Navy Dep Vocabulary Quiz

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Navy Quizzes & Trivia

See how well you know Navy lingo. . .


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    A unit of length equal to 6 feet used for measuring the depth of water:

    • A.

      Cast off

    • B.

      Fathom

    • C.

      Geedunk

    • D.

      Passageway

    • E.

      Deep six

    Correct Answer
    B. Fathom
    Explanation
    A fathom is a unit of length commonly used to measure the depth of water. It is equal to 6 feet or approximately 1.8 meters. In nautical terms, sailors use fathoms to determine the depth of water for navigation and to ensure that the water is deep enough for their vessels to safely pass through. Therefore, the correct answer for this question is fathom.

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  • 2. 

    Candy, gum or cafeteria:

    • A.

      Tattoo

    • B.

      Scuttlebutt

    • C.

      Secure

    • D.

      Rating

    • E.

      Geedunk

    Correct Answer
    E. Geedunk
    Explanation
    Among the given words, "geedunk" is the only word that is related to candy, gum, or cafeteria. Geedunk is a slang term used in the military to refer to a small store or vending machine that sells snacks and drinks. It is commonly found in cafeterias or recreational areas, where candy and gum are often sold alongside other snacks. Therefore, geedunk is the most appropriate word in the given context.

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  • 3. 

    Officer responsible to the XO for the deck department/division aboard ship, or the command maintenance:

    • A.

      First lieutenant

    • B.

      Carry on

    • C.

      Scuttlebutt

    • D.

      Lifeline

    • E.

      Scullery

    Correct Answer
    A. First lieutenant
    Explanation
    The first lieutenant is the officer responsible for the deck department/division aboard a ship or the command maintenance. This position is in charge of overseeing the operations and maintenance of the ship's deck, including navigation, safety, and security. They work closely with the executive officer (XO) to ensure the smooth functioning of the deck department and the ship as a whole.

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  • 4. 

    An amount of money a member has coming out of his regular pay:

    • A.

      Quarters

    • B.

      Geedunk

    • C.

      Leave

    • D.

      Turn to

    • E.

      Allotment

    Correct Answer
    E. Allotment
    Explanation
    An allotment refers to an amount of money that is deducted from a member's regular pay. This deduction is typically made for a specific purpose, such as for savings, insurance, or other financial obligations. It is a predetermined and regular deduction that is automatically taken out of the member's pay before they receive it.

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  • 5. 

    Door:

    • A.

      Colors

    • B.

      Ensign

    • C.

      Topside

    • D.

      Hatch

    • E.

      Working aloft

    Correct Answer
    D. Hatch
    Explanation
    The word "hatch" is the only one in the given list that is related to a door. The other words, "colors," "ensign," "topside," and "working aloft," do not have any direct connection to doors. Therefore, "hatch" is the correct answer.

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  • 6. 

    To dispose of by throwing over the side:

    • A.

      Lifeline

    • B.

      Turn to

    • C.

      Deep six

    • D.

      Ladder

    • E.

      Working aloft

    Correct Answer
    C. Deep six
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "deep six". This phrase is a nautical term that means to dispose of something by throwing it over the side of a ship into the deep water. It is often used metaphorically to indicate getting rid of something completely or permanently. In this context, "deep six" is the most appropriate choice as it directly relates to the action of disposing of something by throwing it overboard.

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  • 7. 

    Downstairs:

    • A.

      Aye-aye

    • B.

      Ensign

    • C.

      Allotment

    • D.

      Taps

    • E.

      Below

    Correct Answer
    E. Below
    Explanation
    The word "below" is the only word in the given list that is synonymous with "downstairs". It refers to a position or place that is lower or beneath something else. The other words in the list do not have the same meaning as "downstairs".

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  • 8. 

    Lock, put away or stop work:

    • A.

      Gear locker

    • B.

      Secure

    • C.

      Adrift

    • D.

      Aft-end

    • E.

      Swab

    Correct Answer
    B. Secure
    Explanation
    The word "secure" means to lock, put away or stop work. It is the most appropriate term among the given options to describe the action of ensuring something is safe, protected, or fixed in place. The other options do not accurately convey the meaning of locking or stopping work. Therefore, "secure" is the correct answer.

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  • 9. 

    All the equipment used in mooring or anchoring a ship:

    • A.

