What Do You Actually Know About Tornado? Trivia Quiz

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What Do You Actually Know About Tornado? Trivia Quiz - Quiz

What do you actually know about the tornado? Scientists, throughout time, have aimed to learn about tornadoes and how to predict them. Most people believe that tornadoes don’t happen at night, which is not entirely true — is that you have followed the discussion about this environmental change, the quiz below is designed to help you learn more. Take it up, and good luck!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    What size diameter is the column of rotating air in a tornado?

    • A.

      Small

    • B.

      Extra Large

    • C.

      Medium

    • D.

      Large

    Correct Answer
    A. Small
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "Small" because tornadoes typically have a narrow and compact column of rotating air. This column can vary in size, but it is generally smaller in diameter compared to other options like Extra Large, Medium, or Large. Tornadoes are known for their destructive power, and their small size allows for concentrated and intense winds within the funnel cloud.

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  • 2. 

    On what date in 2007 was the EF Scale adopted as the standard of tornado intensity in the U.S.?

    • A.

      April 1

    • B.

      1-Jan

    • C.

      1-Mar

    • D.

      1-Feb

    Correct Answer
    D. 1-Feb
    Explanation
    The correct answer is 1-Feb. The EF Scale, also known as the Enhanced Fujita Scale, was adopted as the standard of tornado intensity in the U.S. on February 1, 2007. This scale replaced the original Fujita Scale and is used to categorize tornadoes based on the damage they cause.

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  • 3. 

    What weather event are tornadoes frequently associated with?

    • A.

      Snowstorms

    • B.

      Rain

    • C.

      Sleet

    • D.

      Thunderstorms

    Correct Answer
    D. Thunderstorms
    Explanation
    Tornadoes are frequently associated with thunderstorms. Thunderstorms provide the necessary atmospheric conditions for tornado formation, including warm, moist air near the surface and strong wind shear in the upper atmosphere. These conditions create a rotating column of air, which can develop into a tornado. While tornadoes can occur in different weather conditions, they are most commonly observed during thunderstorms due to the specific combination of factors needed for their formation.

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  • 4. 

    What country reports the second largest number of tornadoes?

    • A.

      United States

    • B.

      United Kingdom

    • C.

      Australia

    • D.

      Canada

    Correct Answer
    D. Canada
    Explanation
    Canada reports the second largest number of tornadoes. While the United States is widely known for its high frequency of tornadoes, Canada also experiences a significant number of tornadoes each year. The geography and weather patterns in certain regions of Canada, particularly the Prairies and the southern parts of Ontario and Quebec, create favorable conditions for tornado formation. Although the number of tornadoes in Canada is lower compared to the United States, it is still the country with the second highest tornado activity in the world.

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  • 5. 

    What room in the house is the best place to stay during a tornado?

    • A.

      Bedroom

    • B.

      Bathroom

    • C.

      Kitchen

    • D.

      Basement

    Correct Answer
    D. Basement
    Explanation
    The basement is the best place to stay during a tornado because it is the most secure and offers the most protection. Being underground provides a barrier against strong winds and flying debris. Additionally, basements often have sturdy walls and support beams that can withstand the force of a tornado. This makes it the safest location in the house during severe weather conditions.

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  • 6. 

    If caught outdoors in a tornado, where should you seek refuge?

    • A.

      A Ditch

    • B.

      A Car

    • C.

      A Phone Booth

    • D.

      A Mountain

    Correct Answer
    A. A Ditch
    Explanation
    During a tornado, seeking refuge in a ditch is the safest option. Ditches are lower lying areas that provide some protection from the strong winds and flying debris. By lying flat in a ditch, you can reduce your exposure to the tornado's destructive forces. It is important to cover your head and neck with your arms or a sturdy object to further protect yourself. Seeking refuge in a car, phone booth, or mountain is not recommended as they do not provide sufficient protection from the tornado's powerful winds and debris.

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  • 7. 

    Who first proposed a scale for use in comparing tornado events?

    • A.

