Cerebrospinal Fluid MCQ Quiz Questions And Answers

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Cerebrospinal Fluid MCQ Quiz Questions And Answers - Quiz

Check out the Cerebrospinal Fluid MCQ quiz questions and answers designed for the students for the study of neuroanatomy. Let us see how well you understand these cerebrospinal fluid MCQ quiz questions and answers. It's about the basics of the structure of the system, which produces cerebrospinal fluid. So, are you fully ready and prepared to take this quiz? Try to get a good score as you take this quiz. Best of luck to you!


Cerebrospinal Fluid Questions and Answers

  • 1. 

    The main cell type that produces CSF is the

    • A.

      Astrocyte

    • B.

      Basket Cell

    • C.

      Ependymal Cell

    • D.

      Purkinje Cell

    • E.

      Schwann Cell

    Correct Answer
    C. Ependymal Cell
    Explanation
    Ependymal cells are the main cell type that produces cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). These cells line the ventricles of the brain and the central canal of the spinal cord. They have cilia on their surface that help to circulate the CSF. Ependymal cells are responsible for the production and regulation of CSF, which is essential for the protection and nourishment of the central nervous system. Astrocytes are supportive cells, basket cells are inhibitory interneurons in the cerebellum, Purkinje cells are large neurons in the cerebellum, and Schwann cells are responsible for myelination in the peripheral nervous system.

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  • 2. 

    The main anatomical structure which produces CSF is called the

    • A.

      Amygdala

    • B.

      Cerebral Cortex

    • C.

      Cerebellum

    • D.

      Choroid Plexus

    • E.

      Foramen of Monroe

    Correct Answer
    D. Choroid Plexus
    Explanation
    The choroid plexus is the main anatomical structure that produces cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). It is located in the ventricles of the brain and consists of a network of blood vessels covered by specialized cells called ependymal cells. These cells actively transport substances from the blood into the CSF, creating the fluid that surrounds and protects the brain and spinal cord. The other options listed (Amygdala, Cerebral Cortex, Cerebellum, and Foramen of Monroe) are not directly involved in the production of CSF.

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  • 3. 

    The main compartments which hold CSF in the brain are called

    • A.

      Arteries Cavities

    • B.

      Chambers

    • C.

      Jim

    • D.

      Ventricles

    • E.

      Viaducts

    Correct Answer
    D. Ventricles
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "Ventricles". The ventricles are the main compartments in the brain that hold cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). CSF plays a crucial role in protecting and nourishing the brain, and it is produced in the ventricles. There are four ventricles in the brain: two lateral ventricles, the third ventricle, and the fourth ventricle. These ventricles are interconnected and help in the circulation and distribution of CSF throughout the brain and spinal cord.

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  • 4. 

    How many ventricles are there?

    • A.

      2

    • B.

      4

    • C.

      7

    • D.

      9

    • E.

      32

    Correct Answer
    B. 4
    Explanation
    There are four ventricles in the human brain. The ventricles are interconnected cavities filled with cerebrospinal fluid that help cushion and protect the brain. They are named as the two lateral ventricles, the third ventricle, and the fourth ventricle. These ventricles play a crucial role in the circulation, production, and absorption of cerebrospinal fluid, which helps maintain the brain's environment and provides nutrients to the nervous system.

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  • 5. 

    What is the more common name for 'ventricles 1+2'?

    • A.

      Anterior ventricles

    • B.

      Lateral ventricles

    • C.

      Primary ventricles

    • D.

      Posterior ventricles

    • E.

      Vertical ventricles

    Correct Answer
    B. Lateral ventricles
    Explanation
    The more common name for 'ventricles 1+2' is lateral ventricles.

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  • 6. 

    The lateral ventricles are connected to the third ventricle via

    • A.

      Cerebral Aqueduct (of Sylvius)

    • B.

      Ependymal Canal

    • C.

      Medial Aperture (Foramen of Magendie)

    • D.

      Interventrricular foramina (of Monro)

    • E.

      Telephone

    Correct Answer
    D. Interventrricular foramina (of Monro)
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Interventricular foramina (of Monro). The lateral ventricles, located in the cerebral hemispheres, are connected to the third ventricle in the middle of the brain through these small openings called the interventricular foramina. These foramina allow the flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) between the lateral ventricles and the third ventricle, facilitating communication and exchange of fluids within the brain.

