Run-on Sentences & Comma-splices

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Run On Sentence Quizzes & Trivia

Are you familiar with comma splice or fused sentences? Do you think you can pass this quiz? Both writing errors are sentence boundary errors that occur when independent clauses are joined incorrectly. A comma splice arises when a comma is used to separate two independent clauses, while a fused sentence ensues when two independent clauses are joined without any punctuation. If you want to learn more, try this quiz.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    What is a run-on sentence?

    • A.

      A sentence that has legs and is escaping the page.

    • B.

      A sentence that contains two or more clauses but lacks proper punctuation to break it up.

    • C.

      A sentence that has too many punctuation marks.

    • D.

      A sentence that can only be fixed by adding a comma.

    Correct Answer
    B. A sentence that contains two or more clauses but lacks proper punctuation to break it up.
    Explanation
    A run-on sentence is a sentence that contains two or more clauses but lacks proper punctuation to break it up. This means that the sentence continues without the necessary punctuation marks, such as commas or periods, to separate the different clauses or ideas. As a result, the sentence can become confusing or difficult to read, as it may contain too much information without clear breaks or pauses. To correct a run-on sentence, proper punctuation or sentence structure should be used to separate the clauses and make the sentence clearer and more coherent.

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  • 2. 

    Which of these is a run-on sentence?

    • A.

      Dylan got arrested for being disordery - if only he calmed down this wouldn't have happened.

    • B.

      The turkey chased him all down the street, it was a sight to behold.

    • C.

      Bob burned the pizza again he forgot to take the cardboard out from underneath.

    • D.

      Unfortunately, there are no more single men in this town; you should try another.

    Correct Answer
    C. Bob burned the pizza again he forgot to take the cardboard out from underneath.
    Explanation
    The given sentence, "Bob burned the pizza again he forgot to take the cardboard out from underneath," is a run-on sentence because it consists of two independent clauses ("Bob burned the pizza again" and "he forgot to take the cardboard out from underneath") without any proper punctuation or conjunction to connect them. A run-on sentence occurs when two or more independent clauses are joined together without proper punctuation or conjunctions, resulting in a sentence that is grammatically incorrect.

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  • 3. 

    What is a comma-splice?

    • A.

      When a comma is not used in a sentence to join two independent clauses.

    • B.

      When two or more commas are used in a sentence, breaking it up for no reason.

    • C.

      A love triangle between two sentences and a dastardly comma.

    • D.

      A sentence that has two independent clauses joined together by a comma.

    Correct Answer
    D. A sentence that has two independent clauses joined together by a comma.
    Explanation
    A comma-splice refers to a sentence that has two independent clauses joined together by a comma. This is incorrect because independent clauses should be either separated by a period or joined by a coordinating conjunction. The use of a comma alone is insufficient to properly connect two independent clauses.

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  • 4. 

    Which of the following will fix a comma-splice.

    • A.

      Another comma.

    • B.

      Semicolon and conjunctive adverb.

    • C.

      Scrapping the sentence - there is nothing you can do to save it.

    • D.

      Putting a gerund in the sentence.

    Correct Answer
    B. Semicolon and conjunctive adverb.
    Explanation
    Using a semicolon and a conjunctive adverb can fix a comma-splice. A comma-splice occurs when two independent clauses are joined together with just a comma, which is grammatically incorrect. By using a semicolon, the two independent clauses are properly separated. The conjunctive adverb then helps to connect the two clauses logically, providing a smoother transition between them. This combination of a semicolon and a conjunctive adverb effectively fixes the comma-splice error.

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  • 5. 

    Which of these is an example of a comma-splice?

    • A.

      I went the library to study, but I got nothing done.

    • B.

      It is too late, we will never escape!

    • C.

      In my day, shoes were a luxury!

    • D.

      Marty, you're on fire again.

    Correct Answer
    B. It is too late, we will never escape!
    Explanation
    The sentence "It is too late, we will never escape!" is an example of a comma-splice. A comma-splice occurs when two independent clauses (complete sentences) are joined together with only a comma, which is incorrect punctuation. In this case, "It is too late" and "we will never escape!" are both independent clauses, and they should be separated by a period or joined with a coordinating conjunction such as "and" or "but".

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  • 6. 

    Which of these is NOT a correct way to fix this sentence:I've been to Mars, I never want to go back!

    • A.

      I've been to Mars, and I never want to go back!

    • B.

      I've been to Mars. I never want to go back!

    • C.

      I've been to Mars - therefore I never want to go back!

    • D.

      I've been to Mars, never want to go back!

    Correct Answer
    D. I've been to Mars, never want to go back!
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "I've been to Mars, never want to go back!" because it lacks proper punctuation. The sentence should be separated into two independent clauses with a conjunction or punctuation mark.

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  • 7. 

    True or False: It is impossible to make a sentence with forty or more words and not have it turn into a run-on sentence or comma-splice.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    B. False
    Explanation
    False. This statement is incorrect because it is possible to make a sentence with forty or more words without it turning into a run-on sentence or comma-splice. By using proper punctuation, such as semicolons, conjunctions, and subordinating clauses, a long sentence can be structured correctly and avoid being a run-on sentence.

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  • 8. 

    Which of the following is the correct way to fix this run-on?Godzilla is attacking the city thank goodness Batman is on the case!

    • A.

      Godzilla is attacking the city! Thank goodness Batman is on the case!

    • B.

      Godzilla is attacking the city, but thank goodness Batman is on the case!

    • C.

      Godzilla is attacking the city, however Batman is on the case! We need not worry!

    • D.

      Godzilla is attacking the city, so Baman will take the case!

    • E.

      All of the above.

    Correct Answer
    E. All of the above.
    Explanation
    All of the above options provide correct ways to fix the run-on sentence. The original sentence is a run-on because it combines two independent clauses without proper punctuation or conjunctions. The first option adds an exclamation mark to separate the two clauses. The second option uses a conjunction "but" to connect the clauses. The third option uses a conjunction "however" to connect the clauses and also adds a phrase to emphasize that there is no need to worry. The fourth option replaces "thank goodness" with "so" to create a clear connection between the clauses. Therefore, all of these options provide correct ways to fix the run-on sentence.

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