Poetry Terms Assessment

43 Questions
Poetry Terms Assessment

This test covers types of poems and figures of speach.

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Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Poem that is often sung; tells a story; originally passed down orally is a
    • A. 

      Ballad

    • B. 

      Elegy

    • C. 

      Lyric

    • D. 

      Epic

    • E. 

      Ode

  • 2. 
    A short poem in which the speaker expresses personal feelings about the subject and is often meant to be sung is a
    • A. 

      Elegy

    • B. 

      Lyric

    • C. 

      Sonnett

    • D. 

      Ode

    • E. 

      Limerick

  • 3. 
    Giving human characteristics to non-human objects is
    • A. 

      Alliteration

    • B. 

      Imagery

    • C. 

      Personification

    • D. 

      Hyperbole

    • E. 

      Metaphor

  • 4. 
    There was a Young Lady of Portugal,Whose ideas were excessively nautical:She climbed up a tree,To examine the sea,But declared she would never leave Portugal.What type of poem is this?
    • A. 

      Ballad

    • B. 

      Limerick

    • C. 

      Ode

    • D. 

      Elegy

    • E. 

      Sonnett

  • 5. 
    "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?" - William Shakespeare Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer's lease hath all too short a date: Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, And often is his gold complexion dimm'd; And every fair from fair sometime declines, By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimm'd; But thy eternal summer shall not fade, Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest; Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade, When in eternal lines to time thou growest; So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see, So long lives this, and this gives life to thee. What type of poem is this?
    • A. 

      Limerick

    • B. 

      Ode

    • C. 

      Elegy

    • D. 

      Sonnett

    • E. 

      Ballad

  • 6. 
    Words or phrases that mean exactly what they say are ____ phrases.
    • A. 

      Connatation

    • B. 

      Literal

    • C. 

      Figurative

    • D. 

      Denotation

    • E. 

      Imagery

  • 7. 
    "The road was a ribbion of moonlight"This line is an example of ______.
    • A. 

      Simile

    • B. 

      Metaphor

    • C. 

      Personification

    • D. 

      Idiom

    • E. 

      Hyperbole

  • 8. 
    "Shame is Pride's Cloak"This line is an example of a _____.
    • A. 

      Metaphor

    • B. 

      Hyperbole

    • C. 

      Idiom

    • D. 

      Simile

    • E. 

      Personification

  • 9. 
    "You can catch more flies with honey than you can with vinegar."This is an example of a(n) ______.
    • A. 

      Personification

    • B. 

      Idiom

    • C. 

      Simile

    • D. 

      Metaphor

    • E. 

      Hyperbole

  • 10. 
    "Let sleeping dogs lie"This is an example of a(n) __________.
    • A. 

      Idiom

    • B. 

      Simile

    • C. 

      Metaphor

    • D. 

      Personification

    • E. 

      Hyperbole

  • 11. 
    An intentional exaggeration usually revealing a truth is known as  
    • A. 

      Hyperbole

    • B. 

      Imagery

    • C. 

      Metaphor

    • D. 

      Oxymoron

    • E. 

      Simile

  • 12. 
    A comparsion of two things in which the comparison is implied; does not use like or as is know as  
    • A. 

      Metaphor

    • B. 

      Allusion

    • C. 

      Simile

    • D. 

      Personificiation

    • E. 

      Hyperbole

  • 13. 
    A comparison carried out through the entire poem is know as a(n)
    • A. 

      Limerick

    • B. 

      Onomatopoeia

    • C. 

      Imagery

    • D. 

      Allusion

    • E. 

      Extended metaphor

  • 14. 
    A reference to familiar people, places events, or literary works not directly mentioned in the text
    • A. 

      Alliteration

    • B. 

      Allusion

    • C. 

      Metaphore

    • D. 

      Oxymoron

    • E. 

      Onomatopoeia

  • 15. 
    The feeling created in the reader by the author is the 
    • A. 

      Connotation

    • B. 

      Denotation

    • C. 

      Mood

    • D. 

      Tone

    • E. 

      Figurative

  • 16. 
    A poem that has no rhythm and no rhyme or meter is known as  
    • A. 

      Free verse

    • B. 

      Limerick

    • C. 

