Hardest Trivia Questions Test On Human Anatomy

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Hardest Trivia Questions Test On Human Anatomy - Quiz

This quiz is the Hardest Trivia Questions Test on Human Anatomy! The human boy is made of over seventy organs, and they each have a specific function they should perform for a host to survive. The most vital organs in the body are the brain, heart, kidneys, liver, and lungs. Take the quiz and see how much you know about the human boy from your classes.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    Which of the following structures is located in the alveolar processes?

    • A.

      Teeth

    • B.

      Villi

    • C.

      Hard palate

    • D.

      Soft palate

    Correct Answer
    A. Teeth
    Explanation
    Teeth are located in the alveolar processes. The alveolar processes are the bony ridges that support and hold the teeth in place within the oral cavity. The teeth are anchored in the alveolar sockets, which are sockets within the alveolar processes. Therefore, the correct answer is teeth.

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  • 2. 

    The portion of the stomach surrounding the lower esophageal sphincter is called the

    • A.

      Cardia

    • B.

      Fundus

    • C.

      Pylorus

    • D.

      Antrum

    Correct Answer
    A. Cardia
    Explanation
    The cardia is the correct answer because it refers to the portion of the stomach that surrounds the lower esophageal sphincter. This area is responsible for preventing stomach acid and food from flowing back into the esophagus. The fundus is the upper part of the stomach, the pylorus is the lower part that connects to the small intestine, and the antrum is the lower portion of the stomach that helps with the mixing and grinding of food.

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  • 3. 

    The islets of Langerhans secrete

    • A.

      Pancreatic juice

    • B.

      Insulin

    • C.

      Intrinsic factor

    • D.

      Inhibiting hormones

    Correct Answer
    B. Insulin
    Explanation
    The islets of Langerhans are clusters of cells in the pancreas that are responsible for producing and secreting various hormones, including insulin. Insulin plays a crucial role in regulating blood sugar levels by allowing cells to take in glucose from the bloodstream. It helps to lower blood sugar levels by promoting the uptake and storage of glucose in cells, especially in the liver, muscle, and fat tissues. Insulin also helps to inhibit the breakdown of stored glucose, proteins, and fats. Therefore, the correct answer is insulin.

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  • 4. 

    The area in the duodenum where the common bile duct and the pancreatic duct empty is called the 

    • A.

      Ampulla of vater

    • B.

      Duct of santorini

    • C.

      Wirsungs duct

    • D.

      Islets of langerhans

    Correct Answer
    A. Ampulla of vater
    Explanation
    The area in the duodenum where the common bile duct and the pancreatic duct empty is called the ampulla of vater. This is a small opening that allows the bile and pancreatic juices to enter the small intestine and aid in digestion. The ampulla of vater is an important anatomical structure in the gastrointestinal system.

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  • 5. 

    The primary function of the gallbladder is to 

    • A.

      Store bile

    • B.

      Produce bile

    • C.

      Digest fats

    • D.

      Store fats

    Correct Answer
    A. Store bile
    Explanation
    The gallbladder's primary function is to store bile. Bile is a fluid produced by the liver that helps in the digestion and absorption of fats. The gallbladder stores the bile until it is needed for the digestion process. When we consume fatty foods, the gallbladder contracts and releases bile into the small intestine to aid in the breakdown and absorption of fats. Therefore, the correct answer is "store bile".

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  • 6. 

    The pllicae circulares microvilli and villi are

    • A.

      All found the large intestine

    • B.

      Structures that increase surface absorption area in the small intestine

    • C.

      Glands that secrete digestive enzymes

    • D.

      Structures that give the intestines its puckered apperance

    Correct Answer
    B. Structures that increase surface absorption area in the small intestine
    Explanation
    The pllicae circulares, microvilli, and villi are structures that increase the surface absorption area in the small intestine. These structures are responsible for maximizing the absorption of nutrients from digested food. The pllicae circulares are circular folds in the intestinal wall, microvilli are tiny projections on the surface of the intestinal cells, and villi are finger-like projections that contain blood vessels and lymphatic vessels. Together, these structures greatly increase the surface area available for absorption, allowing for efficient nutrient uptake in the small intestine.

