Pediatrics Ot Exam Questions And Answers

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Pediatrics Ot Exam Questions And Answers - Quiz

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Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    A baby generally begins to sit independently around what age?

    • A.

      10 months

    • B.

      4 months

    • C.

      6 months

    • D.

      7 months

    • E.

      8 months

    Correct Answer
    C. 6 months
    Explanation
    Babies generally begin to sit independently around 6 months of age. At this stage, their muscles and coordination have developed enough to support their body in a seated position. However, it's important to note that the age at which a baby starts sitting independently can vary, and some babies may achieve this milestone a little earlier or later.

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  • 2. 

    Which of the following is a general principles of gross motor development

    • A.

      Head to Toe (Cephalocaudal)

    • B.

      Ranges of Normal

    • C.

      Proximal to Distal

    • D.

      Nature & Nurture

    • E.

      Gross to Fine

    • F.

      All of the above

    • G.

      None of the above

    Correct Answer
    F. All of the above
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "All of the above". This means that all of the options listed - Head to Toe (Cephalocaudal), Ranges of Normal, Proximal to Distal, Nature & Nurture, and Gross to Fine - are general principles of gross motor development. These principles describe various aspects of how gross motor skills develop in individuals, including the sequence of development from head to toe, the range of what is considered normal development, the development from the center of the body outwards, the influence of both genetics and environment on development, and the progression from large movements to more precise movements.

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  • 3. 

    In order for a baby to creep on hands and knees, what reflex must be integrated?

    • A.

      Tonic Labyrinthine Reflex (TLR)

    • B.

      Symmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex (STNR)

    • C.

      Moro Reflex

    • D.

      Landau Reflex

    Correct Answer
    B. Symmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex (STNR)
    Explanation
    The Symmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex (STNR) must be integrated in order for a baby to creep on hands and knees. This reflex is activated when the baby's head is flexed or extended, causing the arms to extend and the legs to flex, allowing the baby to move in a crawling position. Integration of this reflex is an important milestone in a baby's motor development, as it enables them to transition from crawling on their belly to crawling on hands and knees.

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  • 4. 

    When _______ reflex is integrated, protective reactions emerge

    • A.

      Symmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex (STNR)

    • B.

      Moros Reflex

    • C.

      Tonic Labyrinthine Reflex (TLR)

    • D.

      Landau Reflex

    Correct Answer
    B. Moros Reflex
    Explanation
    When the Moro reflex is integrated, protective reactions emerge. The Moro reflex is an involuntary response that occurs in infants when they are startled or feel a sudden change in their environment. It is characterized by the baby throwing their arms and legs out, followed by bringing them back in towards their body. This reflex helps the baby to protect themselves by grabbing onto their caregiver or any nearby object for support. As the baby grows and develops, this reflex is integrated into more controlled and intentional movements, allowing them to react and protect themselves in a more coordinated manner.

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  • 5. 

    Prone on elbows occurs at approximately what age range?

    • A.

      6 to 8 months

    • B.

      3 to 5 months

    • C.

      4 to 6 months

    • D.

      2 to 4 months

    Correct Answer
    B. 3 to 5 months
    Explanation
    Prone on elbows typically occurs at around 3 to 5 months of age. This refers to the stage when a baby is able to lift their upper body off the ground while lying on their stomach, using their elbows for support. It is an important milestone in their motor development and helps strengthen their neck, shoulder, and arm muscles, preparing them for crawling and other physical activities.

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  • 6. 

    A baby that has developed the ability to push up on extended arms has integrated what reflex?

    • A.

      Symmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex (STNR)

    • B.

      Moros Reflex

    • C.

      Tonic Labyrinthine Reflex (TLR)

    • D.

      Landau Reflex

    Correct Answer
    C. Tonic Labyrinthine Reflex (TLR)
    Explanation
    The Tonic Labyrinthine Reflex (TLR) is the correct answer because this reflex is present in infants and helps them in pushing up on extended arms. The TLR is activated when the baby's head is tilted back, causing the extension of the arms and legs. This reflex is important for the development of motor skills and coordination in babies. The other reflexes mentioned, such as the Symmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex (STNR), Moros Reflex, and Landau Reflex, are not directly related to the ability to push up on extended arms.

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  • 7. 

    What is the average age range for walking to occur?

    • A.

      7 to 9 months

    • B.

