Run-ons, Comma Splices, And Fragments Quiz!

Reviewed by Heather Baxter
Heather Baxter, BSc |
K-12 English Expert
Review Board Member
Heather is an educator, with four years of teaching experience. Heather graduated from the University of South Florida with a Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education and Teaching. She is skilled in Teaching English as a Second Language and currently works as an Elementary School Teacher at Pinellas County Schools. She made a career transition one year ago to explore a new path in writing and copy editing. Heather's specialization lies in curriculum development and educational materials, but she maintains versatility to work across various industries. Known for her keen attention to detail and a deep passion for language, she possesses a sharp eye for precision.
, BSc
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| By Msbaulch
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Quizzes Created: 2 | Total Attempts: 72,941
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Run-ons, Comma Splices, And Fragments Quiz! - Quiz


Consider yourself an English expert? Ready to tackle some of the trickier aspects of English grammar? Our Run-Ons, Comma Splices, and Fragments Quiz is here to challenge your understanding of these common writing pitfalls.
Run-ons, comma splices, and fragments are frequent stumbling blocks for writers, often causing confusion in sentences and disrupting the flow of written communication. This quiz will put your knowledge of these grammar issues to the test.
In this quiz, you'll encounter questions that delve into the nuances of run-on sentences, comma splices, and sentence fragments. It's an opportunity to demonstrate your ability to identify Read moreand correct these grammatical errors, ultimately enhancing your writing skills.
Whether you're an avid grammar enthusiast or someone looking to sharpen their writing, this quiz provides an engaging way to evaluate your expertise.
Are you ready to face the challenge? Dive into the quiz, tackle the questions, and see how well you can navigate the intricacies of run-ons, comma splices, and fragments in English grammar. Best of luck, and feel free to share this quiz with friends to see how well they understand these grammatical concepts!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    Which sentence below is correct?

    • A.

      Our town has four restaurants only one open at 7:00 am.

    • B.

      Our town has four restaurants! only one is open at 7:00 am.

    • C.

      Our town has four restaurants; only one, is open at 7:00 am.

    • D.

      Our town has four restaurants, and only one is open at 7:00 am.

    • E.

      Only one is open at 7:00 am, our town has four restaurants.

    Correct Answer
    D. Our town has four restaurants, and only one is open at 7:00 am.
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "Our town has four restaurants, and only one is open at 7:00 am." This sentence effectively conveys the information that there are four restaurants in the town, and out of those four, only one is open at 7:00 am. The use of the coordinating conjunction "and" appropriately connects the two ideas in the sentence.

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  • 2. 

    Which sentence below is correct?

    • A.

      Look through the window and you can see the mountain peaks in the distance.

    • B.

      If you look through the window, you can see the mountain peaks in the distance.

    • C.

      Look through the window, you can see the mountain peaks in the distance.

    • D.

      You can see the mountain peaks in the distance, look through the window.

    Correct Answer
    B. If you look through the window, you can see the mountain peaks in the distance.
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "If you look through the window, you can see the mountain peaks in the distance." This sentence follows the correct structure of a conditional sentence, with the "if" clause at the beginning and the main clause following it. The use of the comma after "window" indicates a pause in the sentence, making it grammatically correct.

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  • 3. 

    Which sentence below is correct?

    • A.

      Larry is never interested in going for a run in the winter, however in the summer he'll take a brief jog.

    • B.

      Larry is never interested in going for a run in the winter, however, in the summer he'll take a brief jog.

    • C.

      Larry is never interested in going for a run in the winter however, in the summer he'll take a brief jog.

    • D.

      Larry is never interested in going for a run in the winter; however in the summer he'll take a brief jog.

    • E.

      Larry is never interested in going for a run in the winter; however, in the summer, he'll take a brief jog.

    Correct Answer
    E. Larry is never interested in going for a run in the winter; however, in the summer, he'll take a brief jog.
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "Larry is never interested in going for a run in the winter; however, in the summer he'll take a brief jog." This sentence is correct because it uses a semicolon to separate the two independent clauses, "Larry is never interested in going for a run in the winter" and "however, in the summer he'll take a brief jog." The use of a semicolon is appropriate here because the two clauses are closely related and the second clause provides additional information or contrast to the first clause. Additionally, the sentence uses commas correctly to set off the word "however" as an interrupter.

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  • 4. 