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  • 7. 

    The first part of the small intestine is the

    • A.

      Duodenum

    • B.

      Jejunum

    • C.

      Ileum

    • D.

      Cecum

    Correct Answer
    A. Duodenum
    Explanation
    The first part of the small intestine is called the duodenum. It is located immediately after the stomach and is responsible for receiving partially digested food from the stomach and further breaking it down with the help of digestive enzymes from the pancreas and bile from the liver. The duodenum plays a crucial role in the absorption of nutrients, such as carbohydrates, proteins, and fats, into the bloodstream.

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  • 8. 

    The appendix is attached to the 

    • A.

      Ascending colon

    • B.

      Descending colon

    • C.

      Cecum

    • D.

      Transverse

    Correct Answer
    C. Cecum
    Explanation
    The appendix is a small, finger-like pouch located at the beginning of the large intestine. It is attached to the cecum, which is the first part of the large intestine. The cecum acts as a reservoir for the waste material before it enters the colon. The appendix is connected to the cecum by a narrow tube called the appendiceal orifice. Therefore, the correct answer is the cecum.

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  • 9. 

    The double-layered apron like structures that hangs from the lower border of the stomach is the 

    • A.

      Greater omentum

    • B.

      Mesentery

    • C.

      Ligamentum

    • D.

      Peritoneum

    Correct Answer
    A. Greater omentum
    Explanation
    The correct answer is the greater omentum. The greater omentum is a double-layered apron-like structure that hangs from the lower border of the stomach. It is composed of fatty tissue and serves as a protective covering for the abdominal organs. It also plays a role in immune response and helps to isolate and contain infections or inflammation within the abdomen.

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  • 10. 

    The main function of the large intestine is to digest 

    • A.

      Digest food

    • B.

      Absorb food nutrients

    • C.

      Reabsorb water and electrolytes

    • D.

      Digest carbohydrates

    Correct Answer
    C. Reabsorb water and electrolytes
    Explanation
    The large intestine is responsible for reabsorbing water and electrolytes from the undigested food that passes through it. This helps to maintain the body's fluid balance and prevent dehydration. The large intestine also plays a role in the formation and elimination of feces. Digesting food, absorbing food nutrients, and digesting carbohydrates are functions primarily carried out by the small intestine.

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  • 11. 

    A chemical reaction that provides energy by the breakdown of food molecules is called

    • A.

      Anabolism

    • B.

      Catabolism

    • C.

      Metabolism

    • D.

      Glycogenesis

    Correct Answer
    B. Catabolism
    Explanation
    Catabolism is the correct answer because it refers to the chemical reaction that breaks down food molecules to provide energy. Anabolism, on the other hand, is the process that builds complex molecules from simpler ones. Metabolism is a broader term that encompasses both anabolism and catabolism. Glycogenesis specifically refers to the synthesis of glycogen from glucose molecules.

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  • 12. 

    Which of the following substances is the body's preferred source of energy?

    • A.

      Carbohydrates

    • B.

      Fats

    • C.

      Proteins

    • D.

      Water

    Correct Answer
    A. Carbohydrates
    Explanation
    Carbohydrates are the body's preferred source of energy because they are easily broken down into glucose, which is readily used by cells for energy production. Unlike fats and proteins, carbohydrates can be quickly metabolized and provide a fast and efficient source of fuel for the body. Additionally, carbohydrates can be stored in the form of glycogen in the muscles and liver, allowing for a readily available energy reserve when needed. Water, on the other hand, is not a source of energy but is essential for various bodily functions.

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  • 13. 

    The process by which glucose is stored in the liver and skeletal muscle cells as glycogen `

    • A.

      Gluconeogensis

    • B.

      Glycogenolysis

    • C.

      Glycogenesis

    • D.

