Urban Design And Development

44 Questions | Total Attempts: 260

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Visual Development Quizzes & Trivia

Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Is a process that planners can employ to provide detailed guidance to thedevelopment of areas in the city. Seeks to realize the vision for an area bymaking the public realm more organized, aesthetically pleasing, and functional. It is thescience of ‘place-making’ which enhances the value of a city and improves the quality oflife of its people.
    • A. 

      Urban Design.

    • B. 

      Town Planning

    • C. 

      Site Planning

    • D. 

      None of the Choices

  • 2. 
    Draws together the fields of planning and transportation policy, architecturaldesign, development economics, landscape and engineering. It considers environmentalresponsibility, social equity, and economic viability to create livable places of beauty andunique identity (Llewellyn-Davies, 2000).
    • A. 

      Urban design.

    • B. 

      Town Planning

    • C. 

      Site Planning

    • D. 

      None of the Choices

  • 3. 
    This concerns inefficiently performing or outdated existingareas which are candidates for redevelopment. Old developments are normallyfound in the inner city.
    • A. 

      Areas for redevelopment.

    • B. 

      Areas for new development

    • C. 

      None of the choices

    • D. 

      All o the choices except none

  • 4. 
    This concerns still undeveloped or under-developedareas. This concerns city raw land and lightly inhabited areas. These areas are usuallylocated in city hinterlands.
    • A. 

      Areas for new development.

    • B. 

      Areas for redevelopment

    • C. 

      None of the choices

    • D. 

      All of the choices except none

  • 5. 
    The ‘theme’ of a city (whether contrived or natural) and its public amenities suggests the character of a city. 
    • A. 

      Urban Character.

    • B. 

      Urban zone

    • C. 

      Urban Theme

    • D. 

      None of the choices

  • 6. 
    Elements of Urban Character
    • A. 

      Parks, plazas and greenbelts (“Lungs of the city”; promenade; social assembly places)

    • B. 

      Accessibility (Wayfinding instruments; public parking sites; green routes, transport stations)

    • C. 

      Public art and street furniture (Rest and recreation; history)

    • D. 

      Cultural centers (Knowledge facilities such as museums; libraries; venue for performing arts; etc.)

    • E. 

      All of the Above

  • 7. 
    Principles of Urban Design
    • A. 

      Design for all

    • B. 

      Create places for people

    • C. 

      Conserve heritage

    • D. 

      Enrich the existing

    • E. 

      Make connections

    • F. 

      Work with nature

    • G. 

      Mix uses and forms

    • H. 

      Manage the investment

    • I. 

      Design for change

    • J. 

      All of the choices

  • 8. 
    Principles of Urban Design: Urban design does not belong to one group. Urban design should involve people, local communities and those likely to move in.
    • A. 

      Design for all.

    • B. 

      Create places for people

    • C. 

      Conserve heritage

    • D. 

      Enrich the existing

  • 9. 
    Principles of Urban Design: For places to be well-used and well-loved, they must be safe, comfortable, varied, and attractive. They also need to be distinctive, and offer variety, choice, and fun.
    • A. 

      Create places for people.

    • B. 

      Design for all

    • C. 

      Conserve heritage

    • D. 

      Enrich the existing

  • 10. 
    Principles of Urban Design: New development should conserve monuments, groups of buildings, or sites of cultural importance, and natural features, geological and physiographical formations and natural sites of national importance.
    • A. 

      Conserve heritage.

    • B. 

      Design for all

    • C. 

      Create places for people

    • D. 

      Enrich the existing

  • 11. 
    Principles of Urban Design: New development should enrich and complement existing places.
    • A. 

      ​Enrich the existing.

    • B. 

      Design for all

    • C. 

      Create places for people

    • D. 

      Conserve heritage

  • 12. 
    Principles of Urban Design: Places need to be accessible and integrated with their surroundings. One must be able toget around by foot, bicycle, public transport, and car - in that order.
    • A. 

      Make connections.

    • B. 

      Work with nature

    • C. 

      Mix uses and forms

    • D. 

      Manage the investment

    • E. 

      Design for change

  • 13. 
    Principles of Urban Design: Places must balance the natural (climate, landform, landscape and ecology) and theman-made environment to maximize resource conservation and amenity.
    • A. 

      .Work with nature

    • B. 

      Make connections

    • C. 

      Mix uses and forms

    • D. 

      Manage the investment

    • E. 

      Design for change

  • 14. 
    Principles of Urban Design: Stimulating, enjoyable and convenient places meet the various needs of the greatestnumber of users. They also mix different buildings, uses, ownership, leases, and densities.
    • A. 

      Mix. uses and forms

    • B. 

      Make connections

    • C. 

      Work with nature

    • D. 

      Manage the investment

    • E. 

      Design for change

  • 15. 
    Principles of Urban Design: For projects to be developable and well cared for they must be economically viable,well managed and maintained. This means understanding the market considerations ofdevelopers, ensuring long term commitment from the community and the local authority,defining appropriate delivery mechanisms and seeing this as part of the design process.
    • A. 

      Manage the investment.

    • B. 

      Make connections

    • C. 

      Work with nature

    • D. 

