ACE Inhibitors & Arbs (Angiotension II Receptor Blockers)

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ACE Inhibitors & Arbs (Angiotension II Receptor Blockers) - Quiz

Ace and ARB inhibitors are drugs taken by someone with high blood pressure and diabetes. How conversant are you with the drugs, how to prescribe them and the side effects your patient can expect? Take up this easy quiz below to share your score in the comment section. All the best as you tackle it.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    Which of the following side effects is common with ACE inhibitors and ARBs?

    • A.

      Persistent, dry cough

    • B.

      Nasal congestion

    • C.

      Increased fluid in lungs

    • D.

      Drowsiness

    Correct Answer
    A. Persistent, dry cough
    Explanation
    ACE Inhibitors/ARBs often cause a persistent, dry cough. They are often used for heart failure patients - so they would actually DECREASE pulmonary congestion - and they have no effects on nasal congestion or sedative effects.

    LeMone, P., Burke, K., & Bauldoff, G. (2011). Medical-Surgical Nursing: Critical Thinking in Patient Care, 5th ed., San Francisco: Pearson. p.980-981.

    Rate this question:

  • 2. 

    Which of the following lab values may result when taking an ACE inhibitor/ARB?

    • A.

      Decreased chloride level

    • B.

      Increased magnesium level

    • C.

      Decreased WBC count

    • D.

      Decreased potassium level

    Correct Answer
    C. Decreased WBC count
    Explanation
    ACE Inhibitors/ARBs can cause low white blood cell count, increased potassium level, but have little to no effect on chloride or magnesium.

    LeMone, P., Burke, K., & Bauldoff, G. (2011). Medical-Surgical Nursing: Critical Thinking in Patient Care, 5th ed., San Francisco: Pearson. p.980-981.

    Rate this question:

  • 3. 

    Which lab value should you play close attention to when a patient is on an ACE inhibitor/ARB?

    • A.

      Potassium; ACE inhibitors/ARBs can cause hypokalemia

    • B.

      BUN; ACE inhibitors/ARBs can cause renal failure

    • C.

      Sodium; ACE inhibitors/ARBs can cause hyponatremia

    • D.

      Potassium; ACE inhibitors/ARBs can cause hyperkalemia

    Correct Answer
    D. Potassium; ACE inhibitors/ARBs can cause hyperkalemia
    Explanation
    ACE inhibitors/ARBs often result in hyperkalemia. They have no effect on sodium, and may cause a transient increase in BUN/Creatinine - but do not cause renal failure.

    LeMone, P., Burke, K., & Bauldoff, G. (2011). Medical-Surgical Nursing: Critical Thinking in Patient Care, 5th ed., San Francisco: Pearson. p.980-981.

    Rate this question:

  • 4. 

    True or False: ACE inhibitors and ARBs reduce the workload of the heart. 

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    ACE inhibitors are often prescribed to reduce the workload of the heart.

    LeMone, P., Burke, K., & Bauldoff, G. (2011). Medical-Surgical Nursing: Critical Thinking in Patient Care, 5th ed., San Francisco: Pearson. p.980-981.

    Rate this question:

  • 5. 

    Which of the following medications should not be taken with an ACE inhibitor or ARB?

    • A.

      Protonix

    • B.

      Aldactone

    • C.

      Furosemide

    • D.

      Aspirin

    Correct Answer
    B. Aldactone
    Explanation
    Because ACE inhibitors/ARBs can cause hyperkalemia, potassium-sparing diuretics may make this even worse. Furosemide is not a potassium-sparing diuretic. Protonix has no association with ACE inhibitors/ARBs. Many patients who need ACE inhibitors/ARBs are already on baby aspirin.

    LeMone, P., Burke, K., & Bauldoff, G. (2011). Medical-Surgical Nursing: Critical Thinking in Patient Care, 5th ed., San Francisco: Pearson. p.980-981.

    Rate this question:

  • 6. 

    All ACE inhibitors end with the suffix:

    • A.

      Ace

    • B.

      Ing

    • C.

      Pril

    • D.

      Lol

    Correct Answer
    C. Pril
    Explanation
    The ACE inhibitors are the "prils"!

    LeMone, P., Burke, K., & Bauldoff, G. (2011). Medical-Surgical Nursing: Critical Thinking in Patient Care, 5th ed., San Francisco: Pearson. p.980-981.

    Rate this question:

  • 7. 

    Which of the following drugs is an ACE inhibitor?

    • A.

      Losartan

    • B.

      Metoprolol

    • C.

      Lanoxin

    • D.

      Captopril

    Correct Answer
    D. Captopril
    Explanation
    ACE inhibitors are the "prils"!

