Site Planning And Urban Design Part 3 Quiz

59 Questions | Total Attempts: 990

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Site Planning And Urban Design Part 3 Quiz - Quiz

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Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    URBAN DESIGN CONTROLS Relaxes certain restrictions if builders and developers provide desirable public features and amenities such as plazas, arcades, and other open spaces.
    • A. 

      Incentive Zoning

    • B. 

      Cluster Zoning

    • C. 

      Floor Area Ratio

    • D. 

      Urban Design Guidelines

    • E. 

      Environmental Impact Statement

    • F. 

      Urban Redevelopment Strategies

    • G. 

      Urban Ecological Processes

  • 2. 
    URBAN DESIGN CONTROLS Creating special zoning policies and regulations for medium to large-sized controlled developments.
    • A. 

      Incentive Zoning

    • B. 

      Cluster Zoning

    • C. 

      Floor Area Ratio

    • D. 

      Urban Design Guidelines

    • E. 

      Environmental Impact Statement

    • F. 

      Urban Redevelopment Strategies

    • G. 

      Urban Ecological Processes

  • 3. 
    URBAN DESIGN CONTROLS The proportions between the built area of the building and the lot area. Also referred to as "Plot Ratio." It is used to limit heights and bulks, create setbacks and open spaces, and ultimately to generate a relatively uniform urban fabric.
    • A. 

      Incentive Zoning

    • B. 

      Cluster Zoning

    • C. 

      Floor Area Ratio

    • D. 

      Urban Design Guidelines

    • E. 

      Environmental Impact Statement

    • F. 

      Urban Redevelopment Strategies

    • G. 

      Urban Ecological Processes

  • 4. 
    URBAN DESIGN CONTROLS Frequently used in smaller-sized urban developments such as residential villages, tourist zones, planned unit developments, historical districts, etc. The basic objective of these is to ensure a relatively uniform urban character in such localities, even if sections are designed separately by different architects and planners. These are also formulated for safety and security, to prevent overly contrasting structures adjacent to one another, to establish open spaces, to retain a certain feel or atmosphere associated with the area and so on.
    • A. 

      Incentive Zoning

    • B. 

      Cluster Zoning

    • C. 

      Floor Area Ratio

    • D. 

      Urban Design Guidelines

    • E. 

      Environmental Impact Statement

    • F. 

      Urban Redevelopment Strategies

    • G. 

      Urban Ecological Processes

  • 5. 
    URBAN DESIGN CONTROLS For large planning projects, developers are required to outline the possible effects of the project on the environment. The outline includes the ff:
    • project description
    • existing environment description (physical, social, economic, historical, and aesthetic)
    • impact on environment
    • adverse environmental effects
    • alternatives to proposed action taken
    • long-range impacts
    • irreversible and irretrievable communities of resources likely to result from implementation of proposed project.
    • A. 

      Incentive Zoning

    • B. 

      Cluster Zoning

    • C. 

      Floor Area Ratio

    • D. 

      Urban Design Guidelines

    • E. 

      Environmental Impact Statement

    • F. 

      Urban Redevelopment Strategies

    • G. 

      Urban Ecological Processes

  • 6. 
    URBAN DESIGN CONTROLS Conservation, urban renewal, adaptive re-use, and rehabilitation.
    • A. 

      Incentive Zoning

    • B. 

      Cluster Zoning

    • C. 

      Floor Area Ratio

    • D. 

      Urban Design Guidelines

    • E. 

      Environmental Impact Statement

    • F. 

      Urban Redevelopment Strategies

    • G. 

      Urban Ecological Processes

  • 7. 
    URBAN DESIGN CONTROLS Invasion, block boosting, centralization, and gentrification.
    • A. 

      Incentive Zoning

    • B. 

      Cluster Zoning

    • C. 

      Floor Area Ratio

    • D. 

      Urban Design Guidelines

    • E. 

      Environmental Impact Statement

    • F. 

      Urban Redevelopment Strategies

    • G. 

      Urban Ecological Processes

  • 8. 
    URBAN DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES A term used interchangeably with preservation but having the rather more positive connotation of parts of the building (or the countryside) while retaining the essential spirit of the original.
    • A. 

      Conservation

    • B. 

      Conservation Area

    • C. 

      Urban Renewal

    • D. 

      Adaptive Reuse

    • E. 

      Rehabilitation

  • 9. 
    URBAN DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES An area containing a group of buildings of special architectural or historical significance, which a local authority may designate. Such designation does not preclude the redevelopment of buildings within, but it does not ensure a proper consideration of the desirability, form, and material of any proposed development.
    • A. 

      Conservation

    • B. 

      Conservation Area

    • C. 

      Urban Renewal

    • D. 

      Adaptive Reuse

    • E. 

      Rehabilitation

  • 10. 
    URBAN DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES A general term to describe the idea of consciously renewing the outworn areas of town and cities. Covers most aspects of renewal, including both re-development and rehabilitation. Process of cleaning slum areas which are economically and physically beyond repair, rehabilitation areas where houses and neighborhood facilities can be restored to come up to health, safety, and good living standards, and protective measures in order to prevent enrichment of undesirable influences.
    • A. 

      Conservation

    • B. 

      Conservation Area

    • C. 

      Urban Renewal

    • D. 

      Adaptive Reuse

    • E. 

