Law, Policy, & Ethics Exam

Approved & Edited by ProProfs Editorial Team
The editorial team at ProProfs Quizzes consists of a select group of subject experts, trivia writers, and quiz masters who have authored over 10,000 quizzes taken by more than 100 million users. This team includes our in-house seasoned quiz moderators and subject matter experts. Our editorial experts, spread across the world, are rigorously trained using our comprehensive guidelines to ensure that you receive the highest quality quizzes.
Learn about Our Editorial Process
| By Jwernick
J
Jwernick
Community Contributor
Quizzes Created: 5 | Total Attempts: 63,656
Questions: 31 | Attempts: 106

SettingsSettingsSettings
Law, Policy, & Ethics Exam - Quiz

Answer the following multiple choice and written answer questions


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    What is libel?

    • A.

      A) Publishing a false statement that damages someone’s reputation

    • B.

      B) A tendency to do something

    • C.

      C) Publishing private information about a person

    • D.

      D) Use of outside editors

    Correct Answer
    A. A) Publishing a false statement that damages someone’s reputation
    Explanation
    Libel refers to the act of publishing a false statement that harms someone's reputation. This can involve spreading false information about someone that can damage their character or standing in the community. It is a form of defamation that is typically done in writing or through other permanent mediums, such as print or online publications. Libel is considered a serious offense and can result in legal consequences for the person responsible for spreading false information.

    Rate this question:

  • 2. 

    What is defamation?

    • A.

      A) Publishing unflattering reports about someone

    • B.

      B) An invasion of privacy

    • C.

      C) A clearly labeled personal opinion

    • D.

      D) An untruthful accusation that lowers someone’s reputation

    Correct Answer
    D. D) An untruthful accusation that lowers someone’s reputation
    Explanation
    Defamation refers to making false statements or accusations about someone that harm their reputation. It involves spreading untruthful information about a person, which can lead to damage to their character or standing in the eyes of others. This can be done through various means such as publishing false reports, spreading rumors, or making false accusations. Defamation is a legal term that encompasses both written (libel) and spoken (slander) forms of false statements that harm someone's reputation.

    Rate this question:

  • 3. 

    In invasion of privacy cases, what is meant by intrusion?

    • A.

      A) Pretending to be someone you’re not

    • B.

      B) Trespassing

    • C.

      C) Using a hidden camera or tape recorder

    • D.

      D) All of the above

    Correct Answer
    D. D) All of the above
    Explanation
    In invasion of privacy cases, intrusion refers to all of the above options. Pretending to be someone you're not, trespassing, and using a hidden camera or tape recorder are all examples of intrusive actions that violate an individual's right to privacy. These actions involve invading someone's personal space, gathering information without consent, and deceiving or misrepresenting oneself to gain access to private information or spaces.

    Rate this question:

  • 4. 

    In invasion of privacy cases, what is meant by public disclosure?

    • A.

      A) Broadcasting sensitive material from a person’s private life

    • B.

      B) Requiring a reporter to identify herself or himself

    • C.

      C) Publishing information that is newsworthy

    • D.

      D) All of the above

    Correct Answer
    A. A) Broadcasting sensitive material from a person’s private life
    Explanation
    Public disclosure in invasion of privacy cases refers to the act of broadcasting sensitive material from a person's private life to the public. This could include sharing personal information, images, or videos without the individual's consent, violating their right to privacy. It is important to respect an individual's privacy and not disclose sensitive information without their permission.

    Rate this question:

  • 5. 

    Freedom of the press in the U.S. is __________________.

    • A.

      A) unlimited

    • B.

      B) limited only for school sponsored journalism

    • C.

      C) limited by laws, ethics, and policy

    • D.

      D) guaranteed by the Constitution

    Correct Answer
    C. C) limited by laws, ethics, and policy
    Explanation
    The correct answer is c) limited by laws, ethics, and policy. This means that while freedom of the press exists in the U.S., it is not without restrictions. There are laws in place that regulate what can and cannot be published, such as libel and defamation laws. Journalists also have ethical guidelines that they must adhere to, such as not publishing false information or invading someone's privacy. Additionally, media organizations often have their own policies and guidelines that further limit the freedom of the press.

    Rate this question:

  • 6. 

    In Journalism, ethics involves___________________.

    • A.

      A) self-discipline by writers and reporters

    • B.

      B) following policy guidelines of the publication

    • C.

      C) obeying the law

    • D.

      D) all of the above

    Correct Answer
    D. D) all of the above
    Explanation
    Ethics in journalism encompasses self-discipline by writers and reporters, following the policy guidelines of the publication, and obeying the law. This means that journalists are expected to adhere to a code of conduct that promotes honesty, integrity, and fairness in their reporting. They must exercise self-discipline to avoid bias and sensationalism, follow the guidelines set by their publication to maintain professional standards, and ensure that their work complies with legal and ethical boundaries. By choosing option d) "all of the above," it acknowledges that all these factors are essential components of journalistic ethics.