      Glycolysis

    Correct Answer
    C. Glycogenesis
    Explanation
    Glycogenesis is the correct answer because it is the process by which glucose is stored in the liver and skeletal muscle cells as glycogen. During glycogenesis, glucose molecules are converted into glycogen through a series of enzymatic reactions. This process allows for the storage of glucose as glycogen, which can be readily broken down into glucose when energy is needed. Gluconeogenesis is the synthesis of glucose from non-carbohydrate sources, glycogenolysis is the breakdown of glycogen into glucose, and glycolysis is the breakdown of glucose for energy production.

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  • 14. 

    The structure that binds the small intestine to the posterior abdominal wall is the 

    • A.

      Mesentery

    • B.

      Greater omentum

    • C.

      Falciform ligament

    • D.

      Lesser omentum

    Correct Answer
    A. Mesentery
    Explanation
    The mesentery is a structure that binds the small intestine to the posterior abdominal wall. It is a double layer of peritoneum that contains blood vessels, nerves, and lymphatics, providing support and allowing for movement of the small intestine. The greater omentum is a fatty apron that hangs down from the stomach and covers the intestines, while the falciform ligament attaches the liver to the anterior abdominal wall. The lesser omentum connects the stomach and the duodenum to the liver. Therefore, the correct answer is mesentery.

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  • 15. 

    The salivary glands located in the front of the ear that become inflamed and enlarged during mumps are the 

    • A.

      Sublingual

    • B.

      Subungual

    • C.

      Parotid

    • D.

      Submandibular

    Correct Answer
    C. Parotid
    Explanation
    During mumps, the salivary glands that become inflamed and enlarged are the parotid glands. The parotid glands are located in front of the ear and are the largest of the salivary glands. When they become infected with the mumps virus, they can swell up and cause pain and discomfort. This is a characteristic symptom of mumps and helps in diagnosing the infection. The other options, sublingual, subungual, and submandibular, are not associated with mumps or the inflammation of salivary glands.

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  • 16. 

    The catabolism of fats produces which of the following substances

    • A.

      Amino acids

    • B.

      Glycogen

    • C.

      Ketone bodies

    • D.

      Insulin

    Correct Answer
    C. Ketone bodies
    Explanation
    During the catabolism of fats, the body breaks down fats into smaller molecules called ketone bodies. This process primarily occurs when the body is in a state of low carbohydrate availability, such as during fasting or a low-carb diet. Ketone bodies serve as an alternative source of energy for the brain and other tissues when glucose is limited. They are transported to various organs and tissues, where they are converted back into energy through a process called ketolysis. Therefore, the correct answer is ketone bodies.

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  • 17. 

    Vitamins A D E & K are absorbed in the

    • A.

      Intestine

    • B.

      Pancreas

    • C.

      Stomach

    • D.

      Liver

    Correct Answer
    A. Intestine
    Explanation
    Vitamins A, D, E, and K are fat-soluble vitamins, which means they require the presence of dietary fat for absorption. The small intestine is responsible for the absorption of these vitamins, as it is the primary site for the digestion and absorption of fats. The pancreas produces digestive enzymes that aid in the breakdown of fats, but it is not directly involved in the absorption of these vitamins. The stomach primarily digests food and does not play a significant role in the absorption of fat-soluble vitamins. The liver is involved in the metabolism and storage of these vitamins but does not absorb them.

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  • 18. 

    The organ that lies posterior to the greater curvature of the stomach and is connected by a duct to the duodenum is the 

    • A.

      Pancreas

    • B.

      Gallbladder

    • C.

      Small intestine

    • D.

      Liver

    Correct Answer
    A. Pancreas
    Explanation
    The pancreas is the organ that lies posterior to the greater curvature of the stomach and is connected by a duct to the duodenum. It is a glandular organ that plays a crucial role in digestion and the regulation of blood sugar levels. The pancreas produces digestive enzymes that are released into the small intestine to help break down food, and it also produces insulin and glucagon, which are hormones that help regulate blood sugar levels. The gallbladder, small intestine, and liver are not connected to the duodenum by a duct and do not lie posterior to the greater curvature of the stomach.