      Ballad

    • D. 

      Ode

    • E. 

      Elegy

  • 17. 
    Walt Whitman (1819–1892). I Hear America Singing
    I HEAR America singing, the varied carols I hear;  
    Those of mechanics—each one singing his, as it should be, blithe and strong;  
    The carpenter singing his, as he measures his plank or beam,  
    The mason singing his, as he makes ready for work, or leaves off work;  
    The boatman singing what belongs to him in his boat—the deckhand singing on the steamboat deck;          5
    The shoemaker singing as he sits on his bench—the hatter singing as he stands;  
    The wood-cutter’s song—the ploughboy’s, on his way in the morning, or at the noon intermission, or at sundown;  
    The delicious singing of the mother—or of the young wife at work—or of the girl sewing or washing—Each singing what belongs to her, and to none else;  
    The day what belongs to the day—At night, the party of young fellows, robust, friendly,  
    Singing, with open mouths, their strong melodious songs.The speaker hears all of the following people singing except ___________?
    • A. 

      Mechanics and masons

    • B. 

      Carpenters and boatmen

    • C. 

      Shoemakers and mothers

    • D. 

      Bankers and teachers

  • 18. 
    Walt Whitman (1819–1892). I Hear America Singing
    I HEAR America singing, the varied carols I hear;  
    Those of mechanics—each one singing his, as it should be, blithe and strong;  
    The carpenter singing his, as he measures his plank or beam,  
    The mason singing his, as he makes ready for work, or leaves off work;  
    The boatman singing what belongs to him in his boat—the deckhand singing on the steamboat deck;          5
    The shoemaker singing as he sits on his bench—the hatter singing as he stands;  
    The wood-cutter’s song—the ploughboy’s, on his way in the morning, or at the noon intermission, or at sundown;  
    The delicious singing of the mother—or of the young wife at work—or of the girl sewing or washing—Each singing what belongs to her, and to none else;  
    The day what belongs to the day—At night, the party of young fellows, robust, friendly,  
    Singing, with open mouths, their strong melodious songs.What kind of peole does the speaker describe in this poem?
    • A. 

      Only men who work with their hands

    • B. 

      Laborers who do not get paid enough for their efforts

    • C. 

      Common working people

    • D. 

      Hard-working, well-educated people

  • 19. 
    Walt Whitman (1819–1892). I Hear America Singing
    I HEAR America singing, the varied carols I hear;  
    Those of mechanics—each one singing his, as it should be, blithe and strong;  
    The carpenter singing his, as he measures his plank or beam,  
    The mason singing his, as he makes ready for work, or leaves off work;  
    The boatman singing what belongs to him in his boat—the deckhand singing on the steamboat deck;          5
    The shoemaker singing as he sits on his bench—the hatter singing as he stands;  
    The wood-cutter’s song—the ploughboy’s, on his way in the morning, or at the noon intermission, or at sundown;  
    The delicious singing of the mother—or of the young wife at work—or of the girl sewing or washing—Each singing what belongs to her, and to none else;  
    The day what belongs to the day—At night, the party of young fellows, robust, friendly,  
    Singing, with open mouths, their strong melodious songs.What do you think Whitman didn't include powerful politicians or self-made millionaires?
    • A. 

      He wanted to celebrate everyday workers

    • B. 

      He did not know any of these people

    • C. 

      These people don't sing as they work

    • D. 

      He did not like these kinds of people

  • 20. 
    Walt Whitman (1819–1892). I Hear America Singing
    I HEAR America singing, the varied carols I hear;  
    Those of mechanics—each one singing his, as it should be, blithe and strong;  
    The carpenter singing his, as he measures his plank or beam,  
    The mason singing his, as he makes ready for work, or leaves off work;  
    The boatman singing what belongs to him in his boat—the deckhand singing on the steamboat deck;          5
    The shoemaker singing as he sits on his bench—the hatter singing as he stands;  
    The wood-cutter’s song—the ploughboy’s, on his way in the morning, or at the noon intermission, or at sundown;  
    The delicious singing of the mother—or of the young wife at work—or of the girl sewing or washing—Each singing what belongs to her, and to none else;  
    The day what belongs to the day—At night, the party of young fellows, robust, friendly,  
    Singing, with open mouths, their strong melodious songs.Why is each person "singing what belongs to him or her and to none else"?
    • A. 