      6 to 8 months

    • C.

      Over 12 months

    • D.

      10 to 12 months

    Correct Answer
    D. 10 to 12 months
    Explanation
    The average age range for walking to occur is typically between 10 to 12 months. This is the period when most infants start to develop the necessary strength and coordination to take their first steps. While some babies may begin walking earlier or later than this range, 10 to 12 months is considered the average age for this milestone to occur.

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  • 8. 

    Which of the following develops last?

    • A.

      Movements in Extension

    • B.

      Movements in Flexion

    • C.

      Movements in Rotation

    Correct Answer
    C. Movements in Rotation
    Explanation
    Movements in rotation typically develop last because they require a higher level of coordination and control compared to movements in extension or flexion. Rotation involves twisting or turning a body part, such as the head or trunk, around its axis. This movement requires the coordination of multiple muscles and joints to execute smoothly and accurately. In contrast, movements in extension and flexion involve simpler movements of straightening or bending a body part, which can be mastered earlier in development.

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  • 9. 

    Which of the following develops first?

    • A.

      Movements in Extension

    • B.

      Movements in Flexion

    • C.

      Movements in Rotation

    Correct Answer
    B. Movements in Flexion
    Explanation
    Movements in Flexion develop first because flexion is the bending movement that decreases the angle between two body parts. It is a fundamental movement that occurs in various joints in the body, such as the elbows, knees, and spine. Flexion is often one of the earliest movements observed in infants as they develop motor control. On the other hand, movements in extension involve straightening or increasing the angle between body parts, and movements in rotation involve turning or twisting. While both extension and rotation are important movements, they typically develop after flexion.

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  • 10. 

    Once a baby is able to pull up to standing. the next gross motor milestone is what?

    • A.

      Standing up in open space without help

    • B.

      Furniture surfing

    • C.

      Standing up in open space and walking without help

    • D.

      None of the above

    Correct Answer
    B. Furniture surfing
    Explanation
    Once a baby is able to pull up to standing, the next gross motor milestone is furniture surfing. This means that the baby is able to stand up using furniture or other objects for support and balance. It is a stepping stone towards standing up in open space without help and eventually walking without assistance.

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  • 11. 

    Which of the following is NOT a gross motor milestone for birth to 2 months

    • A.

      Physiological flexion

    • B.

      Reflexes

    • C.

      Head lag when pulled to sitting

    • D.

      Hands fisted

    • E.

      At 2 months starts to push up in prone position

    • F.

      Can do anything in a Prone position

    Correct Answer
    F. Can do anything in a Prone position
    Explanation
    The given answer, "Can do anything in a Prone position," is not a gross motor milestone for birth to 2 months. Gross motor milestones at this age include physiological flexion, reflexes, head lag when pulled to sitting, and hands fisted. At 2 months, the baby starts to push up in the prone position, but it does not mean they can do anything in that position.

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  • 12. 

    Which of the following is NOT a gross motor milestone for 3 to 5 months

    • A.

      Able to sit alone

    • B.

      Able to be totally prone on elbows at 3 months

    • C.

      Able to be prone on extended arms with weight shift to reach at 5 months

    • D.

      Able to roll in both directions between 4 to 5 months

    • E.

      No head lag when pulled to sitting between 4 to 5 months

    • F.

      Back is rounded when sitting

    Correct Answer
    A. Able to sit alone
  • 13. 

    Which of the following is NOT a gross motor milestone for 6 to 7 months

    • A.

      Sits alone

    • B.

      Able to crawl

    • C.

      Protective extension (forward)

    • D.

      Feet to mouth

    Correct Answer
    A. Sits alone
    Explanation
    At 6 to 7 months, a baby should be able to sit alone, crawl, and perform protective extension (forward) movements. The milestone that is NOT a gross motor milestone for this age range is "Feet to mouth." This refers to the ability to bring their feet up to their mouth, which typically occurs around 4 to 5 months of age.

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  • 14. 

    Which of the following is NOT a gross motor milestone for 8 to 9 months

    • A.

      Crawling

    • B.

      Walking

    • C.

      Pulls to stand

    • D.

      Protective extension (sideways in sitting)

    Correct Answer
    B. Walking
    Explanation
    Walking is not a gross motor milestone for 8 to 9 months. At this age, babies typically start crawling, pulling themselves up to stand, and demonstrating protective extension (sideways in sitting) as part of their gross motor development. Walking usually occurs around the age of 12 to 15 months, so it is not expected at 8 to 9 months.

