Practice Quiz: Phlebotomy Chapter 3 - Part II

Approved & Edited by ProProfs Editorial Team
The editorial team at ProProfs Quizzes consists of a select group of subject experts, trivia writers, and quiz masters who have authored over 10,000 quizzes taken by more than 100 million users. This team includes our in-house seasoned quiz moderators and subject matter experts. Our editorial experts, spread across the world, are rigorously trained using our comprehensive guidelines to ensure that you receive the highest quality quizzes.
Learn about Our Editorial Process
| By Laura Grimm
L
Laura Grimm
Community Contributor
Quizzes Created: 3 | Total Attempts: 2,482
Questions: 19 | Attempts: 1,160

SettingsSettingsSettings
Practice Quiz: Phlebotomy Chapter 3 - Part II - Quiz

As promised this is part II of the practice quiz for the phlebotomy chapter. A continuous review of chapters as you cover them is perfect to keep your knowledge fresh. Being that this is a continuation to the series of quizzes, do ensure you keep an eye out the quiz that helps you review chapter 4 and the others. All the best!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    What is the name for developing cells and makeup of 1% of the red blood cells in the circulatory system?

    Explanation
    Reticulocytes are developing cells that make up about 1% of the red blood cells in the circulatory system. They are immature red blood cells that still contain remnants of ribosomes, giving them a reticular or net-like appearance when stained. Reticulocytes are released from the bone marrow into the bloodstream and eventually mature into fully functional red blood cells. The presence of reticulocytes in the blood can indicate the rate of red blood cell production and can be used as a marker for certain medical conditions.

    Rate this question:

  • 2. 

    What is the life span of red blood cells?

    Explanation
    Red blood cells (RBCs) are essential components of the blood responsible for carrying oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body tissues and transporting carbon dioxide from the tissues back to the lungs for exhalation. The lifespan of RBCs varies slightly among individuals but is typically around 120 days. As RBCs age, they undergo changes that affect their flexibility and ability to function effectively. Eventually, they become rigid and less efficient at carrying oxygen, prompting the body to remove them from circulation. The spleen and liver play crucial roles in this process by recognizing and engulfing aging or damaged RBCs. Once engulfed, the components of the RBCs are broken down and recycled. Hemoglobin, the protein responsible for carrying oxygen in RBCs, is broken down into heme and globin. Iron from heme is recycled to produce new RBCs or stored for future use, while the remaining components are further broken down and eliminated as waste. The continuous production and removal of RBCs maintain the balance of oxygen transport in the body. If the lifespan of RBCs is shortened or their production is insufficient, it can lead to various health conditions, such as anemia or hemolytic disorders.

    Rate this question:

  • 3. 

    An iron-containing pigment which gives red blood cells their color and able to bind oxygen...

    Explanation
    Hemoglobin is an iron-containing pigment found in red blood cells that gives them their characteristic red color. It is responsible for binding and transporting oxygen from the lungs to the body's tissues. Hemoglobin plays a crucial role in the oxygenation of tissues and is essential for maintaining normal bodily functions.

    Rate this question:

  • 4. 

    What are the 4 chambers of the heart?

    Explanation
    The heart is divided into four chambers: two upper chambers called atria and two lower chambers called ventricles. The atria receive blood from the veins and pump it into the ventricles. The ventricles then pump the blood out of the heart to the rest of the body. This division of chambers allows for efficient circulation of oxygenated and deoxygenated blood throughout the body.

    Rate this question:

  • 5. 

    Collects blood returning to the heart...

    Explanation
    The atria are the upper chambers of the heart that collect blood returning to the heart. They receive blood from the veins and then contract to pump the blood into the ventricles.

    Rate this question:

  • 6. 

    Propels it forward to lower chambers...

    Explanation
    The ventricles are the lower chambers of the heart that receive blood from the atria and pump it out to the rest of the body. They are responsible for propelling the blood forward and ensuring a continuous flow throughout the circulatory system.

    Rate this question:

  • 7. 

    Valves in veins, Gravity, and ___________ can influence blood pressure at different places of the body.

    Explanation
    The contraction of skeletal muscles plays a significant role in pumping blood through the veins. When muscles contract, they squeeze the veins, pushing the blood forward and preventing it from flowing backward. This pumping action helps to maintain blood pressure and ensure that blood is efficiently circulated throughout the body.

    Rate this question:

  • 8. 

    The last small branches of the arterial system and can dilate and contract depending on how much oxygen the tissue needs.

    Explanation
    Arterioles are the last small branches of the arterial system and play a crucial role in regulating blood flow to different tissues. They have the ability to dilate and contract, which allows them to control the amount of oxygen and nutrients delivered to the tissues based on their needs. When the tissue requires more oxygen, the arterioles dilate to increase blood flow, and when the tissue needs less oxygen, they contract to reduce blood flow. This dynamic regulation ensures that each tissue receives an adequate blood supply and maintains homeostasis.

    Rate this question:

  • 9. 

    Blood needs to remain in the vessels, and pathogens must be kept out of the system, what is the chemical reaction that takes place near sites of vascular injury to protect vessel walls?

    Explanation
    Coagulation is the chemical reaction that takes place near sites of vascular injury to protect vessel walls. When blood vessels are damaged, the body initiates a series of reactions that lead to the formation of a blood clot. This clot, made up of platelets and fibrin, helps to seal the injured area and prevent further blood loss. Coagulation is a crucial process in maintaining the integrity of the vascular system and preventing infections from entering the bloodstream.