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  • 19. 

    When body cells require energy what molecule is broken down 

    • A.

      ATP molecule

    • B.

      DNA molecule

    • C.

      Six carbon molecule

    • D.

      ADP molecule

    Correct Answer
    A. ATP molecule
    Explanation
    When body cells require energy, the molecule that is broken down is ATP (adenosine triphosphate). ATP is known as the "energy currency" of cells, as it stores and releases energy for cellular processes. When ATP is broken down, it loses one of its phosphate groups, forming ADP (adenosine diphosphate) and releasing energy that can be used by the cell. Therefore, the correct answer is ATP molecule.

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  • 20. 

    The outer layer of the intestine is the 

    • A.

      Mucosa

    • B.

      Serosa

    • C.

      Muscularis

    • D.

      Submocosa

    Correct Answer
    B. Serosa
    Explanation
    The correct answer is serosa. The serosa is the outermost layer of the intestine. It is a smooth, slippery membrane that helps to protect and lubricate the intestine. It is made up of connective tissue and a layer of epithelial cells. The serosa also helps to anchor the intestine in place within the abdominal cavity.

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  • 21. 

    The cricoid cartilage is a 

    • A.

      Leaf shaped cartilage lying on top of the larynx

    • B.

      Ring of cartilage forming the inferior walls of the larynx

    • C.

      Pair of cone shaped cartilage located at the apex of each arytenoid cartilage

    • D.

      Tubular passageway for air

    Correct Answer
    B. Ring of cartilage forming the inferior walls of the larynx
    Explanation
    The cricoid cartilage is a ring of cartilage forming the inferior walls of the larynx. This cartilage is located just below the thyroid cartilage and is shaped like a signet ring. It provides structural support to the larynx and helps to maintain the patency of the airway. The cricoid cartilage is important in protecting the airway during swallowing and preventing the collapse of the larynx during respiration.

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  • 22. 

    The passageway for foods and liquids into the digestive system and for air into the respiratory system is the 

    • A.

      Trachea

    • B.

      Larynx

    • C.

      Pharynx

    • D.

      Bronchus

    Correct Answer
    C. Pharynx
    Explanation
    The pharynx is the correct answer because it serves as a common passageway for both food and liquids into the digestive system and air into the respiratory system. It is located behind the nasal cavity, mouth, and larynx, and it connects the nasal cavity and mouth to the esophagus and larynx.

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  • 23. 

    The larynx is located between the

    • A.

      Pharynx and trachea

    • B.

      Nasal cavity and pharynx

    • C.

      Trachea and bronchus

    • D.

      Nasal and oral cavities

    Correct Answer
    A. Pharynx and trachea
    Explanation
    The larynx is a part of the respiratory system and is located between the pharynx and trachea. The pharynx is the part of the throat that connects the nasal cavity and the oral cavity to the larynx. The trachea, also known as the windpipe, is the tube that carries air from the larynx to the bronchus, which then branches into the lungs. Therefore, the correct answer is pharynx and trachea.

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  • 24. 

    The vocal cords are located in the 

    • A.

      Pharynx

    • B.

      Larynx

    • C.

      Trachea

    • D.

      Bronchi

    Correct Answer
    B. Larynx
    Explanation
    The vocal cords are located in the larynx. The larynx, also known as the voice box, is a part of the respiratory system located in the throat. It contains the vocal cords, which are responsible for producing sound and enabling speech. The other options, pharynx, trachea, and bronchi, are also parts of the respiratory system, but they do not house the vocal cords.

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  • 25. 

    Which structure has 3 divisions consisting of naso-oropharyngeal?

    • A.

      Trachea

    • B.

      Larynx

    • C.

      Pharynx

    • D.

      Bronchus

    Correct Answer
    C. Pharynx
    Explanation
    The pharynx is the structure that has 3 divisions consisting of naso-oropharyngeal. The pharynx is a muscular tube that connects the nasal cavity and mouth to the esophagus and larynx. It is divided into three parts: the nasopharynx, oropharynx, and laryngopharynx. The naso-oropharyngeal refers to the combined region of the nasopharynx and oropharynx, which are the upper parts of the pharynx. The trachea, larynx, and bronchus are not divided into naso-oropharyngeal divisions.