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  • 15. 

    Which of the following is NOT a gross motor milestone for 10 to 12 months

    • A.

      Cruises along furniture

    • B.

      Protective extension (Sideways rotation)

    • C.

      Protective extension (backwards in sitting)

    • D.

      Walks

    Correct Answer
    B. Protective extension (Sideways rotation)
    Explanation
    By 10 to 12 months, babies typically achieve several gross motor milestones, including cruising along furniture, protective extension backwards in sitting, and walking. However, protective extension sideways rotation is not a typical gross motor milestone during this age range. This refers to the ability to extend the arm sideways to protect oneself from falling.

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  • 16. 

    Which of the following is a general principle of Fine Motor Development

    • A.

      Proximal to distal

    • B.

      Voluntary grasp precedes voluntary release

    • C.

      Grasping directional development will move ulnar to radial

    • D.

      Mass to specific

    • E.

      Combination of stability and mobility

    • F.

      All of the above

    • G.

      None of the above

    Correct Answer
    F. All of the above
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "All of the above". This means that all of the options listed are general principles of Fine Motor Development. These principles include proximal to distal development, where control of the larger muscles develops before control of the smaller muscles; voluntary grasp preceding voluntary release, where a child learns to hold objects before learning to let go of them; grasping directional development moving ulnar to radial, meaning that a child first learns to grasp with their whole hand before developing a pincer grasp with their fingers; and the combination of stability and mobility, which refers to the need for both a stable base and the ability to move and manipulate objects.

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  • 17. 

    Which of the following is NOT a component of Hand Function?

    • A.

      Fine motor skills

    • B.

      Visual skills

    • C.

      Visual perceptual skills

    • D.

      Visual motor skills

    • E.

      Sensory feedback: tactile/proprioceptive

    • F.

      All the above

    • G.

      None of the above

    Correct Answer
    G. None of the above
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "None of the above." This means that all of the options listed are components of hand function. Fine motor skills, visual skills, visual perceptual skills, visual motor skills, and sensory feedback (tactile/proprioceptive) are all important components that contribute to hand function.

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  • 18. 

    Which of the following is NOT a fine motor skill?

    • A.

      Reach

    • B.

      Grasp

    • C.

      Carry 

    • D.

      Release

    • E.

      In hand manipulation of objects 

    • F.

      Bilateral hand skills

    • G.

      All the above

    • H.

      None of the above

    Correct Answer
    H. None of the above
    Explanation
    The given answer is "None of the above" because all of the options listed - Reach, Grasp, Carry, Release, In hand manipulation of objects, and Bilateral hand skills - are fine motor skills. Fine motor skills involve the use of small muscles in the hands and fingers to perform precise and coordinated movements.

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  • 19. 

    Which of the following is TRUE in the process of evaluation

    • A.

      The process used is to determine an individual's wants and needs

    • B.

      Evaluation occurs after a deficit has been discovered with a screening or referral with a diagnosis

    • C.

      Evaluations can be implemented more than once, and is ongoing throughout your relationship with a client (Most of the times you reassess specific parts of the initial evaluation

    • D.

      All of the above

    Correct Answer
    D. All of the above
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "All of the above". This means that all of the statements mentioned in the options are true in the process of evaluation. The process of evaluation involves determining an individual's wants and needs, conducting evaluations after a deficit has been discovered, and implementing evaluations more than once and ongoing throughout the relationship with a client. Reassessing specific parts of the initial evaluation is also a common practice in evaluations.

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  • 20. 

    What is the following reflex?

    • A.

      Moro's

    • B.

      Rooting

    • C.

      Sucking/swallowing

    • D.

      ATNR

    Correct Answer
    B. Rooting
    Explanation
    Rooting reflex is a natural instinct observed in newborns where they turn their head and open their mouth towards a stimulus that touches their cheek or mouth. This reflex helps infants find the source of nourishment by guiding them towards the breast or bottle for feeding. The correct answer, "Rooting," accurately identifies this reflex.

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  • 21. 

    What is the following reflex?

    • A.

      Sucking/swallowing

    • B.

      ATNR

    • C.

      Moro's

    • D.