    LeMone, P., Burke, K., & Bauldoff, G. (2011). Medical-Surgical Nursing: Critical Thinking in Patient Care, 5th ed., San Francisco: Pearson. p.980-981.

    Rate this question:

  • 8. 

    ACE inhibitors/ARBs are most commonly prescribed for patients with:

    • A.

      Angina

    • B.

      Arrhythmia

    • C.

      Hypotension

    • D.

      Heart failure

    Correct Answer
    D. Heart failure
    Explanation
    Patients with heart failure are likely to be put on an ACE inhibitor/ARB. ACE inhibitors/ARBs can CAUSE hypotension. They have no effect on cardiac arrhythmias, and do not directly affect angina.

    LeMone, P., Burke, K., & Bauldoff, G. (2011). Medical-Surgical Nursing: Critical Thinking in Patient Care, 5th ed., San Francisco: Pearson. p.980-981.

    Rate this question:

  • 9. 

    The nurse should teach the patient on ACE inhibitors/ARBs to:

    • A.

      Take the medication at alternating times of the day

    • B.

      Rise slowly from a sitting to standing position

    • C.

      Monitor their weight monthly

    • D.

      Avoid leafy green vegetables

    Correct Answer
    B. Rise slowly from a sitting to standing position
    Explanation
    ACE inhibitors/ARBs can cause orthostatic hypotension - so patients will need to rise slowly from a sitting position, to avoid falls. ACE inhibitors/ARBs should be taken at the same time of the day everyday - weight should be monitored weekly or biweekly, and leafy green vegetables are contraindicated for meds like Coumadin, since they contain Vitamin K.

    LeMone, P., Burke, K., & Bauldoff, G. (2011). Medical-Surgical Nursing: Critical Thinking in Patient Care, 5th ed., San Francisco: Pearson. p.980-981.

    Rate this question:

  • 10. 

    Which of the following is the most important assessment after administering a newly prescribed ACE inhibitor/ARB?

    • A.

      Temperature

    • B.

      Respiratory rate

    • C.

      Cardiac rhythm

    • D.

      Blood pressure

    Correct Answer
    D. Blood pressure
    Explanation
    ACE inhibitors/ARBs can cause hypotension. They will not affect respiratory rate or cardiac rhythm. They can reduce white blood cell count, putting the patient at higher risk of infections - but this would not be as immediately important as the blood pressure.

    LeMone, P., Burke, K., & Bauldoff, G. (2011). Medical-Surgical Nursing: Critical Thinking in Patient Care, 5th ed., San Francisco: Pearson. p.980-981.

    Rate this question:

  • 11. 

    ACE inhibitors and ARBs:

    • A.

      Reduce afterload

    • B.

      Increase preload

    • C.

      Decrease renal blood flow

    • D.

      Increase afterload

    Correct Answer
    A. Reduce afterload
    Explanation
    ACE inhibitors/ARBs reduce afterload. Afterload is the pressure the heart has to push AGAINST when it pumps blood out to the body - afterload is higher in high blood pressure, atherosclerosis (clogged blood vessels), and vasoconstriction. Afterload is lower in low blood pressure and vasodilation. Preload is the VOLUME, coming from the body, that enters the heart. Preload is high in fluid volume overload, and low in fluid volume deficit. Most cardiac meds work by either: lowering preload (diuretics) or lowering afterload (vasodilators). ACE inhibitors/ARBs also increase renal blood flow - they shunt more fluid to the kidneys, which reduces the amount of volume going to the heart from the body (reduced preload). Cardiac meds will NEVER increase preload or afterload! That wouldn't be good for the heart!

    LeMone, P., Burke, K., & Bauldoff, G. (2011). Medical-Surgical Nursing: Critical Thinking in Patient Care, 5th ed., San Francisco: Pearson. p.980-981.

    Rate this question:

  • 12. 

    True or False: ACE Inhibitors/ARBs are given to improve cardiac output. 

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    True! Decreased cardiac output is NEVER a good thing.

    LeMone, P., Burke, K., & Bauldoff, G. (2011). Medical-Surgical Nursing: Critical Thinking in Patient Care, 5th ed., San Francisco: Pearson. p.980-981.

    Rate this question:

  • 13. 

    All ARBs (Angiotensin II receptor Blockers) end with this suffix:

    • A.

      Tan

    • B.

      Pril

    • C.

      Lol

    • D.

      Ace

    Correct Answer
    A. Tan
    Explanation
    ARBs are the "tans"!

    LeMone, P., Burke, K., & Bauldoff, G. (2011). Medical-Surgical Nursing: Critical Thinking in Patient Care, 5th ed., San Francisco: Pearson. p.980-981.

    Rate this question:

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  • Current Version
  • Apr 16, 2024
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team
  • Feb 22, 2013
    Quiz Created by
    Mamatomaddy

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