      Working aloft

    • B.

      Galley

    • C.

      Barracks

    • D.

      Ground tackle

    • E.

      Hatch

    Correct Answer
    D. Ground tackle
    Explanation
    Ground tackle refers to the equipment used in mooring or anchoring a ship. It includes items such as anchors, chains, ropes, and winches. These are essential for securing a ship in place and preventing it from drifting or moving with the current or wind. Ground tackle is crucial for the safety and stability of the ship, as it provides the necessary resistance against external forces.

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  • 10. 

    Any commissioned officer in paygrade 0-7 or above:

    • A.

      First lieutenant

    • B.

      Ensign

    • C.

      Flag officer

    • D.

      Reveille

    • E.

      Rating

    Correct Answer
    C. Flag officer
    Explanation
    A flag officer refers to any commissioned officer in paygrade 0-7 or above. This term is used to denote high-ranking officers in the military, such as admirals or generals. They are typically responsible for commanding large units or overseeing strategic operations. The other options, first lieutenant, ensign, reveille, and rating, do not specifically refer to officers in this paygrade range and therefore are not correct answers.

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  • 11. 

    Hallway:

    • A.

      Chit

    • B.

      Passageway

    • C.

      Overhead

    • D.

      Liberty

    • E.

      Reveille

    Correct Answer
    B. Passageway
    Explanation
    The word "hallway" refers to a narrow passage or corridor that connects different rooms or spaces in a building. Similarly, a "passageway" also denotes a narrow path or corridor that allows passage from one place to another. Therefore, "passageway" is a suitable synonym for "hallway" as it accurately describes the same concept of a narrow pathway within a building.

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  • 12. 

    An order to resume work or duties:

    • A.

      Buoy

    • B.

      Tattoo

    • C.

      Galley

    • D.

      Leave

    • E.

      Carry on

    Correct Answer
    E. Carry on
    Explanation
    The term "carry on" refers to an order given to continue or resume work or duties. It implies that the person should not stop or pause their activities, but rather continue with their tasks. This phrase is often used in professional or military settings to instruct individuals to proceed with their responsibilities without interruption.

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  • 13. 

    Working above the highest deck:

    • A.

      Topside

    • B.

      Working aloft

    • C.

      Secure

    • D.

      Gangway

    • E.

      Fast

    Correct Answer
    B. Working aloft
    Explanation
    "Working aloft" refers to working at a higher level or height, typically above the highest deck of a ship or vessel. It implies performing tasks or duties that require being elevated or working on elevated structures or areas. This term is commonly used in maritime and naval contexts to describe tasks such as rigging, maintenance, or repairs performed on masts, sails, or other high areas of a ship.

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  • 14. 

    A device to allow movement of personnel from one level to another:

    • A.

      Ladder

    • B.

      Passageway

    • C.

      Geedunk

    • D.

      Jack box

    • E.

      Aft-end

    Correct Answer
    A. Ladder
    Explanation
    A ladder is a device specifically designed to allow movement of personnel from one level to another. It consists of a series of rungs or steps that are connected by vertical supports, providing a means for individuals to climb or descend between different heights. Unlike the other options listed, such as passageway, geedunk, jack box, and aft-end, a ladder is specifically designed for vertical movement and is commonly used in various settings, including construction sites, homes, and emergency situations.

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  • 15. 

    Reply to an order or command meaning "I understand and will comply":

    • A.

      Bunk

    • B.

      Hatch

    • C.

      Aye-aye

    • D.

      Jack box

    • E.

      Colors

    Correct Answer
    C. Aye-aye
    Explanation
    The term "aye-aye" is a nautical expression used to acknowledge an order or command and indicate understanding and compliance. It is commonly used in military or naval contexts, where clear communication and obedience to orders are crucial. The term originated from the phrase "aye, aye, sir," which was shortened to "aye-aye" over time.

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  • 16. 

    Loose from moorings and out of control:

    • A.

      Adrift

    • B.

      Cast off

    • C.

      Buoy

    • D.

      Gangway

    • E.

      Deep six

    Correct Answer
    A. Adrift
    Explanation
    The word "adrift" means to be loose from moorings and out of control. This term is often used to describe a situation where something, such as a boat or an object, is floating aimlessly without any direction or control. It implies a lack of stability or fixed position, suggesting that the object is at the mercy of external forces such as wind or currents. Therefore, "adrift" is the most appropriate term among the given options to describe the given scenario.

