Ch15 Aquatic Therapy In Rehabilitation

17 Questions | Total Attempts: 687

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Ch15 Aquatic Therapy In Rehabilitation

Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    The _____ counteracts the force of gravity as it assists motion toward the water's surface and resists motion away from the surface.
    • A. 

      Buoyant force

    • B. 

      Specific gravity

    • C. 

      Cohesive force

    • D. 

      Bow force

    • E. 

      Drag force

  • 2. 
    Because of differences in the _____ of the body, the head and chest tend to float higher in the water than the heavier, denser extremities, making compensation with floatation devices necessary.
    • A. 

      Buoyant force

    • B. 

      Specific gravity

    • C. 

      Cohesive force

    • D. 

      Bow force

    • E. 

      Drag force

  • 3. 
    There is a sloght but easily overcome ____ that runs in a parallel direction to the water surface.
    • A. 

      Buoyant force

    • B. 

      Specific gravity

    • C. 

      Cohesive force

    • D. 

      Bow force

    • E. 

      Drag force

  • 4. 
    A second force is the _____, or the force that is generated at the front of the object during movement.  
    • A. 

      Buoyant force

    • B. 

      Specific gravity

    • C. 

      Cohesive force

    • D. 

      Bow force

    • E. 

      Drag force

  • 5. 
    This third force, the fluid ____, is very important in aquatic therapy.  _____ on an object can be controlled by changing the shape of the object or the speed of its movement.
    • A. 

      Buoyant force

    • B. 

      Specific gravity

    • C. 

      Cohesive force

    • D. 

      Bow force

    • E. 

      Drag force

  • 6. 
    Assist in edema control, decrease pain, increse mobility as edema decreases
    • A. 

      Swelling/peripheral edema

    • B. 

      Decreased ROM

    • C. 

      Decreased strength

    • D. 

      Weightbearing restrictions

    • E. 

      Cardiovascular deconditioning or potential deconditioning due to inability to train

    • F. 

      Gait deviations

    • G. 

      Difficulty or pain with land interventions

    • H. 

      Decreased balance, proprioception, coordination

  • 7. 
    Earlier initiation of rehabilitation, controlled active movements
    • A. 

      Swelling/peripheral edema

    • B. 

      Decreased ROM

    • C. 

      Decreased strength

    • D. 

      Weightbearing restrictions

    • E. 

      Cardiovascular deconditioning or potential deconditioning due to inability to train

    • F. 

      Gait deviations

    • G. 

      Difficulty or pain with land interventions

    • H. 

      Decreased balance, proprioception, coordination

  • 8. 
    Strength progression from assisted to resisted to functional; gradual increase in exercise intensity
    • A. 

      Swelling/peripheral edema

    • B. 

      Decreased ROM

    • C. 

      Decreased strength

    • D. 

      Weightbearing restrictions

    • E. 

      Cardiovascular deconditioning or potential deconditioning due to inability to train

    • F. 

      Gait deviations

    • G. 

      Difficulty or pain with land interventions

    • H. 

      Decreased balance, proprioception, coordination

  • 9. 
    Can partially or completely unweight the lower extremities; regulate weight bearing progressions
    • A. 

      Swelling/peripheral edema

    • B. 

      Decreased ROM

    • C. 

      Decreased strength

    • D. 

      Weightbearing restrictions

    • E. 

      Cardiovascular deconditioning or potential deconditioning due to inability to train

    • F. 

      Gait deviations

    • G. 

      Difficulty or pain with land interventions

    • H. 

      Decreased balance, proprioception, coordination

  • 10. 
    Earlier return to function in supported, forgiving environment, slower movements
    • A. 

      Swelling/peripheral edema

    • B. 

      Decreased ROM

    • C. 

      Decreased strength

    • D. 

      Weightbearing restrictions

    • E. 

      Cardiovascular deconditioning or potential deconditioning due to inability to train

    • F. 

      Gait deviations

    • G. 

      Difficulty or pain with land interventions

    • H. 

      Decreased balance, proprioception, coordination

  • 11. 
    Gradual increase of exercise intensity, alternative training environment for lower weight bearing
    • A. 

      Swelling/peripheral edema

    • B. 

      Decreased ROM

    • C. 

      Decreased strength

    • D. 

      Weightbearing restrictions

    • E. 

      Cardiovascular deconditioning or potential deconditioning due to inability to train

    • F. 

      Gait deviations

    • G. 

      Difficulty or pain with land interventions

    • H. 

      Decreased balance, proprioception, coordination

  • 12. 
    Slower movements, easier assessment, and modification of gait
    • A. 

      Swelling/peripheral edema

    • B. 

      Decreased ROM

    • C. 

      Decreased strength

    • D. 

      Weightbearing restrictions

    • E. 

      Cardiovascular deconditioning or potential deconditioning due to inability to train

    • F. 

      Gait deviations

    • G. 

      Difficulty or pain with land interventions

    • H. 

      Decreased balance, proprioception, coordination

  • 13. 
    Increased support, decreased weight bearing, assistance due to buoyancy, more relaxed environment 
    • A. 

      Swelling/peripheral edema

    • B. 

      Decreased ROM

    • C. 

      Decreased strength

    • D. 

      Weightbearing restrictions

    • E. 

      Cardiovascular deconditioning or potential deconditioning due to inability to train

    • F. 

      Gait deviations

    • G. 

      Difficulty or pain with land interventions

    • H. 

      Decreased balance, proprioception, coordination

  • 14. 
    Select Contraindications and Precautions
    • A. 

      Swelling/peripheral edema

    • B. 

      Decreased ROM

    • C. 

      Decreased strength

    • D. 

      Weightbearing restrictions

    • E. 

      Cardiovascular deconditioning or potential deconditioning due to inability to train

    • F. 

      Gait deviations

    • G. 

      Difficulty or pain with land interventions

    • H. 

      Decreased balance, proprioception, coordination

    • I. 

      Untreated infectious disease(patient has a fever/temperature)

    • J. 

      Open wounds or unhealed surgical incisions

    • K. 

      Contagious skin diseases

    • L. 

      Serious cardiac conditions

    • M. 

      Seizure disorders(uncontrolled)

    • N. 

      Excessive fear of water

    • O. 

      Allergy to pool chemicals

    • P. 

      Vital capacity of 1 liter

    • Q. 

      Uncontrolled high or low blood pressure

    • R. 

      Uncontrolled bowel or bladder incontinence

    • S. 

      Menstruation without internal protection

  • 15. 
    As a method, if focuses on muscle reducation, strengthening, spinal traction/elongation, relaxation, and tone inhibition.  The properties of water----including buoyancy, turbulence, hydrostatic pressure, and surface tension----provide dynamic environmental forces during activities.
    • A. 

      Bad Ragaz Ring Method

    • B. 

      Burdenko Method

    • C. 

      Halliwick Method

  • 16. 
    The components of dynamic healing include patterns of movements, injury assessment, and rehabilitation exercises that occur with the patient in a standing position
    • A. 

      Bad Ragaz Ring Method

    • B. 

      Burdenko Method

    • C. 

      Halliwick Method

  • 17. 
    This method is frequenctly utilized with the pediatric population but portions of the technique can be utilized to improve and restore a patient's balance.
    • A. 

      Bad Ragaz Ring Method

    • B. 

      Burdenko Method

    • C. 

      Halliwick Method

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