    Rate this question:

  • 7. 

    Libel and slander are_______________________.

    • A.

      A) essentially the same in meaning

    • B.

      B) two types of obscenity

    • C.

      C) defined by federal rather than state law

    • D.

      D) not important concerns for student journalists

    Correct Answer
    A. A) essentially the same in meaning
    Explanation
    Libel and slander are essentially the same in meaning. Both involve making false statements about someone that can harm their reputation. The main difference is that libel refers to written or printed defamatory statements, while slander refers to spoken defamatory statements. Both are forms of defamation and can result in legal consequences if proven to be false and damaging to someone's reputation.

    Rate this question:

  • 8. 

    Privilege protects a journalist from charges of defamation when___________________.

    • A.

      A) he or she has connections to celebrities

    • B.

      B) the information came directly from the subject

    • C.

      C) the damaging information came from an official government source

    • D.

      D) only this journalist reported the information

    Correct Answer
    C. C) the damaging information came from an official government source
    Explanation
    The correct answer is c) the damaging information came from an official government source. Privilege protects a journalist from charges of defamation when the damaging information is obtained from an official government source. This is because government sources are considered reliable and credible, and journalists are given the privilege to report such information without fear of legal consequences.

    Rate this question:

  • 9. 

    To establish fault in a libel case, a public official must prove____________________.

    • A.

      A) both negligence and actual malice

    • B.

      B) the truth or falsity of the accusation

    • C.

      C) who else might have been responsible

    • D.

      D) all of the above

    Correct Answer
    A. A) both negligence and actual malice
    Explanation
    In a libel case involving a public official, the correct answer is a) both negligence and actual malice. Negligence refers to the failure to exercise reasonable care in determining the truthfulness of the statement, while actual malice refers to making false statements with knowledge of their falsity or with reckless disregard for the truth. To establish fault in such a case, the public official must provide evidence that the accused party acted with both negligence and actual malice.

    Rate this question:

  • 10. 

    To avoid libel changes, a journalist__________________.

    • A.

      A) should check all sources carefully

    • B.

      B) should avoid confidential content in notes

    • C.

      C) should distinguish accuracy from truth

    • D.

      D) all of the above

    Correct Answer
    D. D) all of the above
    Explanation
    A journalist should check all sources carefully to ensure the information they are reporting is accurate. They should also avoid including confidential content in their notes to protect the privacy and safety of individuals involved. Additionally, journalists should distinguish accuracy from truth, meaning they should report the facts objectively and avoid any biases or personal opinions. Therefore, all of these actions are necessary for a journalist to avoid libel changes and maintain their credibility.

    Rate this question:

  • 11. 

    In a story about a traffic accident, you quote one of the victims saying, “That driver’s a lunatic.  He’s a freakin’ menace.”  That remark is:

    • A.

      A) libelous

    • B.

      B) not libelous

    Correct Answer
    B. B) not libelous
    Explanation
    The remark is not libelous because it is an expression of the victim's opinion and subjective belief about the driver. It does not make a false statement of fact that could harm the driver's reputation. Rather, it is a strong expression of the victim's negative opinion about the driver's behavior.

    Rate this question:

  • 12. 

    A shoplifter was arrested at the Family Video and Bookstore after stealing two movies, “Sinful Flesh” and “Young Desires.”  In a story about the crime, you say the movies are “soft-core porn,” but those videos are actually religious-instruction films.  Can the store’s owner, a devout Baptist, win a libel suit against you?

    • A.

      A) Yes

    • B.

      B) No

    Correct Answer
    A. A) Yes
    Explanation
    Yes, the store's owner, a devout Baptist, can win a libel suit against you. This is because you falsely labeled the movies as "soft-core porn" in the story about the crime, which could damage the store owner's reputation and cause harm to their business. The false statement could be considered defamatory and harmful to the store owner's character, making them eligible to win a libel suit against you.

    Rate this question:

  • 13. 

    In writing a story about local acupuncturist Ophelia Paine, you quote a brain surgeon at a nearby hospital who says, “Acupuncturist are all quacks.  They’ll kill you if you’re not careful.”  Paine considers this defamatory.  “Your story will bankrupt me,” she says.  Could she win a libel suit against your publication?

    • A.

      A) Yes

    • B.

      B) No

    Correct Answer
    B. B) No
    Explanation
    No, Paine would not be able to win a libel suit against the publication. While the brain surgeon's statement may be damaging to Paine's reputation, it does not meet the legal criteria for defamation. In order to win a libel suit, Paine would need to prove that the statement was false, made with malicious intent, and caused actual harm to her reputation. Additionally, statements of opinion, such as calling someone a "quack," are generally protected under the First Amendment. Therefore, Paine would not have a strong case for defamation.

    Rate this question:

  • 14. 