      These are the only songs they know

    • B. 

      These are the songs they know best

    • C. 

      Each wants to sing louder than the others to drown them out

    • D. 

      A person's individuality is his or her work and song

  • 21. 
    Walt Whitman (1819–1892). I Hear America Singing
    I HEAR America singing, the varied carols I hear;  
    Those of mechanics—each one singing his, as it should be, blithe and strong;  
    The carpenter singing his, as he measures his plank or beam,  
    The mason singing his, as he makes ready for work, or leaves off work;  
    The boatman singing what belongs to him in his boat—the deckhand singing on the steamboat deck;          5
    The shoemaker singing as he sits on his bench—the hatter singing as he stands;  
    The wood-cutter’s song—the ploughboy’s, on his way in the morning, or at the noon intermission, or at sundown;  
    The delicious singing of the mother—or of the young wife at work—or of the girl sewing or washing—Each singing what belongs to her, and to none else;  
    The day what belongs to the day—At night, the party of young fellows, robust, friendly,  
    Singing, with open mouths, their strong melodious songs.Why is each person "singing what belongs to him or her and to none else"?
    • A. 

      These are the only songs they know

    • B. 

      These are the songs they know best

    • C. 

      Each wants to sing louder than the others to drown them out

    • D. 

      A person's individuality is his or her work and song

  • 22. 
    Walt Whitman (1819–1892). I Hear America Singing
    I HEAR America singing, the varied carols I hear;  
    Those of mechanics—each one singing his, as it should be, blithe and strong;  
    The carpenter singing his, as he measures his plank or beam,  
    The mason singing his, as he makes ready for work, or leaves off work;  
    The boatman singing what belongs to him in his boat—the deckhand singing on the steamboat deck;          5
    The shoemaker singing as he sits on his bench—the hatter singing as he stands;  
    The wood-cutter’s song—the ploughboy’s, on his way in the morning, or at the noon intermission, or at sundown;  
    The delicious singing of the mother—or of the young wife at work—or of the girl sewing or washing—Each singing what belongs to her, and to none else;  
    The day what belongs to the day—At night, the party of young fellows, robust, friendly,  
    Singing, with open mouths, their strong melodious songs.The tone of "I Hear America Singing" can best be described as
    • A. 

      Phony (fake)

    • B. 

      Joyous

    • C. 

      Depressed

    • D. 

      Quiet

  • 23. 
    Walt Whitman (1819–1892). I Hear America Singing
    I HEAR America singing, the varied carols I hear;  
    Those of mechanics—each one singing his, as it should be, blithe and strong;  
    The carpenter singing his, as he measures his plank or beam,  
    The mason singing his, as he makes ready for work, or leaves off work;  
    The boatman singing what belongs to him in his boat—the deckhand singing on the steamboat deck;          5
    The shoemaker singing as he sits on his bench—the hatter singing as he stands;  
    The wood-cutter’s song—the ploughboy’s, on his way in the morning, or at the noon intermission, or at sundown;  
    The delicious singing of the mother—or of the young wife at work—or of the girl sewing or washing—Each singing what belongs to her, and to none else;  
    The day what belongs to the day—At night, the party of young fellows, robust, friendly,  
    Singing, with open mouths, their strong melodious songs.In "I Hear America Singing," the singing represents the
    • A. 

      Pride and happiness working people feel

    • B. 

      Singing that some people do as they work

    • C. 

      Complaints that workers have about their difficult life

    • D. 

      Inabilit of managers to understand the common worker

  • 24. 
    Lines that are grouped together and separated in the poem by a space or spaces
    • A. 

      Stanza

    • B. 

      Verse

    • C. 

      Refrain

    • D. 

      Rhyme

  • 25. 
    The repetition of sounds in a poem
    • A. 

      Rhyme scheme

    • B. 

      Refrain

    • C. 

      Imagery

    • D. 

      Alliteration

    • E. 

      Assonance

  • 26. 
    A long narrative poem about the adventures of a hero whose actions reflect the ideals and values of a nation or a group
    • A. 