    Which sentence below is correct?

    • A.

      We've done all that we can here to pack up the supplies.

    • B.

      We've done all that we can here, pack up the supplies.

    • C.

      Pack up the supplies, we've done all that we can here.

    • D.

      We've done all that we can here; pack up the supplies.

    Correct Answer
    D. We've done all that we can here; pack up the supplies.
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "We've done all that we can here; pack up the supplies." This sentence is correct because it uses a semicolon to separate two independent clauses. The first clause "We've done all that we can here" stands alone as a complete sentence, and the second clause "pack up the supplies" also stands alone as a complete sentence. The semicolon is used to show a stronger connection between the two clauses compared to using a period or comma.

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  • 5. 

    Which one is NOT a sentence fragment?

    • A.

      Although it was a more difficult test than the students had ever taken.

    • B.

      We decided to study before we went out to the party.

    • C.

      Her ability to remember details, after all, not what she used to be.

    Correct Answer
    B. We decided to study before we went out to the party.
    Explanation
    The given sentence "We decided to study before we went out to the party" is not a sentence fragment because it contains a subject (We) and a predicate (decided to study before we went out to the party), forming a complete thought.

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  • 6. 

    Which one is NOT a sentence fragment?

    • A.

      Sand piling up along the beach.

    • B.

      She wanted to use a shovel to dig a hole in the ground.

    • C.

      However, who wanted to be the winner of the contest.

    Correct Answer
    B. She wanted to use a shovel to dig a hole in the ground.
    Explanation
    The given answer, "She wanted to use a shovel to dig a hole in the ground," is not a sentence fragment because it contains both a subject (she) and a predicate (wanted to use a shovel to dig a hole in the ground). It forms a complete thought and can stand alone as a sentence. In contrast, the other options are sentence fragments because they lack either a subject or a predicate, or they do not form a complete thought.

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  • 7. 

    Which one is NOT a sentence fragment?

    • A.

      Bobby receiving more than sixty boxes of donations this year.

    • B.

      Leaving for Florida soon.

    • C.

      Since Susan hasn't seen the dentist, her teeth are rotten.

    Correct Answer
    C. Since Susan hasn't seen the dentist, her teeth are rotten.
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "Since Susan hasn't seen the dentist, her teeth are rotten." This is not a sentence fragment because it contains both a subject (Susan) and a predicate (hasn't seen the dentist, her teeth are rotten). It forms a complete thought and can stand alone as a sentence. The other options, "Bobby receiving more than sixty boxes of donations this year" and "Leaving for Florida soon," are sentence fragments because they lack a subject or a predicate.

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  • 8. 

    Select the answer that correctly completes each group of words to form a sentence or sentences. The best way to get to Columbus, Ohio is to take the highway __________ is no point in taking an airplane these days.    

    • A.

      , there;

    • B.

      , there

    • C.

      . There

    • D.

      There

    Correct Answer
    C. . There
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "there". The sentence is suggesting that taking the highway is the best way to get to Columbus, Ohio because there is no point in taking an airplane these days. The word "there" is used to indicate the reason or explanation for why taking the highway is the best option.

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  • 9. 

    Select the answer that correctly completes each group of words to form a sentence or sentences. Having a car allows you to get places quickly _______________ don't have to ask your parents for a ride.

    • A.

      So you,

    • B.

      So you;

    • C.

      , so you,

    • D.

      , so you

    Correct Answer
    D. , so you
    Explanation
    The correct answer is ", so you." This completes the sentence by indicating that having a car allows you to get places quickly, so you don't have to ask your parents for a ride.

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  • 10. 

    Select the answer that correctly completes each group of words to form a sentence or sentences. Normally, I wouldn't spend time with elves and fairies ___________ are so fascinating.

    • A.

      But; they

    • B.

      But. They

    • C.

      , but they

    • D.

      But they,

    Correct Answer
    C. , but they
    Explanation
    The correct answer is ", but they". This answer completes the sentence by indicating that the speaker wouldn't normally spend time with elves and fairies, but they find them fascinating. The comma before "but" helps to separate the contrasting ideas in the sentence.

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  • 11. 

    What does the following sentence need? Planning on getting married for over a year.

    • A.

      The sentence is correct.

    • B.

      The group of words is a dependent clause and can't stand alone as a sentence.

    • C.

