Neurology Clinical Correlates

15 Questions | Total Attempts: 306

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Neurology Quizzes & Trivia

Test your knowledge of neurology clinical correlates!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    You are looking at the autopsied brain of a person who suffered from Alzheimer's Disease. Which of the following structural changes would best confirm his or her diagnosis?
    • A. 

      Cortical atrophy

    • B. 

      Lack of a blood-brain barrier

    • C. 

      Enlarged ventricles

    • D. 

      Degeneration of the hippocampus

    • E. 

      A, C, & D

  • 2. 
    You meet a new client and learn that she has cerebral palsy. Before you even read her chart, you know that she will either have occulta, meningocele, or myelomeningocele.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 3. 
    You just met a client who herniated a disk after moving heavy boxes at work. What can you tell him about his prognosis?
    • A. 

      He should expect ipsilateral paralysis and contralateral somatosensory loss

    • B. 

      He will need surgery, but luckily herniated disks usually resolve within six weeks post-surgery

    • C. 

      He should expect bilateral paralysis and ipsilateral somatosensory loss

    • D. 

      There will likely be no need for surgery. The injury usually resolves itself within six weeks

  • 4. 
    Which of the following best describes Dementia?
    • A. 

      A disorder seen in chronic alcoholism and severe malnutrition causing damage to the mammillary bodies

    • B. 

      An age-related, progressive, irreversible brain disorder

    • C. 

      A non-specific illness syndrome in which areas of cognition are impaired

    • D. 

      The loss of long-term memory

    • E. 

      None of the above

  • 5. 
    After a car accident, one of your clients has Brown-Sequard syndrome, which means that he has suffered a hemisection of his spinal cord. What would you expect to see in terms of his somatosensory functioning?
    • A. 

      Contralateral loss of pain and temperature sensation

    • B. 

      Ipsilateral paralysis

    • C. 

      Ipsilateral loss of proprioception and discriminative touch

    • D. 

      All of the above

  • 6. 
    If a client complained of dark or blurred central vision, what would you first suspect he or she might have?
    • A. 

      Bilateral hemianopia

    • B. 

      Macular degeneration

    • C. 

      A spinal cord injury

    • D. 

      Acoustic neuroma

  • 7. 
    Your client complains that although she has no visual impairments, she is unable to recognize familiar faces. You conclude that she must have alexia, a type of agnosia. 
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 8. 
    Spinal polio attacks which of the following neuroanatomical structures?
    • A. 

      Basal ganglia

    • B. 

      Upper motor neuron bodies

    • C. 

      Brachial plexus

    • D. 

      Lower motor neuron bodies

  • 9. 
    Your client's wife is confused about what caused her husband's Alzheimer's and what is happening inside his brain. You tell her that while the cause of Alzheimer's is unknown, you can tell her a little about what neural mechanisms are at work during the course of the disease. Which of the following might you mention?
    • A. 

      Neurofibrillary tangles caused by abnormal tau (a protein) in the neurons

    • B. 

      Degeneration of dopamine-producing cells in the substantia nigra (part of the basal ganglia)

    • C. 

      Neuritic plaques caused by extracellular deposits of amyloid (a fibrous protein) between neurons

    • D. 

      Injury to the optic chiasm (the intersection of two hemiretinas)

    • E. 

      Both A & C

  • 10. 
    What is the etiology of Multiple Sclerosis?
    • A. 

      Birth injury

    • B. 

      Autoimmune

    • C. 

      Virus

    • D. 

      Amnesia

    • E. 

      Unknown

  • 11. 
    One of your clients, an eight-year old boy, has Duchenne's Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Which of the following symptoms would he be most likely to demonstrate?
    • A. 

      Enlarged calf muscles

    • B. 

      Ptosis

    • C. 

      Gower's sign

    • D. 

      Pounding headache

    • E. 

      Both A & C

  • 12. 
    You ask your client to use a carrot scraper to peel a carrot. Instead, she appears to try to cut the carrot scraper with the carrot. What diagnosis might you suspect she has?
    • A. 

      Ideomotor limb apraxia

    • B. 

      Conceptual limb apraxia

    • C. 

      Ideational limb apraxia

    • D. 

      Dressing apraxia

  • 13. 
    A person with hydrocephalus suffers from blocked circulation of cerebrospinal fluid. Fortunately, this condition can sometimes be alleviated by the insertion of a shunt.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 14. 
    Which of the following symptoms are most commonly associated with an upper motor neuron lesion?
    • A. 

      Hyporeflexia

    • B. 

      Hyperreflexia

    • C. 

      Adductor spasms

    • D. 

      Flu-like symptoms

  • 15. 
    Your client has trouble with a complex perceptual function called figure ground discrimination. Which of the following activities might she have the most trouble with?
    • A. 

      Moving through her living room without bumping into the coffee table

    • B. 

      Discriminating between the left and right sides of her body

    • C. 

      Picking out a black pen from a drawer full of other pens

    • D. 

      Remembering the route from her house to her daughter's school

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