How Much Do You Know About Terrestrial Period?

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How Much Do You Know About Terrestrial Period? - Quiz

Are you someone who has a keen interest in astronomy? How much do you know about the terrestrial period? Take this terrestrial period quiz, and see what your understanding of this topic is. This quiz is going to be a practice test as well as informative in terms of learning. Go for it and check out what you score. All the best for a perfect score here! You can also share the quiz with others with the same area of interest as yours.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    What formula is used for calculating the Terrestrial Period?

    • A.

      TT = TAI* + 3 seconds

    • B.

      TT = TAI* + 52 seconds

    • C.

      TT = TAI* + 32.184 seconds

    • D.

      TT = TAI* + 16.45 seconds

    Correct Answer
    C. TT = TAI* + 32.184 seconds
    Explanation
    The formula used for calculating the Terrestrial Period is TT = TAI* + 32.184 seconds. This formula adds 32.184 seconds to the International Atomic Time (TAI) to determine the Terrestrial Time (TT).

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  • 2. 

    What is Terrestrial Time used for?

    • A.

       Distance measurements of astronomical observations made from the surface of the Earth.

    • B.

       Time measurements of astronomical observations made from the surface of the Earth.

    • C.

       Time measurements of astronomical objects when sent from the surface of the Earth.

    • D.

      All of the above

    Correct Answer
    B.  Time measurements of astronomical observations made from the surface of the Earth.
    Explanation
    Terrestrial Time (TT) is used for time measurements of astronomical observations made from the surface of the Earth. This time scale is based on the rotation of the Earth and is used to accurately measure and record the timing of various celestial events observed from our planet. TT is essential in synchronizing and comparing observations made by different observatories and is widely used in astronomy and astrophysics research.

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  • 3. 

    The Astronomical Almanac uses TT for its ephemerides of 

    • A.

      Sun

    • B.

      Moon

    • C.

      Planets

    • D.

      All of the above

    Correct Answer
    D. All of the above
    Explanation
    The Astronomical Almanac uses TT (Terrestrial Time) for its ephemerides of the Sun, Moon, and Planets. Terrestrial Time is a modern time standard that is based on the rotation of the Earth and is used in astronomy to provide accurate and consistent measurements of celestial objects. By using TT, the Astronomical Almanac ensures that its ephemerides are reliable and can be used for various astronomical calculations and predictions.

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  • 4. 

    What is the original purpose of Ephemeris Time?

    • A.

      To be free of irregularities in the Earth's rotation.  

    • B.

      To be free of the Earth's rotation

    • C.

      Both a & b

    • D.

      None of the above

    Correct Answer
    A. To be free of irregularities in the Earth's rotation.  
    Explanation
    Ephemeris Time was originally designed to be free of irregularities in the Earth's rotation. This means that it was created to provide a more accurate and consistent measure of time that is not affected by variations in the Earth's rotation. By being free of these irregularities, Ephemeris Time can serve as a reliable reference for astronomical calculations and observations.

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  • 5. 

    What does the unit of TT, the SI second, is based on?

    • A.

      Cesium molecular clock

    • B.

      Cesium atomic clock

    • C.

      Cesium atomic number

    • D.

      Cesium molecular number

    Correct Answer
    B. Cesium atomic clock
    Explanation
    The unit of TT, the SI second, is based on the cesium atomic clock. This clock measures time based on the vibrations of cesium atoms, which have a very stable and consistent frequency. The cesium atomic clock is considered the most accurate timekeeping device and is used as the primary standard for defining the second in the International System of Units (SI).

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  • 6. 

    What is TAI?

    • A.

      International Time Atomic

    • B.

      International Atomic Time

    • C.

      Atomic Time International

    • D.

      Time Atomic International

    Correct Answer
    B. International Atomic Time
    Explanation
    TAI stands for International Atomic Time, which is a high-precision time standard based on the vibrations of atoms. It is used to measure time intervals with extreme accuracy and is maintained by several atomic clocks located around the world. TAI is not affected by factors such as the Earth's rotation, making it a reliable and consistent timekeeping system.

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  • 7. 

    Who introduced Ephemeris Time (ET)?

    • A.

      TDT

    • B.

      IUA

    • C.

      TDD

    • D.

      IAU

    Correct Answer
    D. IAU
    Explanation
    The International Astronomical Union (IAU) introduced Ephemeris Time (ET).

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  • 8. 

    In TDT, where is the observer?

    • A.

      On another planet

    • B.

      On moon

    • C.

      On earth

    • D.

      On mars

    Correct Answer
    C. On earth
    Explanation
    The observer in TDT is located on earth. TDT stands for Terrestrial Dynamical Time, which is a timekeeping system based on the rotation of the earth. Therefore, the observer must be on earth to measure and track time accurately according to TDT.

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  • 9. 

    TD used in the theories of motion for bodies ___________.

    • A.

      On earth

    • B.

      In the solar system

    • C.

      On planets

    • D.

      None of the above

    Correct Answer
    A. On earth
    Explanation
    The answer "on earth" is correct because TD (time-dependent) is used in the theories of motion specifically for bodies on earth. It refers to the fact that the motion of objects on earth is influenced by various factors such as gravity, air resistance, and friction, which can change over time. Therefore, TD is an important concept in understanding and predicting the motion of objects on earth.

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  • 10. 

    The International Bureau of Weights and Measures distributes the tables that can be used to obtain TT from TAI.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    The International Bureau of Weights and Measures provides tables that can be used to calculate Terrestrial Time (TT) from International Atomic Time (TAI). This implies that the statement is true. The International Bureau of Weights and Measures is responsible for maintaining and distributing standards related to measurements, including timekeeping. TAI is a precise time scale based on atomic clocks, while TT is a time scale used in astronomy. The tables provided by the Bureau allow for the conversion between these two time scales.

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