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  • 26. 

    The function of the trachea is to 

    • A.

      Conduct air to and from the lungs

    • B.

      Conduct air into the larynx

    • C.

      Serve as a resonating chamber for speech

    • D.

      Move the vocal cords

    Correct Answer
    A. Conduct air to and from the lungs
    Explanation
    The trachea is a tube-like structure that connects the larynx to the bronchi, allowing air to pass in and out of the lungs. It serves as a pathway for air to travel during breathing, ensuring that oxygen enters the lungs and carbon dioxide is expelled. Therefore, the correct answer is "conduct air to and from the lungs."

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  • 27. 

    The space between the vocal cords is called the 

    • A.

      Epiglottis

    • B.

      Glottis

    • C.

      Vocal fold

    • D.

      Cricoid cartilage

    Correct Answer
    B. Glottis
    Explanation
    The space between the vocal cords is called the glottis. The glottis is the opening between the vocal folds, which are located in the larynx. When air passes through the glottis, the vocal cords vibrate, producing sound. The glottis plays a crucial role in speech production and phonation.

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  • 28. 

    The nasal cavity is divided into two portions by the 

    • A.

      Ethmoid

    • B.

      Septum

    • C.

      Vorner

    • D.

      Turbinates

    Correct Answer
    B. Septum
    Explanation
    The nasal cavity is divided into two portions by the septum. The septum is a wall made of bone and cartilage that separates the left and right sides of the nasal cavity. It helps to maintain the structural integrity of the nose and provides support for the nasal passages. The septum also plays a role in directing airflow and preventing the mixing of air between the two sides of the nasal cavity.

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  • 29. 

    The structure that drains excess tears to the nasal cavity causing the nose to run is the 

    • A.

      Nasopharynx

    • B.

      Sinus cavities

    • C.

      Nasolacrimal duct

    • D.

      Ciliary glands

    Correct Answer
    C. Nasolacrimal duct
    Explanation
    The nasolacrimal duct is the structure that drains excess tears to the nasal cavity, causing the nose to run. This duct connects the lacrimal sac, which collects tears from the eye, to the nasal cavity. When tears overflow from the eye, they are drained through the nasolacrimal duct, leading to a runny nose.

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  • 30. 

    The cartilaginous nasal septum lies upon which bone 

    • A.

      Hyoid

    • B.

      Vomer

    • C.

      Mandible

    • D.

      Palatine

    Correct Answer
    B. Vomer
    Explanation
    The cartilaginous nasal septum lies upon the vomer bone. The vomer is a thin, flat bone that forms part of the nasal septum, which divides the nasal cavity into two halves. It is located in the midline of the skull, between the nasal passages. The cartilaginous nasal septum rests on top of the vomer bone, providing support and structure to the nasal cavity.

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  • 31. 

    The structure that connects the middle ear and the throat allowing the eardrum to vibrate freely is the 

    • A.

      Exteranal auditory canal

    • B.

      Eustachian tube

    • C.

      Semicircular canal

    • D.

      Labyrinth

    Correct Answer
    B. Eustachian tube
    Explanation
    The eustachian tube is the structure that connects the middle ear and the throat, allowing the eardrum to vibrate freely. This tube plays a crucial role in equalizing pressure between the middle ear and the external environment, preventing discomfort or damage to the eardrum. When we swallow or yawn, the eustachian tube opens briefly, allowing air to flow in or out of the middle ear, equalizing the pressure.

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  • 32. 

    Another name for the tympanic membrane is the 

    • A.

      External ear canal

    • B.

      Eardrum

    • C.

      Semicircular canal

    • D.

      Eustachian tube

    Correct Answer
    B. Eardrum
    Explanation
    The correct answer is eardrum because the tympanic membrane is a thin, cone-shaped layer of tissue that separates the outer ear from the middle ear. It is commonly referred to as the eardrum because it vibrates in response to sound waves, transmitting them to the middle ear. The eardrum plays a crucial role in the process of hearing.