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  • 17. 

    End of day:

    • A.

      Head

    • B.

      Quarters

    • C.

      Fast

    • D.

      Turn to

    • E.

      Taps

    Correct Answer
    E. Taps
    Explanation
    "End of day" typically refers to the time when a workday or business day comes to a close. In this context, "taps" can refer to the military bugle call played at the end of the day to signal lights out and quiet time. It can also be interpreted as a metaphorical reference to closing or shutting down operations or activities for the day.

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  • 18. 

    Storage room:

    • A.

      Hatch

    • B.

      Jack box

    • C.

      Gear locker

    • D.

      Head

    • E.

      Sixkbay

    Correct Answer
    C. Gear locker
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "gear locker" because it is the only option that is related to storage. The other options, such as "hatch," "jack box," "head," and "sixkbay," do not specifically refer to storage areas. Therefore, "gear locker" is the most appropriate choice in this context.

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  • 19. 

    Place to eat:

    • A.

      Fathom

    • B.

      Mess deck

    • C.

      Below

    • D.

      Galley

    • E.

      Barracks

    Correct Answer
    B. Mess deck
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "mess deck" because it is a common term used in the military to refer to the area where meals are served. It is typically located below deck on a ship or in a designated area on land. The other options, such as "fathom," "below," "galley," and "barracks," do not specifically relate to a place to eat.

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  • 20. 

    Assembling of all hands for muster, instruction and inspection:

    • A.

      Rating

    • B.

      Aft-end

    • C.

      Quarters

    • D.

      Colors

    • E.

      All hands

    Correct Answer
    C. Quarters
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "quarters". In a military or naval context, "quarters" refers to the designated location where personnel are required to assemble for muster, instruction, and inspection. It is a term used to indicate the gathering of all members of a unit or crew in a specific area. In this scenario, "quarters" would be the appropriate term to describe the assembling of all hands for muster, instruction, and inspection.

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  • 21. 

    Bed:

    • A.

      Rack

    • B.

      Chit

    • C.

      Barracks

    • D.

      Hatch

    • E.

      Geedunk

    Correct Answer
    A. Rack
    Explanation
    The word "bed" is associated with the word "rack" because a rack is a piece of furniture that is commonly used to hold or support a bed. The other options, such as "chit," "barracks," "hatch," and "geedunk," do not have a direct or obvious connection to the word "bed." Therefore, "rack" is the most appropriate and logical choice.

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  • 22. 

    Compartment in which anchor chain is stowed:

    • A.

      Rack

    • B.

      Gear locker

    • C.

      Jack box

    • D.

      Chain locker

    • E.

      Ground tackle

    Correct Answer
    D. Chain locker
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "chain locker." A chain locker is a compartment where the anchor chain is stored on a boat or ship. It is designed to securely hold the chain and prevent it from tangling or causing damage to other equipment. This compartment is typically located near the bow of the vessel and is easily accessible for deploying and retrieving the anchor.

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  • 23. 

    Place to wash dishes:

    • A.

      Scullery

    • B.

      Galley

    • C.

      Scuttlebutt

    • D.

      Barracks

    • E.

      Chow hall

    Correct Answer
    A. Scullery
    Explanation
    A scullery is a room or area in a house or building where dishes, pots, and pans are washed and cleaned. It is typically located near the kitchen and is used for tasks such as dishwashing, food preparation, and storage of kitchen utensils. The other options, such as galley, scuttlebutt, barracks, and chow hall, do not specifically refer to a place for washing dishes. A galley is a kitchen on a ship, scuttlebutt refers to gossip or rumors, barracks are military housing, and a chow hall is a dining facility.

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  • 24. 

    Snugly secured:

    • A.

      Secure

    • B.

      Fast

    • C.

      Lifeline

    • D.

      Aft-end

    • E.

      Adrift

    Correct Answer
    B. Fast
    Explanation
    The term "snugly secured" implies that something is firmly and tightly fixed or attached. Among the given options, "fast" best fits this description as it means to secure or attach something firmly in place. The other options do not convey the same sense of being securely fixed or attached.

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  • 25. 

    Building where Sailors live:

    • A.

      Barracks

    • B.

      Bunk

    • C.

      Galley

    • D.