      J. Telesca Johnereo

    • B.

      F. Frank Chin

    • C.

      L. Mike Wang

    • D.

      T. Theodore Fujita

    Correct Answer
    D. T. Theodore Fujita
    Explanation
    T. Theodore Fujita is the correct answer because he was the first person to propose a scale for comparing tornado events. His scale, known as the Fujita Scale or F-Scale, was introduced in 1971 and is still widely used today to measure the intensity of tornadoes based on the damage they cause. Fujita's scale ranges from F0 (weakest) to F5 (strongest), providing a standardized way to classify tornadoes and assess their destructive power.

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  • 8. 

    What does a weak tornado's funnel cloud resemble?

    • A.

      Upward-Opening Cone

    • B.

      Downward-Facing Square

    • C.

      Right-Facing Rectangle

    • D.

      Left-Facing Triangle

    Correct Answer
    A. Upward-Opening Cone
    Explanation
    A weak tornado's funnel cloud resembles an upward-opening cone. This means that the funnel cloud of a weak tornado has a shape similar to a cone, but it is open at the top, with the wider end facing upwards. This shape is commonly observed in weaker tornadoes, where the wind rotation is not as strong and the funnel cloud may not reach all the way to the ground.

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  • 9. 

    How many tornadoes are classified as violent?

    • A.

      50 Percent

    • B.

      All

    • C.

      10 Percent

    • D.

      Two Percent

    Correct Answer
    D. Two Percent
    Explanation
    The answer "Two Percent" suggests that only a small percentage of tornadoes are classified as violent. This indicates that out of all the tornadoes that occur, only a very small fraction, specifically two percent, are considered to be violent.

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  • 10. 

    In some violent tornadoes, where do secondary vortices sometimes form?

    • A.

      Funnel Cloud

    • B.

      Annulus

    • C.

      Core

    • D.

      Central Eye

    Correct Answer
    B. Annulus
    Explanation
    Secondary vortices sometimes form in the annulus of a violent tornado. The annulus refers to the ring-shaped region between the outer edge of the tornado and the main funnel cloud. These secondary vortices can form due to variations in wind speed and direction within the tornado, causing rotation within the annular region. These secondary vortices can be smaller in size compared to the main funnel cloud but can still contribute to the overall destructive power of the tornado.

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  • 11. 

    What is the central axis of airflow circulation in a tornado called?

    • A.

      Tangential Winds

    • B.

      Eye

    • C.

      Nerve Center

    • D.

      Core Region

    Correct Answer
    D. Core Region
    Explanation
    The central axis of airflow circulation in a tornado is called the Core Region. This is the area where the strongest winds and most intense rotation occur. It is the part of the tornado that extends from the ground up to the cloud base. The Core Region is responsible for the destructive power of a tornado, as it is where the most damage is typically observed.

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  • 12. 

    How do researchers classify a tornado?

    • A.

      CZ Scale

    • B.

      WJ Scale

    • C.

      EF Scale

    • D.

      AB Scale

    Correct Answer
    C. EF Scale
    Explanation
    Researchers classify a tornado using the EF Scale. The EF Scale, also known as the Enhanced Fujita Scale, is a measurement scale used to categorize tornadoes based on the damage they cause. It takes into account factors such as wind speed and the type of structures affected. This scale helps researchers understand the intensity and destructive potential of a tornado, allowing them to better analyze and compare tornado events.

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  • 13. 

    What is a little-understood feature of tornadoes?

    • A.

      Core

    • B.

      Suction Vortices

    • C.

      Wind

    • D.

      Eye

    Correct Answer
    B. Suction Vortices
    Explanation
    Suction vortices are a little-understood feature of tornadoes. These are smaller, rotating columns of air that form within the larger tornado. They are often found near the ground and can cause additional damage by intensifying the winds in localized areas. Despite their significance, suction vortices are not well understood due to the difficulty in studying them directly. Their unpredictable nature and the dangers associated with getting close to a tornado make it challenging for scientists to gather data and gain a deeper understanding of these vortices.

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