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  • 33. 

    The winding cone-shaped tube of the inner ear is the 

    • A.

      Semicircular canal

    • B.

      Vestibule

    • C.

      Cochlea

    • D.

      Ampulla

    Correct Answer
    C. Cochlea
    Explanation
    The cochlea is the correct answer because it is a winding cone-shaped tube located in the inner ear. It is responsible for converting sound vibrations into electrical signals that can be interpreted by the brain. The cochlea contains tiny hair cells that detect the vibrations and send signals to the auditory nerve, allowing us to perceive and interpret sounds. The semicircular canals and ampulla are also part of the inner ear, but they are responsible for detecting changes in head position and rotational movements, while the vestibule is responsible for detecting changes in linear acceleration.

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  • 34. 

    The nasal sinus located between the nose and the orbits is the 

    • A.

      Frontal sinus

    • B.

      Sphenoid

    • C.

      Ethmoid

    • D.

      Maxillary sinus

    Correct Answer
    C. Ethmoid
    Explanation
    The ethmoid sinus is located between the nose and the orbits. It is a collection of air-filled spaces within the ethmoid bone, which is located between the eyes and behind the nose. The ethmoid sinus plays a role in filtering and humidifying the air we breathe, as well as providing structural support to the skull. It is also involved in the production of mucus, which helps to trap and remove foreign particles from the respiratory system.

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  • 35. 

    Which ossicle of the middle ear covers the oval window

    • A.

      Malleus

    • B.

      Incus

    • C.

      Stapes

    • D.

      Utricle

    Correct Answer
    C. Stapes
    Explanation
    The stapes is the ossicle of the middle ear that covers the oval window. The oval window is a membrane-covered opening that connects the middle ear to the inner ear. The stapes, also known as the stirrup, is the smallest bone in the human body and is attached to the incus (anvil) on one end and the oval window on the other end. When sound waves enter the ear, they cause the eardrum to vibrate, which in turn causes the ossicles to move. The movement of the stapes against the oval window helps transmit sound vibrations from the middle ear to the inner ear.

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  • 36. 

    The large  leaf shaped laryngeal cartilage that acts as  a trap door over the larynx is the 

    • A.

      Thyroid

    • B.

      Cricoid

    • C.

      Epiglottis

    • D.

      Oropharynx

    Correct Answer
    C. Epiglottis
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Epiglottis. The epiglottis is a large leaf-shaped cartilage located at the base of the tongue. It acts as a trap door over the larynx, preventing food and liquid from entering the lungs during swallowing. When we swallow, the epiglottis closes off the opening to the larynx, ensuring that the food goes down the esophagus and into the stomach instead of the respiratory tract.

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  • 37. 

    Which part of the ear is responsible for equilibrium

    • A.

      Semicircular canals

    • B.

      Middle ear

    • C.

      Cochlea

    • D.

      Meatus

    Correct Answer
    A. Semicircular canals
    Explanation
    The semicircular canals are responsible for equilibrium. These canals are fluid-filled structures located in the inner ear and are responsible for detecting rotational movements of the head. When the head moves, the fluid in the canals also moves, which stimulates hair cells in the canals. This information is then sent to the brain, allowing us to maintain our balance and sense of equilibrium. The middle ear is responsible for transmitting sound vibrations to the inner ear, the cochlea is responsible for hearing, and the meatus is the external opening of the ear canal.

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  • 38. 

    A term referring to a waxy secretion in the external ear canal is 

    • A.

      Pinna

    • B.

      Aurum

    • C.

      Cercumen

    • D.

      Saccule

    Correct Answer
    C. Cercumen
    Explanation
    Cercumen refers to the waxy secretion found in the external ear canal. This substance, also known as earwax, is produced by glands in the ear canal and helps to protect and lubricate the ear. It can vary in color and consistency among individuals and serves as a natural defense mechanism against dust, dirt, and bacteria. Regular cleaning of the ear canal is necessary to prevent excessive buildup of cerumen, which can cause hearing problems or discomfort.