      Quarters

    • E.

      General quarters

    Correct Answer
    A. Barracks
    Explanation
    A barracks is a building where sailors live. It is a common term used in the military to refer to the living quarters for enlisted personnel. Sailors stay in barracks when they are not on duty or at sea. This term is specific to the navy and is used to distinguish their living arrangements from other branches of the military.

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  • 26. 

    Wake up, start a new day:

    • A.

      Taps

    • B.

      Tattoo

    • C.

      Reveille

    • D.

      Rating

    • E.

      Ensign

    Correct Answer
    C. Reveille
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "reveille." Reveille is a term used to describe the signal that is played early in the morning to wake up military personnel. It is often played on a bugle or drum. In the context of the given options, "taps" is a bugle call played at night to signal lights out, "tattoo" is a military drumbeat played in the evening, "rating" refers to a sailor's job specialty in the Navy, and "ensign" is a rank in the Navy. Therefore, "reveille" is the only option that fits the theme of starting a new day.

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  • 27. 

    Lines erected around the weather decks of a ship to prevent personnel from falling or being washed over the side:

    • A.

      Ground tackle

    • B.

      Rating

    • C.

      Lifeline

    • D.

      Scullery

    • E.

      Chit

    Correct Answer
    C. Lifeline
    Explanation
    A lifeline is a line or rope that is installed around the weather decks of a ship to ensure the safety of personnel. It serves as a barrier to prevent individuals from falling overboard or being washed over the side during rough weather conditions. The lifeline acts as a protective measure, providing a physical boundary and helping to maintain the safety of the crew members on board the ship.

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  • 28. 

    An anchored float used as an aid to navigation or to mark the location of an object:

    • A.

      Cast off

    • B.

      Adrift

    • C.

      Secure

    • D.

      Deep six

    • E.

      Buoy

    Correct Answer
    E. Buoy
    Explanation
    A buoy is an anchored float that is used as an aid to navigation or to mark the location of an object. It is typically placed in bodies of water such as oceans, lakes, or rivers to provide guidance to ships and boats. Buoys are designed to float on the surface of the water and are often brightly colored and equipped with reflective materials or lights for visibility. They play a crucial role in ensuring the safety of maritime navigation by indicating hazards, channels, or other important information to mariners.

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  • 29. 

    Ceiling:

    • A.

      Head

    • B.

      Chit

    • C.

      Topside

    • D.

      Hatch

    • E.

      Overhead

    Correct Answer
    E. Overhead
    Explanation
    The word "ceiling" refers to the upper interior surface of a room. Among the given options, "overhead" is the most suitable word as it directly relates to the concept of something being situated or occurring above or on top. The other options such as "head," "chit," "topside," and "hatch" do not specifically pertain to the upper part of a room or space. Therefore, "overhead" is the correct answer.

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  • 30. 

    Five minutes before taps:

    • A.

      Leave

    • B.

      Reveille

    • C.

      Tattoo

    • D.

      Ensign

    • E.

      Colors

    Correct Answer
    C. Tattoo
  • 31. 

    An opening in a bulwark or lifeline that provides access to a brow or accommodation ladder:

    • A.

      Fathom

    • B.

      Aft-end

    • C.

      Gangway

    • D.

      Chit

    • E.

      Hatch

    Correct Answer
    C. Gangway
    Explanation
    A gangway is an opening in a bulwark or lifeline that provides access to a brow or accommodation ladder. It is a passage or walkway that allows people to move from one place to another, typically from a ship to the shore or vice versa. In this context, the term "gangway" refers to a specific type of opening that serves as a means of entry or exit on a ship.

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  • 32. 

    Brass or shiny metal kept polished rather than painted:

    • A.

      Liberty

    • B.

      Brightwork

    • C.

      Colors

    • D.

      Taps

    • E.

      Scuttlebutt

    Correct Answer
    B. Brightwork
    Explanation
    Brightwork refers to brass or shiny metal that is kept polished rather than painted. It is a term commonly used in the context of boats or ships, where the metal fittings and fixtures are maintained in a polished and shiny condition. This not only enhances the aesthetic appeal but also helps to protect the metal from corrosion. Therefore, brightwork is the correct answer in this context.

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  • 33. 

    National flag:

    • A.

      Ensign

    • B.

      Rating

    • C.