      STNR

    Correct Answer
    A. Sucking/swallowing
    Explanation
    Sucking/swallowing is a reflex that is present in infants and allows them to feed by coordinating the muscles involved in sucking and swallowing. This reflex is essential for their survival and development as it ensures they can take in the necessary nutrients for growth. It is an instinctive response triggered by the presence of a nipple or other stimuli in the mouth, causing the baby to suck and swallow. This reflex gradually diminishes as the baby grows and is replaced by voluntary control over feeding.

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  • 22. 

    What is the following reflex?

    • A.

      Palmar grasp

    • B.

      STNR

    • C.

      Plantar grasp

    • D.

      Rooting

    Correct Answer
    A. Palmar grasp
    Explanation
    The palmar grasp reflex is a reflex that is commonly observed in infants. When an object is placed in the infant's palm and their fingers close around it, it is known as the palmar grasp reflex. This reflex is present at birth and typically disappears around 6 months of age. It is believed to be a primitive reflex that helps infants develop their fine motor skills and grasp objects.

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  • 23. 

    What is the following reflex?

    • A.

      TLR

    • B.

      Rooting

    • C.

      ATNR

    • D.

      Moro's 

    Correct Answer
    D. Moro's 
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Moro's reflex. Moro's reflex is a primitive reflex that is present in newborn babies. It is characterized by the baby suddenly extending their arms and legs, arching their back, and then bringing their arms back in a hugging motion. This reflex is triggered by a sudden change in position or a loud noise, and it is thought to be a protective reflex that helps the baby respond to potential danger.

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  • 24. 

    What is the following reflex?

    • A.

      Moro's

    • B.

      Palmar Grasp

    • C.

      Plantar Grasp

    • D.

      TLR

    Correct Answer
    C. Plantar Grasp
    Explanation
    The plantar grasp reflex is a normal response in infants where they curl their toes around an object that touches the sole of their foot. This reflex is present at birth and usually disappears by around 9 months of age. It is believed to be a primitive reflex that helps infants grasp onto their caregiver or other objects for support. The reflex is important for the development of motor skills and coordination in infants.

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  • 25. 

    What is the following reflex?

    • A.

      Tonic Labyrinthine Reflex

    • B.

      Symmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex

    • C.

      Asymmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex

    • D.

      Landu

    Correct Answer
    C. Asymmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex
    Explanation
    The Asymmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex (ATNR) is a reflex that is present in infants and typically disappears by 6 months of age. It is triggered when the head is turned to one side, causing the arm and leg on that side to extend while the opposite arm and leg flex. This reflex helps with the development of hand-eye coordination and facilitates reaching and grasping objects.

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  • 26. 

    What is the following reflex?

    • A.

      Tonic Labyrinthine Reflex

    • B.

      Asymmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex

    • C.

      Symmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex

    • D.

      Landau

    Correct Answer
    C. Symmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex
    Explanation
    The Symmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex (STNR) is a reflex that occurs in infants and is characterized by the extension of the arms and flexion of the legs when the head is extended, and flexion of the arms and extension of the legs when the head is flexed. This reflex helps with the coordination of movement and the development of posture and balance in infants.

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  • 27. 

    What is the following reflex?

    • A.

      Tonic Labyrinthine Reflex

    • B.

      Asymmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex

    • C.

      Symmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex

    • D.

      Landau

    Correct Answer
    A. Tonic Labyrinthine Reflex
    Explanation
    The Tonic Labyrinthine Reflex is a reflex that is present in infants and is characterized by an automatic response to changes in head position. When the head is tilted forward or backward, the reflex causes the body to respond with corresponding movements. For example, if the head is tilted forward, the limbs will flex, and if the head is tilted backward, the limbs will extend. This reflex helps infants maintain their balance and posture.

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  • 28. 

    What is the following reflex? 

    • A.

      Tonic Labyrinthine Reflex

    • B.

      Symmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex

    • C.

      Asymmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex

    • D.

      Landau

    Correct Answer
    D. Landau
    Explanation
    The Landau reflex is a primitive reflex that is typically present in infants. It is characterized by the baby's ability to hold their head and upper body up when placed in a prone (face-down) position. This reflex helps to develop and strengthen the muscles in the neck, back, and core, preparing the baby for future motor skills such as crawling and sitting up. The Landau reflex usually disappears around 6 to 12 months of age as the baby gains more control over their body and develops more advanced motor skills.

