Peripheral Intravenous Catheter Insertion, Part I

5 Questions | Total Attempts: 72

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Peripheral Intravenous Catheter Insertion, Part I

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Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Describe the rationale for intravenous (IV) therapy (select all that apply). 
    • A. 

      All hospitalized patients need IV therapy for quick venous access.

    • B. 

      IV access provides the quickest route for medication administration.

    • C. 

      IV access is necessary for vital signs to be taken.

    • D. 

      IV access is necessary for transfusion of blood or blood components

    • E. 

      IV access is used to transfuse IV fluids.

    • F. 

      IV access may be used for nutritional support (TPN).

    • G. 

      IV access may be used for assessment of blood gases.

  • 2. 
    All of the following are common veins used for peripheral IV catheterization, EXCEPT:
    • A. 

      Cephalic vein.

    • B. 

      Median antecubital vein.

    • C. 

      Brachial vein.

    • D. 

      Internal jugular vein.

    • E. 

      Basilic vein.

  • 3. 
    When selecting a site for IV catheterization, one should AVOID (select all that apply):
    • A. 

      Previously used or sclerotic veins.

    • B. 

      Veins of the hand.

    • C. 

      Sites with infection, infiltration, thrombosis.

    • D. 

      Veins at the antecubital fossa.

    • E. 

      Veins in the arm of an arteriovenous fistula.

    • F. 

      Veins in the arm of an axillary dissection (commonly seen with a mastectomy).

  • 4. 
    When palpating a vein to be used for IV catheter insertion, it should feel:
    • A. 

      Tortuous, full, and ropy.

    • B. 

      Hard, full, and bumpy.

    • C. 

      Flexible, full, and bouncy.

    • D. 

      Rigid, flat, and stringy.

  • 5. 
    In order to successfully find a vein for peripheral IV catheterization, one only need to inspect the area visually. 
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False