      Buoy

    • D.

      Tattoo

    • E.

      Colors

    Correct Answer
    A. Ensign
    Explanation
    An ensign is a type of flag that is used to represent a nation, usually on a ship or military vessel. It is often used as a symbol of national identity and pride. In this context, the term "national flag" refers to an ensign. The other options listed, such as rating, buoy, tattoo, and colors, do not accurately describe a national flag.

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  • 34. 

    Mop:

    • A.

      Geedunk

    • B.

      Overhead

    • C.

      Chit

    • D.

      Brightwork

    • E.

      Swab

    Correct Answer
    E. Swab
  • 35. 

    Permission to leave the base usually for not more than 48 hours:

    • A.

      Leave

    • B.

      Liberty

    • C.

      Allotment

    • D.

      Field day

    • E.

      Carry on

    Correct Answer
    B. Liberty
    Explanation
    Liberty is the correct answer because it refers to the permission granted to individuals to leave the base for a limited period, typically not exceeding 48 hours. This term is commonly used in military contexts to denote the freedom given to soldiers to temporarily depart from their assigned location.

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  • 36. 

    Upstairs:

    • A.

      Overhead

    • B.

      Topside

    • C.

      Head

    • D.

      Gangway

    • E.

      Quarters

    Correct Answer
    B. Topside
    Explanation
    The word "topside" is the correct answer because it is a synonym for "upstairs." It refers to the upper level or higher part of a structure or object. In this context, "topside" is the most appropriate choice among the given options as it directly relates to the concept of being located above or on the upper floor.

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  • 37. 

    Begin work:

    • A.

      Turn to

    • B.

      Carry on

    • C.

      All hands

    • D.

      Cast off

    • E.

      Deep six

    Correct Answer
    A. Turn to
  • 38. 

    Near or toward the stern of the vessel:

    • A.

      Below

    • B.

      Deep six

    • C.

      Hatch

    • D.

      Ladder

    • E.

      Aft-end

    Correct Answer
    E. Aft-end
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "aft-end". "Aft-end" refers to the area or direction towards the stern of the vessel. The term "aft" is commonly used in nautical language to indicate the back or rear of a ship, while "end" simply means the extremity or furthest point. Therefore, "aft-end" accurately describes the location or direction towards the stern of the vessel.

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  • 39. 

    To throw off:

    • A.

      Carry on

    • B.

      Deep six

    • C.

      Cast off

    • D.

      Adrift

    • E.

      Aft-end

    Correct Answer
    C. Cast off
    Explanation
    The phrase "to throw off" means to get rid of or release something. In this context, "cast off" is the most suitable option as it means to release or let go of something, such as a rope or anchor. The other options do not convey the same meaning of getting rid of or releasing something. "Carry on" means to continue, "deep six" refers to burying something deep underwater, "adrift" means floating without direction, and "aft-end" refers to the rear part of a ship or aircraft. Therefore, "cast off" is the correct answer.

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  • 40. 

    Drinking fountain:

    • A.

      Head

    • B.

      Jack box

    • C.

      Scullery

    • D.

      Scuttlebutt

    • E.

      Geedunk

    Correct Answer
    D. Scuttlebutt
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "scuttlebutt." Scuttlebutt is a term used to refer to a drinking fountain on a ship. It originated from the nautical slang where "scuttle" means to make a hole in a ship's hull and "butt" refers to a cask or barrel. Therefore, scuttlebutt became associated with the drinking fountain, which usually had a cask-like structure. The other options provided, such as head, jack box, scullery, and geedunk, do not have the same association with a drinking fountain.

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  • 41. 

    The entire ship's company, both officer and enlisted:

    • A.

      Aye-aye

    • B.

      All hands

    • C.

      Liberty

    • D.

      Turn to

    • E.

      Ladder

    Correct Answer
    B. All hands
    Explanation
    "All hands" is the correct answer because it is a nautical term used to refer to the entire ship's company, including both officers and enlisted personnel. It is a way to address or gather everyone on board the ship for various purposes such as drills, announcements, or important tasks. This term signifies the unity and collective responsibility of the entire crew working together as a team.

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  • 42. 

    A job specialty title:

    • A.

      Reveille

    • B.

      Tattoo

    • C.

      Head

    • D.

      Rating

    • E.