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  • 29. 

    Which of the following is an important interaction pertaining to Social/Emotional development

    • A.

      Individual

    • B.

      Significant others

    • C.

      Interaction in groups

    • D.

      All the above 

    • E.

      None of the above

    Correct Answer
    D. All the above 
    Explanation
    An important interaction pertaining to social/emotional development is all of the above. This means that individual interactions, interactions with significant others, and interactions in groups all play a significant role in social/emotional development. These interactions help individuals develop important social skills, emotional intelligence, and the ability to form and maintain relationships with others.

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  • 30. 

    Select the following pertaining to components of occupation in children and adolescents that are dependent on social/emotional development?

    • A.

      Play -- comfort level of interaction between other individuals 

    • B.

      Feeding

    • C.

      Learning another language --> incorporate understanding of what people are saying for effective communication and social interaction

    • D.

      Sleep --> impacts self control during the day and they will carrier that within their interactions throughout the day

    Correct Answer
    A. Play -- comfort level of interaction between other individuals 
    Explanation
    Play is a component of occupation in children and adolescents that is dependent on social/emotional development because it involves the comfort level of interaction between other individuals. During play, children and adolescents engage in various social interactions, such as taking turns, sharing, and cooperating with others. Their ability to interact comfortably with others during play is influenced by their social and emotional development, including their understanding of social cues, empathy, and ability to regulate their emotions. This comfort level of interaction during play has a significant impact on their social skills and relationships with others.

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  • 31. 

    Which of the following is NOT true pertaining to Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE)

    • A.

      Traumatic events before 18 yrs

    • B.

      67% of population

    • C.

      Trauma has significant impact on health, wellness, and ability to engage in everyday occupations

    • D.

      The higher the ACE score, the worse the long-term health outcomes 

    • E.

      None of the above

    • F.

      All of the above

    Correct Answer
    E. None of the above
    Explanation
    The statement "None of the above" is the correct answer because all of the statements mentioned are true pertaining to Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE). Traumatic events before the age of 18 affect around 67% of the population and have a significant impact on health, wellness, and the ability to engage in everyday occupations. Additionally, research shows that the higher the ACE score, which is a measure of the number of traumatic experiences, the worse the long-term health outcomes. Therefore, none of the statements mentioned are false regarding ACE.

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  • 32. 

    A child having a strong identity offers a sense of self-efficacy (Sense of worth) and self-determination (Competence, Autonomy, & Relatedness)

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    Having a strong identity is indeed associated with a sense of self-efficacy and self-determination. When a child has a strong identity, they have a clear understanding of who they are, their values, and their abilities. This sense of self allows them to feel competent and capable, which in turn increases their self-efficacy. Additionally, a strong identity also promotes autonomy and relatedness. Autonomy refers to the ability to make independent choices and decisions, while relatedness refers to the sense of belonging and connection with others. Both autonomy and relatedness contribute to a child's self-determination. Therefore, the statement that a child having a strong identity offers a sense of self-efficacy and self-determination is true.

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  • 33. 

    Children who are ________ develop positive interpersonal skills and competence despite stressful or traumatic experiences known to limit developmental potential (e.g. foster care or traumatic brain injury). Protective factors support this 

    Correct Answer
    Resilient
    Explanation
    Children who are resilient develop positive interpersonal skills and competence despite stressful or traumatic experiences known to limit developmental potential (e.g. foster care or traumatic brain injury). Resilience refers to the ability to bounce back from adversity and overcome challenges. Resilient children are able to adapt and thrive in the face of difficult circumstances, and they are more likely to develop the necessary skills and competencies to navigate through life successfully. Protective factors, such as supportive relationships, a positive school environment, and access to resources, contribute to the development of resilience in children.

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  • 34. 

    Which of the following is a characteristic of play?

    • A.

      Intrinsic motivation

    • B.

      Active engagement

    • C.

      Suspension of reality

    • D.

      Internal locus of control

    • E.

      All of the above

    • F.

      None of the above

    Correct Answer
    E. All of the above
    Explanation
    All of the options listed, intrinsic motivation, active engagement, suspension of reality, and internal locus of control, are characteristics of play. Intrinsic motivation refers to the internal desire and enjoyment that comes from engaging in play. Active engagement means being fully involved and participating actively in the play activity. Suspension of reality refers to the ability to temporarily detach from real-world constraints and immerse oneself in the play experience. Internal locus of control means having a sense of control and autonomy over the play activity. Therefore, all of these characteristics are present in play.