      Mix uses and forms

    • E. 

      Design for change

  • 16. 
    Principles of Urban Design:New development needs to be flexible enough to respond to future changes in use,lifestyle and demography.
    • A. 

      Design for change.

    • B. 

      Manage the investment

    • C. 

      Mix uses and forms

    • D. 

      Work with nature

    • E. 

      Make connections

  • 17. 
    Key Technical Persons/Responsible Groups in Urban Design
    • A. 

      Lead: CPDO/ MPDO

    • B. 

      Contributors: Multi-disciplinary technical support team (can include an urban planner, architect, engineer, finance specialist, heritage specialist, community development specialist, etc. depending on the requirements of the area)

    • C. 

      Stakeholders (e.g. business owners, homeowners, potential investors, community representatives)

    • D. 

      All of the choices

  • 18. 
    Steps forThematic Area Assessmentcan be done by a multi-disciplinary team which includes the city,technical specialists, and community stakeholders.
    • A. 

      1. Identify and delineate the boundaries of the particular area to be planned.

    • B. 

      2. Assess the context of the area or community.

    • C. 

      3. Consider/apply Transect-based planning.

    • D. 

      4. Conduct a Visual Preference Survey.

    • E. 

      5. Use the Smart Neighborhood Analysis Protocol (SNAP).

    • F. 

      6. Conduct a vacant lands study.

    • G. 

      7. Conduct a structural and environmental quality survey.

    • H. 

      8. Conduct a land values study.

    • I. 

      9. Conduct studies of aesthetic features of the planning area.

    • J. 

      All of the choices

  • 19. 
    Steps on Thematic Area Assessment: After the land use plan has been drafted, detailed planning can be done in particularareas such as the following:• Central business district• Heritage core• Main corridors (e.g. major commercial avenues)• Transit centers (i.e. within a given radius from a transit stop)• River/ lakeside/ seaside zones• New development areas
    • A. 

      1. Identify and delineate the boundaries of the particular area to be planned.

    • B. 

      2. Assess the context of the area or community

    • C. 

      3. Consider/apply Transect-based planning

    • D. 

      None of the choices

  • 20. 
    Thematic Area Assessment:Context is the area’s character and setting. It is natural as well as human: the forms ofsettlements, buildings and spaces, ecology and heritage, location, and the routes thatpass through it.A thorough appreciation of the overall site context is the starting pointfor designing a distinct place (Llewellyn-Davies, 2000).
    • A. 

      Step 2. Assess the context of the area or community.

    • B. 

      Step 1. Identify and delineate the boundaries of the particular area to be planned.

    • C. 

      Step 3. Consider/apply Transect-based planning.

    • D. 

      Step 4. Conduct a Visual Preference Survey.

  • 21. 
    What is SNAP?
    • A. 

      Smart Neighborhood Analysis Protocol

    • B. 

      Smart Neighborhood Analysis Photography

    • C. 

      Smart Neighborhood Analysis Projects

    • D. 

      Smart Neighborhood Analysis Priority

  • 22. 
    Please familiarize The following presents checklists for the assessment of various elements.Under Step no.2. Assess the context of the area or community.
    • A. 

      • Community- Figure UD- 1. Community and Policy Appraisal (Llewellyn-Davies, 2000)

    • B. 

      • Place - Figure UD- 2. Character Appraisal (Llewellyn-Davies, 2000)

    • C. 

      • Natural Resources - Figure UD- 3. Environmental Appraisal (Llewellyn-Davies, 2000)

    • D. 

      • Connections - Figure UD- 4. Movement Analysis (Llewellyn-Davies, 2000)

    • E. 

      All of the choices

  • 23. 
    Thematic Area Assessment: One of the principles of Transect-based planning is that certain forms and elements belongin certain environments. For example, an apartment building belongs in a more urbansetting, a ranch house in a more rural setting. Some types of thoroughfares are urban incharacter, and some are rural. A deep suburban setback destroys the spatial enclosure ofan urban street; it is out of context.
    • A. 

      Step 3. Consider/apply Transect-based planning.

    • B. 

      Step 2. Assess the context of the area or community.

    • C. 

      Step 1. Identify and delineate the boundaries of the particular area to be planned.

    • D. 

      Step 4. Conduct a Visual Preference Survey.

  • 24. 
    These are Zoning Categories of Transect-based planning. except one.
    • A. 

      T-1 Natural Zone

    • B. 

      T-2 Rural Zone

    • C. 

      T-3 Sub-Urban Zone

    • D. 

      T-4 General Urban Zone

    • E. 

      T-5 Urban Center Zone

    • F. 

      T-6 Urban Core Zone

    • G. 

      The Civic Zone

    • H. 

      Special Districts

    • I. 

      T-7 Farmhouse Zone

  • 25. 
    Under Zoning Categories of Transect-Based Planning: ____consists of lands approximating or reverting to a wilderness condition,including lands unsuitable for settlement due to topography, hydrology or vegetation.
    • A. 

      T-1 Natural Zone.

    • B. 

      T-2 Rural Zone

    • C. 

      T-3 Sub-Urban Zone

    • D. 

      T-4 General Urban Zone

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