Assh: Reconstructive Options For Peripheral Nerve Injuries

3 Questions | Total Attempts: 73

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Assh: Reconstructive Options For Peripheral Nerve Injuries

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Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    A 43 year old gentleman sustains a through and through gunshot injury to his left distal forearm. Surprisingly, there is no bony or vascular injury but he has weakness in thumb opposition and numbness over the thumb, index, long and radial border of his ring finger. You suspect a complete median nerve injury. His ability to partially oppose the thumb may be due to functioning of:
    • A. 

      A. APB

    • B. 

      B. ADM

    • C. 

      C. FPB

    • D. 

      D. Opponens pollicis

  • 2. 
    A 65 year old gentleman presents with gradual loss of functioning of his right hand, especially with fine motor skills such as buttoning his shirt. He has wasting of his intrinsic muscles, difficulty adducting his digits and numbness of his small finger. He has minimal clawing. Given these findings, you suspect injury to his ulnar nerve at the:
    • A. 

      A. Distal ulnar tunnel

    • B. 

      B. Distal forearm

    • C. 

      C. Mid forearm

    • D. 

      D. Distal arm

  • 3. 
    You are called to see an 18 year old gentleman in the ER after he has been stabbed in posterior aspect of the arm. He has an obvious wrist drop. Suspecting an injury to the radial nerve, you decide to take the patient to the operating room where you find a transected radial nerve that is primarily repaired without tension. In discussing the prognosis for recovery with him, the factor that is most closely linked to his recovery is:
    • A. 

      A. Mechanism of injury flaps, tissue expansion, free flap

    • B. 

      B. Time to repair

    • C. 

      C. His age

    • D. 

      D. Level of injury

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