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  • 35. 

    Select the ones that are functions/theories of play:

    • A.

      Surplus energy

    • B.

      Recreational or relaxing

    • C.

      Practice or preexercise

    • D.

      Recapitulation (first play with objects; then people)

    • E.

      Recapitulation (first play with objects; then people)

    • F.

      Psychoanalytic (Gathering a better understanding of the external environement)

    • G.

      Arousal modulation

    • H.

      Metacommunicative

    • I.

      Cognitive

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Surplus energy
    B. Recreational or relaxing
    C. Practice or preexercise
    D. Recapitulation (first play with objects; then people)
    E. Recapitulation (first play with objects; then people)
    F. Psychoanalytic (Gathering a better understanding of the external environement)
    G. Arousal modulation
    H. Metacommunicative
    I. Cognitive
    Explanation
    The given answer includes various functions/theories of play. Surplus energy refers to the idea that play allows individuals to release excess energy. Recreational or relaxing play provides a form of leisure and enjoyment. Practice or preexercise play allows individuals to develop and improve their skills. Recapitulation play involves imitating and practicing adult roles and responsibilities. Psychoanalytic play helps individuals understand and explore their external environment. Arousal modulation play helps individuals regulate their arousal levels. Metacommunicative play involves using play to communicate and understand social interactions. Cognitive play involves using play to develop cognitive skills and problem-solving abilities.

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  • 36. 

    There is an optimal level of difficulty and time/skills required in order to achieve an effective flow of developmental play

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    This statement suggests that there is a specific level of difficulty and the required time/skills needed to achieve an effective flow in developmental play. This means that for play to be beneficial for development, it should not be too easy or too difficult, and the time and skills needed should be appropriate for the individual. This aligns with the concept of "optimal level of challenge" in play, where individuals are engaged and motivated when the activity is neither too easy nor too difficult for them.

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  • 37. 

    ________ is the state in which people are so involved in an activity that nothing else seems to matter; the experience is so enjoyable that people will do it even at great cost, for the sheer sake of doing it"

    Correct Answer
    Flow
    Explanation
    Flow is a psychological state where individuals are completely immersed in an activity, to the point where they lose track of time and become fully engaged. In this state, people are so focused and involved in the task at hand that they experience a sense of enjoyment and fulfillment. The experience of flow is so rewarding that individuals are willing to invest significant effort and sacrifice other things in order to continue engaging in the activity.

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  • 38. 

    Which of the following is how children lack appropriate play skills

    • A.

      Motor related impairs

    • B.

      Lack of opportunity

    • C.

      Lack of social awareness

    • D.

      Lack of "playfulness"

    • E.

      All the above

    • F.

      None of the above

    Correct Answer
    E. All the above
    Explanation
    Children can lack appropriate play skills due to various reasons. Motor related impairments can hinder their ability to engage in physical activities and manipulate objects during play. Lack of opportunity refers to situations where children do not have access to suitable play environments or materials, which can limit their play skills development. Lack of social awareness can affect their ability to interact and engage with peers during play. Finally, lack of "playfulness" implies a lack of interest or enjoyment in play activities, which can also hinder the development of appropriate play skills. Therefore, all of the options mentioned (motor related impairments, lack of opportunity, lack of social awareness, and lack of "playfulness") can contribute to children lacking appropriate play skills.

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  • 39. 

    Which of the following is a consequence of play deprivation

    • A.

      Delayed development

    • B.

      Self stimulation

    • C.

      Difficulties with social interaction

    • D.

      Difficulties with mental health

    • E.

      All the above

    • F.

      None of the above

    Correct Answer
    E. All the above
    Explanation
    Play deprivation can have several negative consequences on individuals. Delayed development is one of these consequences, as play helps children develop cognitive, physical, and social skills. Self-stimulation is another consequence, as individuals may engage in repetitive behaviors or seek sensory input when deprived of play opportunities. Difficulties with social interaction can also arise from play deprivation, as play is an important context for learning social skills and forming relationships. Additionally, play deprivation can contribute to difficulties with mental health, as play serves as a natural outlet for stress and promotes emotional well-being. Therefore, all of the above options are consequences of play deprivation.

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  • 40. 