      Rehabilitation

  • 11. 
    URBAN DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES Conversion of buildings into different uses without significantly altering the structure. Commonly performed in old warehouse districts, converting these structures to residential uses.
    • A. 

      Conservation

    • B. 

      Conservation Area

    • C. 

      Urban Renewal

    • D. 

      Adaptive Reuse

    • E. 

      Rehabilitation

  • 12. 
    URBAN DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES A term used to describe the idea of repairing, redecorating, and in some cases converting, existing structurally sound property to a standard compatible with modern requirements of amenity and health. The term is frequently interchanged with renovation.
    • A. 

      Conservation

    • B. 

      Conservation Area

    • C. 

      Urban Renewal

    • D. 

      Adaptive Reuse

    • E. 

      Rehabilitation

  • 13. 
    URBAN DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES A type of urban ecological process is defined as the entrance of a new population and/or facilities in an already occupied area.
    • A. 

      Invasion

    • B. 

      Block-Boosting

    • C. 

      Centralization

    • D. 

      Gentrification

  • 14. 
    URBAN DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES Forcing the old population out of the area because of social or racial differences.
    • A. 

      Invasion

    • B. 

      Block-Boosting

    • C. 

      Centralization

    • D. 

      Gentrification

  • 15. 
    URBAN DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES An urban ecological process in city land-use patterning referring to an increase in population at a certain geographic center.
    • A. 

      Invasion

    • B. 

      Block-Boosting

    • C. 

      Centralization

    • D. 

      Gentrification

  • 16. 
    URBAN DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES Improving the physical setup and consequently affecting the market for previously run-down areas.
    • A. 

      Invasion

    • B. 

      Block-Boosting

    • C. 

      Centralization

    • D. 

      Gentrification

  • 17. 
    Concept coined by Jean Gottmann for urban complexes in the Northeastern United States. The term means "great city" in greek. Used to refer to massive urban concentrations created from strong physical linkages between three or more large cities:
    • Boston - New York - Philadelphia - Washington (UNITED STATES)
    • San Diego - Los Angeles - San Francisco
    • Dortmund - Essen - Dusseldorf (Germany)
    • The Hague - Rotterdam - Amsterdam (Netherlands)
    • Tokyo - Yokohama - Nagoya - Osaka - Kobe (Japan)
    • A. 

      Megalopolis

    • B. 

      Metropolis

    • C. 

      Conurbation

    • D. 

      City

  • 18. 
    PLANNING TRENDS Mid-sized developments built with the intention of self-sustainability. Used in areas that are being intensively developed for the first time. With mixed uses often the primary land use, it is sometimes referred to as cluster zoning. Ordinary zoning regulations can be suspended for this particular property.
    • A. 

      Planned Unit Development (PUD)

    • B. 

      Transit-Oriented Development (TOD)

    • C. 

      Traditional Neighborhood Developments (TND)

  • 19. 
    PLANNING TRENDS Officially defined as a mixed-use community with an average distance of 670 meters from a transit stop and commercial core area. This trend mixes residential, retail, office, open space, and public uses in a walkable environment, making it convenient for residents and employees to travel by transit, bicycle, foot, or car. It can be developed throughout a metropolitan region. The main proponent of the concept is Peter Calthorpe and other members of the Congress for New Urbanism (CNU)
    • A. 

      Planned Unit Development (PUD)

    • B. 

      Transit Oriented Development (TOD)

    • C. 

      Traditional Neighborhood Developments (TND)

  • 20. 
    PLANNING TRENDS Developments that take the form of traditional neighborhoods, while still accommodating the automobile and other modern amenities. These are finely integrated, walkable communities with a strong local identity and with convivial public places. 
    • A. 

      Planned Unit Development (PUD)

    • B. 

      Transit-Oriented Development (TOD)

    • C. 

      Traditional Neighborhood Developments (TND)

  • 21. 
    The physical expansion of a town, city, or metropolitan area is a result of a continually increasing number of new developments in the outlying areas. Results to a waste of energy, resources, time, and money, and blight in the central city. Fragments the region and creates a series of unrelated developments that consequently creates a weak urban fabric. Also creates unpleasant environments at the street level. Initiated by the automobile, greedy developers, and the "America Dream."
    • A. 

      Sprawl

    • B. 

      Creep

    • C. 

      Slums

    • D. 

      Gentrification

  • 22. 
    Urbanized areas with a balanced mix of human activity.
    • A. 

      Neighborhoods

    • B. 

      Districts

    • C. 

      Corridors

    • D. 

      Streets

    • E. 

      Blocks

    • F. 

      Buildings

  • 23. 
    Areas dominated by a single activity.
    • A. 

      Neighborhoods

    • B. 

      Districts

    • C. 

      Corridors

    • D. 

      Streets

    • E. 

      Blocks

    • F. 

      Buildings

  • 24. 
    Connectors and separators of neighborhoods and districts.
    • A. 

      Neighborhoods

    • B. 

      Districts

    • C. 

      Corridors

    • D. 

      Streets

    • E. 

      Blocks

    • F. 

      Buildings

  • 25. 
    Are not the dividing lines within a city, bur are to be the communal rooms and passages.
    • A. 

      Neighborhoods

    • B. 

      Districts

    • C. 

      Corridors

    • D. 

      Streets

    • E. 

      Blocks

    • F. 

      Buildings

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