      Ode

    • B. 

      Sonnett

    • C. 

      Epic

    • D. 

      Free verse

    • E. 

      Limerick

  • 27. 
    A person, place, object, or action that stands for something beyond itself
    • A. 

      Oxymoron

    • B. 

      Imagery

    • C. 

      Alliteration

    • D. 

      Personification

    • E. 

      Symbol

  • 28. 
    The Bat - by Theodore RoethkeBy day the bat is cousin to the mouse.             1He likes the attic of an aging house.           His fingers make a hat about his head.His pulse beat is so slow we think him dead.He loops in crazy figures half the night               5Among the trees that face the corner light.But when he brushes up against a screen,We are afraid of what our eyes have seen:For soemthing is amiss or out of placeWhen mice with wings can wear a human face.  10What two animals are compared in this poem?
    • A. 

      Rat

    • B. 

      Bat

    • C. 

      Mouse

    • D. 

      Snake

    • E. 

      Bird

  • 29. 
    The Bat - by Theodore RoethkeBy day the bat is cousin to the mouse.               1He likes the attic of an aging house.           His fingers make a hat about his head.His pulse beat is so slow we think him dead.He loops in crazy figures half the night               5Among the trees that face the corner light.But when he brushes up against a screen,We are afraid of what our eyes have seen:For soemthing is amiss or out of placeWhen mice with wings can wear a human face.  10How many stanzas are in this poem?
    • A. 

      1

    • B. 

      2

    • C. 

      5

    • D. 

      10

    • E. 

      6

  • 30. 
    The Bat - by Theodore RoethkeBy day the bat is cousin to the mouse.               1He likes the attic of an aging house.           His fingers make a hat about his head.His pulse beat is so slow we think him dead.He loops in crazy figures half the night               5Among the trees that face the corner light.But when he brushes up against a screen,We are afraid of what our eyes have seen:For soemthing is amiss or out of placeWhen mice with wings can wear a human face.  10Which line from the poem uses personification?
    • A. 

      1

    • B. 

      5

    • C. 

      7

    • D. 

      3

    • E. 

      10

  • 31. 
    The Bat - by Theodore RoethkeBy day the bat is cousin to the mouse.              1He likes the attic of an aging house.           His fingers make a hat about his head.His pulse beat is so slow we think him dead.He loops in crazy figures half the night                5Among the trees that face the corner light.But when he brushes up against a screen,We are afraid of what our eyes have seen:For soemthing is amiss or out of placeWhen mice with wings can wear a human face.  10This poem is written in __________
    • A. 

      Couplets

    • B. 

      A hurry

    • C. 

      Quatriains

    • D. 

      Run ons

  • 32. 
    The Bat - by Theodore RoethkeBy day the bat is cousin to the mouse.              1He likes the attic of an aging house.           His fingers make a hat about his head.His pulse beat is so slow we think him dead.He loops in crazy figures half the night              5Among the trees that face the corner light.But when he brushes up against a screen,We are afraid of what our eyes have seen:For soemthing is amiss or out of placeWhen mice with wings can wear a human face.  10What is the rhyme scheme of this poem?
    • A. 

      ABABABABAB

    • B. 

      AABBCCDDEE

    • C. 

      ABCDEFGHIJ

    • D. 

      AB CD EE FF GH

    • E. 

      AAAABBBBCC

  • 33. 
    The bald eagle represents freedomThis es an example of:
    • A. 

      Hyperbole

    • B. 

      Alliteration

    • C. 

      Personification

    • D. 

      Symbolism

    • E. 

      Onomatopoeia

  • 34. 
    This test is a thousand pages long!This is an example of ...
    • A. 

      Alliteration

    • B. 

      Onomatopoeia

    • C. 

      Hyperbole

    • D. 

      Repetition

    • E. 

      Symbolism

  • 35. 
    Buzz! Whosh! Smack!These are examples of...
    • A. 

      Hyperbole

    • B. 

      Repetition

    • C. 

      Onomatopoeia

    • D. 