    A 9 month old child picks up a block with a what typical grasp pattern for her age

    • A.

      Supinated palmer grasp

    • B.

      Radial digit grasp

    • C.

      Digital Pronate Grasp

    • D.

      Static Tripod Grasp

    Correct Answer
    B. Radial digit grasp
    Explanation
    The radial digit grasp is a typical grasp pattern for a 9-month-old child. At this age, the child uses their thumb and index finger to hold objects, forming a circular shape with their fingers around the object. This grasp allows for a more precise and controlled grip on the block. The supinated palmer grasp involves using the whole hand to grasp objects, the digital pronate grasp involves using the fingers with the palm facing down, and the static tripod grasp involves using the thumb, index, and middle fingers to hold objects, which are not typical for a 9-month-old child.

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  • 41. 

    Which of the following is in the correct order from youngest to oldest 

    • A.

      Dynamic Tripod Grasp -> Static Tripod Grasp -> Quadrupod Grasp -> Digital Pronate Grasp -> Palmar Supinate Grasp -> Pincer Grasp

    • B.

      Pincer Grasp -> Palmar Supinate Grasp -> Static Tripod Grasp -> Quadrupod Grasp -> Digital Pronate Grasp -> Dynamic Tripod Grasp 

    • C.

      Pincer Grasp -> Palmar Supinate Grasp -> Digital Pronate Grasp -> Quadrupod Grasp -> Static Tripod Grasp -> Dynamic Tripod Grasp

    • D.

      Palmar Supinate Grasp -> Pincer Grasp -> Digital Pronate Grasp -> Quadrupod Grasp -> Static Tripod Grasp -> Dynamic Tripod Grasp 

    Correct Answer
    C. Pincer Grasp -> Palmar Supinate Grasp -> Digital Pronate Grasp -> Quadrupod Grasp -> Static Tripod Grasp -> Dynamic Tripod Grasp
    Explanation
    The correct answer is in the correct order from youngest to oldest because the pincer grasp is the earliest grasp to develop, followed by the palmar supinate grasp, digital pronate grasp, quadrupod grasp, static tripod grasp, and finally the dynamic tripod grasp. This progression reflects the development of fine motor skills in children, starting with the ability to pick up small objects with the thumb and index finger (pincer grasp) and gradually gaining more control and precision in hand movements.

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  • 42. 

    Put the following in developmental order

    • A.

      Imitates a vertical line -> copies a cross -> copies a circle

    • B.

      Imitates a vertical line -> copies a circle -> copies a cross

    • C.

      Copies a circle -> copies a cross -> imitates a vertical line

    • D.

      Copies a cross -> imitates a vertical line -> Copies a circle

    Correct Answer
    B. Imitates a vertical line -> copies a circle -> copies a cross
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "Imitates a vertical line -> copies a circle -> copies a cross" because it follows a logical progression of increasing complexity. Imitating a vertical line is the simplest task, followed by copying a circle which requires more precision and coordination. Finally, copying a cross involves the most complex shapes and requires the ability to replicate multiple lines intersecting each other.

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  • 43. 

    A typical 6-month old baby will display what type of reach pattern?

    • A.

      A unilateral reach pattern, with an over extended hand

    • B.

      A bilateral reach pattern, with an over extended hand 

    • C.

      A symmetrical reach pattern, with an over extended hand

    • D.

      An asymmetrical reach pattern, with an over extended hand 

    Correct Answer
    A. A unilateral reach pattern, with an over extended hand
    Explanation
    A typical 6-month-old baby will display a unilateral reach pattern, with an overextended hand. This means that the baby will reach out with one hand at a time, rather than using both hands simultaneously. The hand will be overextended, meaning that the baby will stretch their arm out further than necessary to reach for an object. This is a normal developmental milestone for infants at this age, as they are beginning to explore and interact with their environment.

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  • 44. 

    A typical baby will be able to pick up a cheerio with a superior (or neat) pincer grasp by the following age range

    • A.

      4 to 6 months

    • B.

      10 to 12 months

    • C.

      7 to 9 months

    • D.

      12 to 24 months

    Correct Answer
    B. 10 to 12 months
    Explanation
    A baby's pincer grasp refers to the ability to use the thumb and index finger to pick up small objects. This fine motor skill typically develops between 9 and 12 months of age. By 10 to 12 months, a baby should have developed a superior pincer grasp, allowing them to pick up small items like a cheerio with precision and control. Therefore, the correct answer is 10 to 12 months.