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  • 7. 

    The third ventricle is connected to the fourth ventricle via the

    • A.

      Cerebral Aqueduct (of Sylvius)

    • B.

      Ependymal Canal

    • C.

      Lateral Aperture (Foramen of Luschka)

    • D.

      Medial Aperture (Foramen of Magendie)

    • E.

      Internet

    Correct Answer
    A. Cerebral Aqueduct (of Sylvius)
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Cerebral Aqueduct (of Sylvius). The third ventricle, which is located in the midline of the brain, is connected to the fourth ventricle, which is located in the brainstem, through a narrow channel called the cerebral aqueduct. This aqueduct allows for the flow of cerebrospinal fluid between the two ventricles. The ependymal canal is not a structure that connects the third and fourth ventricles. The lateral and medial apertures, also known as the foramen of Luschka and the foramen of Magendie, respectively, are openings in the fourth ventricle that allow cerebrospinal fluid to exit and circulate around the brain and spinal cord. The internet is not a structure involved in the connection between the ventricles.

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  • 8. 

    The Lateral and Medial Apertures drain the fourth ventricle into the

    • A.

      Arachnoid granulations

    • B.

      Cerebellum

    • C.

      Ependymal Canal

    • D.

      Fifth ventricle

    • E.

      Subarachnoid space

    Correct Answer
    E. Subarachnoid space
    Explanation
    The Lateral and Medial Apertures are openings located in the fourth ventricle of the brain. These apertures allow cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to flow out of the ventricle and into the subarachnoid space. The subarachnoid space is a fluid-filled area between the arachnoid mater and pia mater, two of the layers that surround the brain and spinal cord. CSF circulates in the subarachnoid space, providing cushioning and nourishment to the brain and spinal cord. Therefore, the correct answer is the subarachnoid space, as it is where the fourth ventricle drains into.

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  • 9. 

    The greatest volume of CSF is contained within the

    • A.

      Lateral ventricles

    • B.

      Third ventricle

    • C.

      Fourth ventricle

    • D.

      Subarachnoid space

    Correct Answer
    D. Subarachnoid space
    Explanation
    The ventricles only contain ~25ml of the ~200ml in the average human nervous system.

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  • 10. 

    The subarachnoid space is between the arachnoid mater and the

    • A.

      Alma mater

    • B.

      Dura mater

    • C.

      Pia mater

    • D.

      Both A & B

    Correct Answer
    C. Pia mater
    Explanation
    The subarachnoid space is a fluid-filled space located between the arachnoid mater and the pia mater. The pia mater is the innermost layer of the meninges, which is a protective covering of the brain and spinal cord. The arachnoid mater is the middle layer of the meninges. Therefore, the correct answer is Pia mater.

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  • 11. 

    CSF is resorbed by the

    • A.

      Arachnoid granulations

    • B.

      Con granulations

    • C.

      Dura granulations

    • D.

      Pia granulations

    Correct Answer
    A. Arachnoid granulations
    Explanation
    Arachnoid granulations are responsible for the resorption of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). These granulations are small protrusions of the arachnoid mater, a membrane that covers the brain and spinal cord. They project into the venous sinuses of the brain, allowing CSF to be absorbed into the bloodstream. This process helps to maintain the balance of CSF in the brain and spinal cord, preventing the buildup of excess fluid and maintaining normal intracranial pressure.

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Stephanie Baumhover |Medical Education Director |
Medical Expert
Stephanie is a seasoned Medical Education Director, boasting a comprehensive background in Critical Care, Oncology, Pediatrics, and Managed Care. She holds a PharmD from Creighton University and completed her PGY1 Residency in Critical Care and Transplant at the University of Virginia. Currently, she excels in her role at Medscape. With her extensive medical education background, she plays a pivotal role in ensuring the accuracy and relevance of our medical quizzes. Her dedication to maintaining high standards contributes significantly to the platform's success.

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  • Current Version
  • Mar 12, 2024
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team

    Expert Reviewed by
    Stephanie Baumhover
  • Feb 04, 2012
    Quiz Created by
    Phil_newton
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