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  • 39. 

    Which of the following structures is not an ossicle of the middle ear 

    • A.

      Incus

    • B.

      Vestibule

    • C.

      Stapes

    • D.

      Malleus

    Correct Answer
    B. Vestibule
    Explanation
    The vestibule is not an ossicle of the middle ear. It is a part of the inner ear, specifically located between the cochlea and the semicircular canals. The ossicles of the middle ear include the incus, stapes, and malleus, which are small bones that transmit sound vibrations from the eardrum to the inner ear.

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  • 40. 

    The fluid w in the membranes labyrinth is called 

    • A.

      Perilymph

    • B.

      Endolymph

    • C.

      Intralabyrinthine lymph

    • D.

      Otolymph

    Correct Answer
    B. Endolymph
    Explanation
    Endolymph is the fluid found within the membranous labyrinth of the inner ear. It plays a crucial role in maintaining the balance and hearing functions of the ear. Endolymph is responsible for transmitting sound vibrations and providing sensory information to the brain. It also helps in the regulation of electrolyte balance and the overall health of the inner ear structures.

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  • 41. 

    In the physiology of hearing sound waves collect in the -----and pass on to hit the ----

    • A.

      Auricle ossicles

    • B.

      Ossicles oval window

    • C.

      External auditory canal tympanic Membrane

    • D.

      Ossicles auricles

    Correct Answer
    C. External auditory canal tympanic Membrane
    Explanation
    In the physiology of hearing, sound waves first collect in the external auditory canal. From there, they pass on to hit the tympanic membrane, also known as the eardrum. The external auditory canal acts as a pathway for the sound waves to reach the eardrum, where the vibrations are then transmitted to the middle ear through the ossicles. Therefore, the correct answer is "External auditory canal tympanic Membrane".

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  • 42. 

    Striated voluntary muscle tissue is found in the ----- muscle tissue 

    • A.

      Visceral

    • B.

      Heart

    • C.

      Skeletal

    • D.

      Cardiac

    Correct Answer
    C. Skeletal
    Explanation
    Striated voluntary muscle tissue is found in skeletal muscle tissue. Skeletal muscles are attached to bones and are responsible for voluntary movements of the body. They are called striated muscles because they have a striped appearance under a microscope, due to the organized arrangement of contractile proteins. This type of muscle tissue is under conscious control, allowing individuals to move their limbs, maintain posture, and perform various physical activities. Visceral muscle tissue is found in the walls of hollow organs, such as the stomach and intestines. Cardiac muscle tissue is found in the heart.

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  • 43. 

    The white tough layer of the eye that gives it it's shape  is the 

    • A.

      Cornea

    • B.

      Iris

    • C.

      Sclera

    • D.

      Choroid

    Correct Answer
    C. Sclera
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Sclera. The sclera is the tough, white outer layer of the eye that helps to maintain the shape of the eye. It covers the majority of the eyeball and provides protection for the delicate inner structures. The cornea, iris, and choroid are all important parts of the eye, but they do not specifically contribute to the shape of the eye like the sclera does.

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  • 44. 

    The layer of  the eye that is clear covers the iris and contains no blood vessels is the 

    • A.

      Cornea

    • B.

      Iris

    • C.

      Sclera

    • D.

      Choroid

    Correct Answer
    A. Cornea
    Explanation
    The cornea is the clear layer of the eye that covers the iris and contains no blood vessels. It is responsible for refracting light and protecting the eye from dust, germs, and other foreign objects. The cornea is a transparent structure that allows light to pass through and helps to focus it onto the retina, allowing us to see clearly.

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  • 45. 

    The layer of the eye that absorbs light rays and nourishes the retina through its numerous blood vessels is the 

    • A.

      Sclera

    • B.

      Ciliary body

    • C.

      Choriod

    • D.