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  • 45. 

    Put the following in developmental order

    • A.

      Ulnar Palmar Grasp -> Radial Palmar Grasp -> Radial Digital Grasp -> Palmar Grasp

    • B.

      Radial Digital Grasp -> Radial Palmar Grasp -> Palmar Grasp -> Ulnar Palmar Grasp

    • C.

      Ulnar Palmar Grasp -> Palmar Grasp -> Radial Palmar Grasp -> Radial Digital Grasp

    • D.

      Radial Digital Grasp -> Radial Palmar Grasp -> Ulnar Palmar Grasp -> Palmar Grasp 

    Correct Answer
    C. Ulnar Palmar Grasp -> Palmar Grasp -> Radial Palmar Grasp -> Radial Digital Grasp
    Explanation
    The correct developmental order starts with the Ulnar Palmar Grasp, followed by the Palmar Grasp, then the Radial Palmar Grasp, and finally the Radial Digital Grasp. This order represents the progression of hand movements and grasping abilities in infants. The Ulnar Palmar Grasp is typically seen in newborns, where they curl their fingers around an object. As they develop, they transition to the Palmar Grasp, where they use their whole hand to grasp objects. The Radial Palmar Grasp involves using the thumb and fingers to hold objects, and finally, the Radial Digital Grasp involves using the thumb and index finger to pick up small objects.

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  • 46. 

    Transferring an object from hand to hand typically occurs by what age?

    • A.

      6 month

    • B.

      10 months

    • C.

      4 months

    • D.

      12 months 

    Correct Answer
    A. 6 month
    Explanation
    Babies typically start transferring objects from hand to hand around the age of 6 months. At this stage, their fine motor skills and hand-eye coordination have developed enough to grasp objects and pass them from one hand to the other. This milestone is an important step in their physical and cognitive development, as it allows them to explore and interact with their environment in a more coordinated manner.

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  • 47. 

    An 18-month-old will typically grasp a crayon/marker with what type of grasp

    • A.

      Supinated Palmar Grasp

    • B.

      Static Tripod Grasp

    • C.

      Dynamic Tripod Grasp

    • D.

      Static Tripod Grasp

    Correct Answer
    A. Supinated Palmar Grasp
    Explanation
    An 18-month-old will typically grasp a crayon/marker with a Supinated Palmar Grasp. This means that the child will hold the writing utensil with their palm facing upwards and their thumb pointing towards the ceiling. This grasp allows for better control and stability while using the crayon/marker. The Static Tripod Grasp and Dynamic Tripod Grasp are typically seen in older children, around 3-4 years old, where they hold the writing utensil with their thumb, index, and middle fingers, while the pencil rests on their ring and pinky fingers.

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  • 48. 

    Which of the following is FALSE pertaining to Attachment Theory

    • A.

      Healthy attachment occurs when infant's needs are met 

    • B.

      Mistrust is a important aspect of social development

    • C.

      Bonding occurs during feeding, cuddling, caregiver contact

    • D.

      Early attachment is important for development of trust, which is the basis for future relationships

    Correct Answer
    B. Mistrust is a important aspect of social development
  • 49. 

    Which of the following is FALSE pertaining to Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE)

    • A.

      Traumatic events before 18 yrs

    • B.

      67% of population

    • C.

      Trauma has significant impact on health, wellness, and ability to engage in everyday occupations

    • D.

      The higher the ACE score, the worse the long-term health outcomes

    • E.

      The lower the ACE score, the worse the long-term health outcomes

    Correct Answer
    E. The lower the ACE score, the worse the long-term health outcomes
  • 50. 

    Children who are resilient develop positive interpersonal skills and competence despite stressful or traumatic experiences known to limit developmental potential (e.g., foster care or traumatic brain injury); Protective factors support resiliency 

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    Resilient children are able to develop positive interpersonal skills and competence even in the face of stressful or traumatic experiences that can hinder their development. Protective factors play a crucial role in supporting resiliency.

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Quiz Review Timeline +

Our quizzes are rigorously reviewed, monitored and continuously updated by our expert board to maintain accuracy, relevance, and timeliness.

  • Current Version
  • Mar 22, 2023
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team
  • Mar 04, 2021
    Quiz Created by
    Catherine Halcomb
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