      The group of words is a phrase and is missing a subject; it cannot stand alone as a sentence.

    • D.

      The group of words is a run-on or comma splice and needs a conjunction or semicolon.

    Correct Answer
    C. The group of words is a phrase and is missing a subject; it cannot stand alone as a sentence.
    Explanation
    The given sentence "Planning on getting married for over a year" is a phrase and is missing a subject. It cannot stand alone as a sentence because it does not have a subject and a predicate. 

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  • 12. 

    What does the following sentence need?Laughing that hard made my stomach hurt, I had to sit down.

    • A.

      The sentence is correct.

    • B.

      The group of words is a dependent clause and can't stand alone as a sentence.

    • C.

      The group of words is a phrase and is missing a verb; it cannot stand alone as a sentence.

    • D.

      The group of words is a run-on or comma splice and needs conjunction.

    Correct Answer
    D. The group of words is a run-on or comma splice and needs conjunction.
    Explanation
    The given sentence "Laughing that hard made my stomach hurt, I had to sit down." is a run-on or comma splice because it contains two independent clauses ("Laughing that hard made my stomach hurt" and "I had to sit down") that are joined together with just a comma. To correct this, a conjunction like "so" or "therefore" should be used to connect the two clauses.

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  • 13. 

    What does the following sentence need?Until I receive confirmation that you have enrolled in classes this semester.

    • A.

      The sentence is correct.

    • B.

      The group of words is a dependent clause and can't stand alone as a sentence.

    • C.

      The group of words is a phrase and is missing a verb; it cannot stand alone as a sentence.

    • D.

      The group of words is a run-on or comma splice and needs conjunction.

    Correct Answer
    B. The group of words is a dependent clause and can't stand alone as a sentence.
    Explanation
    The given sentence "Until I receive confirmation that you have enrolled in classes this semester" is a dependent clause because it starts with the subordinating conjunction "until" and cannot stand alone as a sentence. It is dependent on another clause to form a complete sentence.

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  • 14. 

    What does the following sentence need? Pauline yelled at the boy teetering on the bridge he fell in.

    • A.

      The sentence is correct.

    • B.

      The group of words is a dependent clause and can't stand alone as a sentence.

    • C.

      The group of words is a phrase and is missing a verb; it cannot stand alone as a sentence.

    • D.

      The group of words is a run-on or comma splice and needs a conjunction.

    Correct Answer
    D. The group of words is a run-on or comma splice and needs a conjunction.
    Explanation
    The given sentence "Pauline yelled at the boy teetering on the bridge he fell in" is a run-on or comma splice because it combines two independent clauses without proper punctuation or a conjunction. The phrase "he fell in" is a separate clause and needs to be connected to the main clause with a conjunction like "and" or "but" to create a grammatically correct sentence.

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  • 15. 

    What does the following sentence need? Bobby is pleased with the purchase he made earlier in the day.

    • A.

      The sentence is correct.

    • B.

      The group of words is a dependent clause and can't stand alone as a sentence.

    • C.

      The group of words is a phrase and is missing a verb; it cannot stand alone as a sentence.

    • D.

      The group of words is a run-on or comma splice and needs a conjunction.

    Correct Answer
    A. The sentence is correct.
    Explanation
    The given sentence "Bobby is pleased with the purchase he made earlier in the day" is grammatically correct and does not require any changes or additions. It is a complete sentence with a subject (Bobby) and a predicate (is pleased with the purchase he made earlier in the day). Therefore, the answer "The sentence is correct" is appropriate.

    Rate this question:

Heather Baxter |BSc |
K-12 English Expert
Heather is an educator, with four years of teaching experience. Heather graduated from the University of South Florida with a Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education and Teaching. She is skilled in Teaching English as a Second Language and currently works as an Elementary School Teacher at Pinellas County Schools. She made a career transition one year ago to explore a new path in writing and copy editing. Heather's specialization lies in curriculum development and educational materials, but she maintains versatility to work across various industries. Known for her keen attention to detail and a deep passion for language, she possesses a sharp eye for precision.

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Our quizzes are rigorously reviewed, monitored and continuously updated by our expert board to maintain accuracy, relevance, and timeliness.

  • Current Version
  • May 15, 2024
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team

    Expert Reviewed by
    Heather Baxter
  • Nov 13, 2008
    Quiz Created by
    Msbaulch
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