Opportunity For Success: Clauses

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Clause Quizzes & Trivia

Make sure that you log in with your name. Earn at least a 90%, print out the certificate, and bring it to class by the due date. If you do all this: you will get extra credit on your quiz! Remember A clause is a group of related words with a subject and verb.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Usually noun clauses begin with that, what, where, when, who, whom, which, whose, how, why, whether, etc. Noun clauses perform the same functions in sentences that nouns do: A noun clause can be the subject of a sentence: What Billy did shocked his friends. A noun clause can be an object of a verb: Billy’s friends didn’t know that he couldn’t swim. (This answers the question "What didn't they know?") A noun clause can be a subject complement: Billy’s mistake was that he refused to take lessons.(This answers the question "What was his mistake?") A noun clause can be an object of a preposition: Mary is not responsible for what Billy did. (This answers the question "For what  is Mary not responsible?") A noun clause (but not a noun) can be an adjective complement: Everybody is sad that Billy drowned. (This answers the question "Why is everybody sad?") FIND THE NOUN CLAUSE IN THE FOLLOWING SENTENCE: Anyone who says that English teachers are boring will be punished.
    • A. 

      Anyone

    • B. 

      Anyone who says

    • C. 

      Anyone who says that English teachers are boring

    • D. 

      English teachers

  • 2. 
    FIND THE NOUN CLAUSE IN THE FOLLOWING SENTENCE: What I had for breakfast gave me heartburn.
    • A. 

      What I had for breakfast

    • B. 

      Breakfast

    • C. 

      Gave me heartburn

    • D. 

      Heartburn

  • 3. 
    FIND THE NOUN CLAUSE IN THE FOLLOWING SENTENCE: I must decide which type of cookie to eat.
    • A. 

      I

    • B. 

      I must decide

    • C. 

      Which type of cookie to eat

    • D. 

      Cookie

  • 4. 
    TYPE THE NOUN CLAUSE IN THE FOLLOWING SENTENCE: Why she kept crying puzzled everyone.
  • 5. 
    Adjective clauses perform the same function in sentences that adjectives do: they modify nouns. The teacher has a car. (Car is a noun.) It’s a new car. (New is an adjective which modifies car.) The car that she is driving is not hers. (That she is driving is an adjective clause which modifies car. It’s a clause because it has a subject (she) and a verb (is driving); it’s an adjective clause because it modifies a noun.) Note that adjectives usually precede the nouns they modify; adjective clauses always follow the nouns they modify. There are only five dependent signals which introduce adjective clauses: Who, Whom, Whose, Which, That However, sometimes the signal word is missing: The book I borrowed was full of famous quotes. The book [that] I borrowed was full of famous quotes. Sometimes the dependent signal [usually "that"] is implied. Mentally insert it, and the sentence will be easier to analyze. FIND THE ADJECTIVE CLAUSE IN THE FOLLOWING SENTENCE:  Do you know the woman who is wearing a blue suit?
    • A. 

      You know the woman

    • B. 

      The woman

    • C. 

      Woman who is wearing

    • D. 

      Who is wearing the blue suit

  • 6. 
    FIND THE ADJECTIVE CLAUSE IN THE FOLLOWING SENTENCE: The books that people read were mainly religious.
    • A. 

      The books

    • B. 

      That people read

    • C. 

      Were mainly

    • D. 

      Mainly religious

  • 7. 
    FIND THE ADJECTIVE CLAUSE IN THE FOLLOWING SENTENCE: Some firefighters never meet the people they save.
    • A. 

      Some firefighters

    • B. 

      Never meet

    • C. 

      The people

    • D. 

      They save

  • 8. 
    TYPE THE ADJECTIVE CLAUSE IN THE FOLLOWING SENTENCE: The boy who sits near me is my brother's best friend.
  • 9. 
    There are many types of adverb clauses. Here are some examples of the most common types:
    1. It answers the question, “Where?
    Wherever there are computers, there is Microsoft software.
    1. It answers the question, “When?
    After the fruit is harvested, it is sold at the market.
    1. It answers the question, “Why?” or “What caused this?”  
    I didn't call her because I'm shy.
    1. It answers the question, “Why?” or “What was the reason for doing this?
    She took a computer course so that she could get a better job.
    1. It answers the question, “Why is this unexpected?
    Although Jay has a Master's degree, he works as a store clerk.
    1. It answers the question, “Under what conditions?
    If you save your money, you will be able to go to college. As you can see from the examples above, most adverb clauses can be recognized because they are introduced by a particular word or phrase. These words and phrases are called subordinating conjunctions, and there are many of them, including these: after, before, until, while, because, since, as, so that, in order that, if, unless, whether, though, although, even though, where   FIND THE ADVERB CLAUSE IN THE FOLLOWING SENTENCE: The premier gave a speech where the workers were striking.
    • A. 

      The premier

    • B. 

      Gave a speech

    • C. 

      Where the workers were striking

    • D. 

      Were striking

  • 10. 
    FIND THE ADVERB CLAUSE IN THE FOLLOWING SENTENCE: She visited many friends when she was in Miami.
    • A. 

      She visited

    • B. 

      Many friends

    • C. 

      When she was in Miami

    • D. 

      In Miami

  • 11. 
    FIND THE ADVERB CLAUSE IN THE FOLLOWING SENTENCE: Now that he has a lot of money, he can afford a new computer.
    • A. 

      Now that

    • B. 

      Now that he has a lot of money

    • C. 

      He can afford

    • D. 

      A new computer

  • 12. 
    TYPE THE ADVERB CLAUSE IN THE FOLLOWING SENTENCE: After she comes, she will turn on the radio.
  • 13. 
    If a clause can stand alone as a sentence, it is an independent clause.   WHICH OF THE FOLLOWING IS AN INDEPENDENT CLAUSE?
    • A. 

      I despise individuals of low character

    • B. 

      When the saints go marching in

    • C. 

      Lou Smith, uglier than a rabid raccoon

    • D. 

      Because she smiled at him

  • 14. 
    WHICH OF THE FOLLOWING IS AN INDEPENDENT CLAUSE?
    • A. 

      Although I never heard her beautiful singing voice

    • B. 

      He sang

    • C. 

      Chiming, chirping, and clanging merrily

    • D. 

      Where I sat

  • 15. 
    WHICH OF THE FOLLOWING HAS TWO INDEPENDENT CLAUSES PUNCTUATED CORRECTLY?
    • A. 

      The birds and sheep coexisted peacefully while the coyote planned his attack.

    • B. 

      The birds flew and the sheep ate.

    • C. 

      I was shocked to see the carnage in the morning, but my father was not surprised.