      Iris

    Correct Answer
    C. Choriod
    Explanation
    The choroid is the correct answer because it is the layer of the eye that absorbs light rays and nourishes the retina through its numerous blood vessels. The choroid is located between the sclera and the retina and is responsible for supplying oxygen and nutrients to the retina, which is essential for proper vision.

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  • 46. 

    Which muscles alters the shape of the lens of the eye to accommodate near or far vision

    • A.

      Rectus muscle

    • B.

      Oblique muscle

    • C.

      Circular muscle

    • D.

      Ciliary muscle

    Correct Answer
    D. Ciliary muscle
    Explanation
    The ciliary muscle is responsible for altering the shape of the lens of the eye to accommodate near or far vision. When the ciliary muscle contracts, it changes the shape of the lens, allowing it to become more rounded for near vision. When the ciliary muscle relaxes, the lens becomes flatter, enabling clear vision for objects that are far away. This adjustment in lens shape is essential for the eye to focus on objects at different distances.

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  • 47. 

    What structure regulates the amount of light entering the eye and assists in obtaining a clear image 

    • A.

      Pupil

    • B.

      Iris

    • C.

      Cornea

    • D.

      Retina

    Correct Answer
    B. Iris
    Explanation
    The iris is the structure that regulates the amount of light entering the eye and assists in obtaining a clear image. It controls the size of the pupil, which determines the amount of light that reaches the retina. By adjusting the size of the pupil, the iris helps to control the amount of light that enters the eye, allowing for optimal vision in different lighting conditions. This regulation of light helps in obtaining a clear image by preventing excessive light from entering the eye, which can lead to glare and distortion.

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  • 48. 

    Intraocular pressure is primarily dependent on

    • A.

      Vitreous humor

    • B.

      Aqueous humor

    • C.

      Macula lutes

    • D.

      Nerve impulses

    Correct Answer
    B. Aqueous humor
    Explanation
    Intraocular pressure is primarily dependent on the aqueous humor. The aqueous humor is a clear fluid that fills the front part of the eye, between the cornea and the lens. It is continuously produced by the ciliary body and drained out of the eye through the trabecular meshwork. A balance between the production and drainage of aqueous humor helps maintain normal intraocular pressure. If there is an imbalance in this process, such as increased production or decreased drainage, it can lead to elevated intraocular pressure, which is a risk factor for glaucoma.

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  • 49. 

    At the junction of the sclera and cornea is a venous sinus know as the 

    • A.

      Macula

    • B.

      Uvea

    • C.

      Canal of schlemm

    • D.

      Glands of Zeus

    Correct Answer
    C. Canal of schlemm
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Canal of Schlemm. The Canal of Schlemm is a venous sinus located at the junction of the sclera and cornea in the eye. It plays a crucial role in the drainage of aqueous humor from the anterior chamber of the eye. This drainage helps maintain the proper intraocular pressure and prevents the build-up of fluid, which can lead to glaucoma. The Macula is a small area in the center of the retina responsible for central vision, the Uvea is the middle layer of the eye consisting of the iris, ciliary body, and choroid, and the Glands of Zeus is not a valid anatomical term.

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  • 50. 

    The smooth intrinsic muscle that alters the shape of the eye lens is the 

    • A.

      Iris

    • B.

      Ciliary body

    • C.

      Medial rectus

    • D.

      Lateral rectus

    Correct Answer
    B. Ciliary body
    Explanation
    The ciliary body is the correct answer because it contains smooth intrinsic muscles that are responsible for altering the shape of the eye lens. These muscles control the process of accommodation, which allows the eye to focus on objects at different distances. When the ciliary muscles contract, they change the shape of the lens, making it thicker and more curved for near vision. Conversely, when the ciliary muscles relax, the lens becomes thinner and flatter for distant vision.

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Quiz Review Timeline +

Our quizzes are rigorously reviewed, monitored and continuously updated by our expert board to maintain accuracy, relevance, and timeliness.

  • Current Version
  • Nov 16, 2023
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team
  • Apr 03, 2012
    Quiz Created by
    Emmadawn
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