      Symbolism

  • 36. 
    The West WindIt's a warm wind, the west wind, full of birds' cries;I never hear the west wind but tears are in my eyes.For it comes from the west lands, the old brown hills,And April's in the west wind, and daffodils.It's a fine land, the west land, for hearts as tired as mine;Apple orchards blossom there, and the air's like wine.There is cool green grass there where men may lie at rest;And the thrushes are in song there, fluting in their nest...In the first line, what is the literary device used?
    • A. 

      Onomatopoeia

    • B. 

      Alliteration

    • C. 

      Rhyme

    • D. 

      Rhythm

  • 37. 
    The West WindIt's a warm wind, the west wind, full of birds' cries;I never hear the west wind but tears are in my eyes.For it comes from the west lands, the old brown hills,And April's in the west wind, and daffodils.It's a fine land, the west land, for hearts as tired as mine;Apple orchards blossom there, and the air's like wine.There is cool green grass there where men may lie at rest;And the thrushes are in song there, fluting in their nest...In the last line, which word is an example of onomatopoeia?
    • A. 

      Thrushes

    • B. 

      Song

    • C. 

      Fluting

    • D. 

      Nest

  • 38. 
    The West WindIt's a warm wind, the west wind, full of birds' cries;I never hear the west wind but tears are in my eyes.For it comes from the west lands, the old brown hills,And April's in the west wind, and daffodils.It's a fine land, the west land, for hearts as tired as mine;Apple orchards blossom there, and the air's like wine.There is cool green grass there where men may lie at rest;And the thrushes are in song there, fluting in their nest...Line six has a comparison. ____ is being compared to ___.
    • A. 

      Song to a nest

    • B. 

      Air to wine

    • C. 

      Air to song

    • D. 

      Blossoms to air

  • 39. 
    The West WindIt's a warm wind, the west wind, full of birds' cries;I never hear the west wind but tears are in my eyes.For it comes from the west lands, the old brown hills,And April's in the west wind, and daffodils.It's a fine land, the west land, for hearts as tired as mine;Apple orchards blossom there, and the air's like wine.There is cool green grass there where men may lie at rest;And the thrushes are in song there, fluting in their nest...Is the compairson in line six a simile or mtapnhor?
    • A. 

      Simile

    • B. 

      Metaphor

  • 40. 
    The West WindIt's a warm wind, the west wind, full of birds' cries;I never hear the west wind but tears are in my eyes.For it comes from the west lands, the old brown hills,And April's in the west wind, and daffodils.It's a fine land, the west land, for hearts as tired as mine;Apple orchards blossom there, and the air's like wine.There is cool green grass there where men may lie at rest;And the thrushes are in song there, fluting in their nest...What kind of poem is this?
    • A. 

      Free verse poem

    • B. 

      Limerick

    • C. 

      Narrative

    • D. 

      Lyric

  • 41. 
    The West WindIt's a warm wind, the west wind, full of birds' cries;I never hear the west wind but tears are in my eyes.For it comes from the west lands, the old brown hills,And April's in the west wind, and daffodils.It's a fine land, the west land, for hearts as tired as mine;Apple orchards blossom there, and the air's like wine.There is cool green grass there where men may lie at rest;And the thrushes are in song there, fluting in their nest...The sense of __________________ and the sense of ____________ are appealed to in the first line.
    • A. 

      Sight and taste

    • B. 

      Touch and sight

    • C. 

      Touch and sound

    • D. 

      Sound and smell

  • 42. 
    The kind of description which appeals to one or more of the five senses is called...
    • A. 

      Simile

    • B. 

      Allusion

    • C. 

      Imagery

    • D. 

      Metaphor

    • E. 

      Onomatopoeia

  • 43. 
    Romeo and Juliet - by William ShakespeareTwo households, both alike in dignity,In fair Verona, where we lay our scene,From ancient grudge break to new mutiny,Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean.From forth the fatal loins of these two foesA pair of star-cross'd lovers take their life;Whose misadventured piteous overthrowsDo with their death bury their parents' strife.The fearful passage of their death-mark'd love,And the continuance of their parents' rage,Which but their children's end, naught could remove,Is now the two hours' traffic of our stage;The which if you with patient ears attend, What here shall miss, our toil shall strive to mend. What type of poem is this?
    • A. 

      Limerick

    • B. 

      Sonnett

    • C. 

      Epic

    • D. 

      Free verse