimental conditions. This procedure is best described as
    • A. 

      An order effect.

    • B. 

      A matched-participants design.

    • C. 

      Double-blind.

    • D. 

      Counterbalancing.

  • 12. 
    A researcher gives vitamin C to one group of research participants and a placebo to another group to measure the effect of vitamin C on the common cold. The frequency of colds is
    • A. 

      The independent variable.

    • B. 

      The dependent variable.

    • C. 

      An extraneous variable.

    • D. 

      A confounding variable.

  • 13. 
    An experiment was conducted to assess the effectiveness of a new technique for learning Greek words. One group used the learning technique and another group did not. Both groups were then given the same test of recall of Greek words. The results showed that the group using the learning technique recalled more Greek words than did the group who did not use the learning technique. In this experiment, _____ is the independent variable, whereas _____ is the dependent variable.
    • A. 

      Number of Greek words correctly recalled; using the learning technique

    • B. 

      Using the learning technique; number of Greek words correctly recalled

    • C. 

      Number of Greek words learned; number of Greek words correctly recalled

    • D. 

      Number of Greek words correctly recalled; number of Greek words learned

  • 14. 
    A researcher selects participants by randomly sampling different groups from a target population. The researcher believes that the sex and religious beliefs of participants will be influential on the results, so the researcher ensures these characteristics are proportionally represented in the sample. This type of sampling procedure is best described as
    • A. 

      Biased sampling

    • B. 

      Stratified-random sampling.

    • C. 

      Random sampling.

    • D. 

      Stratified sampling.

  • 15. 
    A statistical test was carried out on the results obtained for the experiment described in question 13. The statistical test showed that the difference in scores between the two groups was significant (p < 0.05). The result for this statistical test indicates that
    • A. 

      The difference between the number of words correctly recalled is due to chance.

    • B. 

      There is a 95% chance that the learning technique works.

    • C. 

      A difference equal to, or greater than, the difference found in this experiment is likely to occur by chance less than 5% of times the experiment is replicated.

    • D. 

      There is a 95% chance that the learning technique does not work.

  • 16. 
    Ethical guidelines in psychological research are intended to ensure that
    • A. 

      Participants are responsible for the research.

    • B. 

      Participants can make comments on the results whenever they want to.

    • C. 

      The rights and wellbeing of the researcher are not compromised in any way.

    • D. 

      The rights and wellbeing of participants are not compromised in any way.

  • 17. 
    A researcher intentionally arranged the order in which the conditions of a repeated-measures experiment were experienced. This was done to control order effects that were expected to occur. This procedure is most commonly referred to as
    • A. 

      Biased participant selection.

    • B. 

      Counterbalancing.

    • C. 

      Unethical.

    • D. 

      Biased participant allocation.

  • 18. 
    A generalisation of the results obtained from research involves
    • A. 

      Determining the statistical significance of the results.

    • B. 

      Establishing a cause–effect relationship between the independent and dependent variables.

    • C. 

      Applying the findings obtained from a sample to the population.

    • D. 

      Drawing a conclusion about whether the results support or do not support the hypothesis.

  • 19. 
    Which of the following researcher behaviours would be considered unethical?
    • A. 

      Informing participants about the results of the experiment

    • B. 

      Preventing a participant from leaving an experiment midway through the experiment

    • C. 

      Checking up on the age of a participant when there is doubt that the participant may not be old enough to give informed consent

    • D. 

      Publishing the results of the experiment without obtaining informed consent from the participants

  • 20. 
    Which of the following is an example of a self-report?
    • A. 

      Diary records kept by a person with a spider phobia on how they think and feel whenever they see a spider

    • B. 

      The researcher’s raw data collected for their study

    • C. 

      The researcher’s formal report on their study

    • D. 

      The findings reported by an ethics committee on the suitability of a researcher’s experience and qualifications to undertake a proposed study

  • 21. 
    The least number of participants that can be used in an experiment with a repeated-measures design is
    • A. 

      One.

    • B. 

      Impossible to determine.

    • C. 

      Dependent on the possibility of an order effect.

    • D. 

      Dependent on the availability of participants.

  • 22. 
    In a repeated-measures experimental design, each participant is exposed to
    • A. 

      All conditions of the experiment.

    • B. 

      The independent variable only.

    • C. 

      The independent variable repeatedly.

    • D. 

      The dependent variable repeatedly.

  • 23. 
    Before conducting an experiment, a researcher identified all potential extraneous variables expected to affect the dependent variable, then refined the design of the experiment to minimise or eliminate the influence of such variables. The researcher did this to help ensure that
    • A. 

      A single-blind procedure could be used before interpreting the results.

    • B. 

      A double-blind procedure could be used before interpreting the results.

    • C. 

      Inferential statistics could be used to help interpret the results.

    • D. 

      There would be no confounding variables.

  • 24. 
    The best technique for ensuring control over demand characteristics and experimenter effects is the use of
    • A. 

      Inferential statistics before the experiment is conducted.

    • B. 

      The double-blind procedure.

    • C. 

      Inferential statistics after the experiment is conducted.

    • D. 

      The single-blind procedure.

  • 25. 
    In a simple experiment, participants will be either exposed to the independent variable or not exposed to the independent variable. What type of experimental design will be used?
    • A. 

      Single-blind

    • B. 

      Matched-participants

    • C. 

      Independent-groups

    • D. 

      Repeated-measures

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