    Rate this question:

  • 10. 

    Coagulation is also referred to as... 

    Explanation
    Coagulation is the process by which blood forms a clot to stop bleeding. It involves a series of complex reactions that result in the formation of a fibrin clot. This clotting mechanism is crucial for preventing excessive blood loss and promoting wound healing. Therefore, coagulation and blood clotting are synonymous terms used to describe this essential physiological process.

    Rate this question:

  • 11. 

    Hematoma is... 

    Explanation
    A hematoma refers to a collection or pool of blood that accumulates in the tissue surrounding a blood vessel. This usually occurs as a result of trauma or injury, causing blood to leak from the vessel and accumulate in the surrounding area. Hematomas can vary in size and severity, and may cause pain, swelling, and discoloration of the skin. Treatment for a hematoma typically involves applying ice to reduce swelling, elevating the affected area, and allowing time for the body to reabsorb the pooled blood. In some cases, medical intervention may be necessary to drain the hematoma.

    Rate this question:

  • 12. 

    Removable of old and defective cells takes place in the plasma membrane and at the same rate as the production of cells

    Explanation
    Eryptosis is the process of programmed cell death or apoptosis, specifically in red blood cells. It involves the removal of old and defective cells from the plasma membrane. The statement suggests that this process occurs at the same rate as the production of new cells, indicating a balance between cell production and removal.

    Rate this question:

  • 13. 

    What are the three main types of tissues of the heart, which form 3 layers?

    Explanation
    The heart is composed of three main types of tissues that form three layers. The outer layer is called the epicardium, which is a protective layer that covers the surface of the heart. The middle layer is known as the myocardium, which is the thickest layer and consists of cardiac muscle fibers responsible for the contraction of the heart. The inner layer is called the endocardium, which is a smooth lining that covers the chambers and valves of the heart. These three layers work together to ensure the proper functioning of the heart.

    Rate this question:

  • 14. 

    ________ is vital in fight or flight scenarios; this is how the body responds to stress.

    Explanation
    Adrenaline, or epinephrine, is pivotal in the body's "fight or flight" response to stress. When the brain perceives danger, the adrenal glands release adrenaline into the bloodstream, rapidly triggering physiological changes. These include increased heart rate, dilated airways, elevated blood pressure, and heightened alertness. These effects prepare the body for immediate action, enabling individuals to either confront the threat or flee from it, essential for survival in challenging situations.

    Rate this question:

  • 15. 

    Another critical hormone secreted by the pituitary is the ________

    Explanation
    The correct answer is "Thyroid-stimulating hormone." The pituitary gland secretes various hormones, and one of them is the thyroid-stimulating hormone. This hormone plays a crucial role in regulating the function of the thyroid gland. It stimulates the production and release of thyroid hormones, which are essential for maintaining metabolism, growth, and development in the body. Therefore, the thyroid-stimulating hormone is an important hormone secreted by the pituitary gland.

    Rate this question:

  • 16. 

    Arteries carry oxygenated blood away from the heart with the exception _________ and _______

    Explanation
    Arteries are blood vessels that carry oxygenated blood away from the heart. However, there are two exceptions to this rule - the pulmonary artery and the umbilical artery. The pulmonary artery carries deoxygenated blood from the heart to the lungs for oxygenation, while the umbilical artery carries deoxygenated blood from the fetus to the placenta for oxygenation during fetal development. These two arteries function differently from other arteries in the body, making them the exceptions in carrying oxygenated blood away from the heart.

    Rate this question:

  • 17. 

    Main arteries are...

    Explanation
    The main arteries mentioned in the answer are the ascending aorta, arch of aorta, internal carotid artery, and subclavian artery. The ascending aorta is responsible for carrying oxygenated blood from the heart to the rest of the body. The arch of the aorta is a curved section that branches off into several major arteries, including the internal carotid artery and the subclavian artery. The internal carotid artery supplies blood to the brain, while the subclavian artery supplies blood to the arms and upper body.

    Rate this question:

  • 18. 

    Blood vessels can also be grouped into _________ and _________.

    Explanation
    Blood vessels can be classified into two main types: arterial vessels and venous vessels. Arterial vessels carry oxygenated blood away from the heart to various parts of the body, while venous vessels transport deoxygenated blood back to the heart. This classification is based on the direction of blood flow and the type of blood they carry. Arterial vessels have thicker walls and higher pressure compared to venous vessels, which have thinner walls and lower pressure. Understanding this classification helps in studying the circulatory system and the role of different blood vessels in maintaining proper blood flow throughout the body.

    Rate this question:

  • 19. 

    Pulmonary veins are... 

    Explanation
    The pulmonary veins are responsible for carrying oxygenated blood from the lungs back to the heart. There are four main pulmonary veins in the body: the right superior pulmonary vein, left superior pulmonary vein, right inferior pulmonary vein, and left inferior pulmonary vein. These veins play a crucial role in the circulation of oxygen-rich blood throughout the body.

    Rate this question:

Quiz Review Timeline +

Our quizzes are rigorously reviewed, monitored and continuously updated by our expert board to maintain accuracy, relevance, and timeliness.

  • Current Version
  • Feb 15, 2024
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team
  • Dec 29, 2015
    Quiz Created by
    Laura Grimm
Back to Top Back to top
Advertisement
×

Wait!
Here's an interesting quiz for you.

We have other quizzes matching your interest.