      First lieutenant

    Correct Answer
    D. Rating
    Explanation
    The term "rating" is commonly used in the military to refer to a job specialty or occupational field. It is used to categorize and classify individuals based on their skills and expertise in a particular area. The other options listed, such as "reveille," "tattoo," "head," and "first lieutenant," do not typically refer to job specialties in the same way that "rating" does.

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  • 43. 

    Kitchen:

    • A.

      Scullery

    • B.

      Sickbay

    • C.

      Head

    • D.

      Galley

    • E.

      Scullery

    Correct Answer
    D. Galley
    Explanation
    A galley is a type of kitchen on a ship or aircraft. It is the only option that is related to a kitchen, while the other options (scullery, sickbay, head) are not typically associated with kitchens. Therefore, the correct answer is galley.

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  • 44. 

    General cleaning day, usually the day before an inspection:

    • A.

      Chit

    • B.

      Brightwork

    • C.

      Scullery

    • D.

      General quarters

    • E.

      Field day

    Correct Answer
    E. Field day
    Explanation
    A "field day" refers to a general cleaning day, typically done before an inspection. It involves cleaning and tidying up various areas, such as the chit, brightwork, scullery, and general quarters. This term is commonly used in military or naval contexts, where a thorough cleaning of the entire facility is required to ensure it is in top condition for inspection.

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  • 45. 

    All the equipment used in mooring or anchoring a ship:

    • A.

      Geedunk

    • B.

      Jack box

    • C.

      Chit book

    • D.

      Ground tackle

    • E.

      Chain locker

    Correct Answer
    D. Ground tackle
    Explanation
    Ground tackle refers to all the equipment used in mooring or anchoring a ship, including chains, ropes, anchors, and any other gear necessary to secure the ship in place. The other options listed, such as geedunk, jack box, and chit book, do not relate to the equipment used in mooring or anchoring a ship.

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  • 46. 

    Bathroom:

    • A.

      Fast

    • B.

      Sickbay

    • C.

      Head

    • D.

      Hatch

    • E.

      Jack box

    Correct Answer
    C. Head
    Explanation
    The word "head" is the correct answer because it is the only word in the given list that is related to a bathroom. In naval terminology, the term "head" is used to refer to a bathroom or toilet. The other words in the list do not have any direct connection to a bathroom.

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  • 47. 

    Authorized vacation:

    • A.

      Leave

    • B.

      Liberty

    • C.

      Reveille

    • D.

      Allotment

    • E.

      Field day

    Correct Answer
    A. Leave
    Explanation
    The term "authorized vacation" refers to the approved time off from work or duty that an individual is granted by their employer or superior. This is commonly known as "leave" and can be taken for various reasons such as personal, medical, or vacation purposes. It is a formal arrangement where the individual is given permission to be absent from their regular responsibilities for a specific period of time.

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  • 48. 

    Coupon or reciept book:

    • A.

      Rack

    • B.

      Chit

    • C.

      Fathom

    • D.

      Geedunk

    • E.

      Rating

    Correct Answer
    B. Chit
    Explanation
    A chit is a small piece of paper or voucher that is often used as a coupon or receipt. It is commonly found in a coupon or receipt book, which is a collection of these chits. The other options - rack, fathom, geedunk, and rating - do not have any direct association with a coupon or receipt book.

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  • 49. 

    Access box to sound-powered phone circuitry:

    • A.

      Chain locker

    • B.

      Ground tackle

    • C.

      General quarters

    • D.

      Jack box

    • E.

      Gear locker

    Correct Answer
    D. Jack box
    Explanation
    A jack box is a device that allows access to sound-powered phone circuitry. It is used to connect multiple sound-powered phones together in a circuit, allowing for communication between different areas of a ship or facility. The jack box acts as a central hub where the phones can be plugged in, and it also provides the necessary electrical connections for the circuit to function properly.

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  • 50. 

    Hospital or medical clinic:

    • A.

      Scullery

    • B.

      Galley

    • C.

      Barracks

    • D.

      General quarters

    • E.

      Sickbay

    Correct Answer
    E. Sickbay
    Explanation
    Sickbay is the correct answer because it is a specific area within a hospital or medical clinic where patients who are sick or injured are treated. The other options (scullery, galley, barracks, and general quarters) are not typically associated with hospitals or medical clinics and do not provide medical care to patients.

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