    You write a story describing how Al Bino confessed to police after attempting to murder his wife.  After the story runs, a police department spokesman admits they gave you the wrong name; Al Bino was merely a witness to the crime.  Could Al Bino win a libel suit against you for the lie you printed?

    • A.

      A) Yes

    • B.

      B) No

    Correct Answer
    B. B) No
    Explanation
    No, Al Bino would not be able to win a libel suit against you for the lie you printed. In order to win a libel suit, Al Bino would need to prove that the false information printed about him was both defamatory and caused harm to his reputation. However, in this scenario, Al Bino was mistakenly identified as the perpetrator of the crime, not as someone who committed any wrongdoing. Therefore, there was no defamation or harm caused to Al Bino's reputation, making it unlikely for him to win a libel suit.

    Rate this question:

  • 15. 

    In a football-game story, you quote the losing coach, who says, “That referee is blind.  He cost us the game.  He’s got no business officiating in this league.”  Videotapes, however, prove the referee made the right call.  Could the referee win a libel suit against you?

    • A.

      A) Yes

    • B.

      B) No

    Correct Answer
    B. B) No
    Explanation
    The referee would not be able to win a libel suit against you because the statement made by the losing coach is considered a statement of opinion rather than a statement of fact. In order for a statement to be considered libelous, it must be a false statement presented as a fact that harms someone's reputation. Since the statement about the referee being blind and costing the game is an opinion and can be subjective, it would not meet the criteria for libel.

    Rate this question:

  • 16. 

    You’re standing in the hallway, waiting to interview a professor from Iraq.  As you lean against the door to his office, you hear from him making pro-terrorist, anti-American statements.  You take careful notes.  Later, you confront him with his remarks.  He calls them lies and threatens to sue you if you print them.  Could he win?

    • A.

      A) Yes

    • B.

      B) No

    Correct Answer
    A. A) Yes
    Explanation
    The professor could potentially win the lawsuit if he can prove that the statements attributed to him were false and defamatory. In order to win a defamation case, the plaintiff must demonstrate that the statements were false, that they were published or communicated to a third party, and that they caused harm to the plaintiff's reputation. If the professor can provide evidence that he did not make the pro-terrorist, anti-American statements, or that they were misquoted or taken out of context, he may have a valid claim for defamation.

    Rate this question:

  • 17. 

    On his late-night NBC show, Conan O’Brien makes several lengthy jokes in your newspaper, but the editor says you can’t do it without getting approval from NBC.  Those jokes are copyrighted, he says, and NBC could sue the paper if you preprint them verbatim without permission.  Is your editor correct?

    • A.

      A) He’s right; you need permission.

    • B.

      B) He’s wrong; you didn’t.

    Correct Answer
    B. B) He’s wrong; you didn’t.
    Explanation
    The editor is incorrect. The jokes made by Conan O'Brien on his late-night NBC show are indeed copyrighted, and therefore, permission from NBC would be required to preprint them verbatim in the newspaper. If the newspaper were to publish the jokes without obtaining permission, NBC could potentially sue for copyright infringement.

    Rate this question:

  • 18. 

    In writing a story about an outspoken anti-abortion activist, you print that she was once arrested for trying to bomb an abortion clinic.  But you’ve read the court records incorrectly: she only testified at someone else’s trial.  Your newspaper has run a correction, but she’s still furious.  Can she win a libel suit?

    • A.

      A) Yes

    • B.

      B) No

    Correct Answer
    B. B) No
    Explanation
    No, she cannot win a libel suit. Although the newspaper made a mistake in printing the incorrect information about her, they have already issued a correction. In order to win a libel suit, she would need to prove that the newspaper acted with actual malice, meaning they knew the information was false or acted with reckless disregard for the truth. Since the newspaper corrected the mistake, it shows that they did not have malicious intent, making it unlikely for her to win the lawsuit.

    Rate this question:

  • 19. 

    In that story about the pro-life activist, you reveal that she was once arrested for obtaining an illegal abortion herself, back in 1970 (before Roe v. Wade made abortions legal).  She claims that you’ve violated her right to privacy by revealing confidential information about her medical history.  If she takes you to court, can she win her case?

    • A.

      A) Yes

    • B.

      B) No

    Correct Answer
    B. B) No
    Explanation
    No, she cannot win her case. The information that was revealed about her obtaining an illegal abortion in the past is a matter of public record and not confidential. Therefore, her right to privacy has not been violated.

    Rate this question:

  • 20. 

    Gossip about your school’s cheerleaders is posted on a Web site.  You reprint it in your weekly newspaper opinion column, clearly identifying your source.  An angry cheerleader reads your column, gets upset and decides to sue for libel.  Who is most liable?

    • A.

      A) You

    • B.

      B) The gossip Web site

    • C.

      C) Both you and the Web site

    Correct Answer
    C. C) Both you and the Web site
    Explanation
    Both the writer of the newspaper column and the gossip website can be held liable in this situation. The writer is responsible for reprinting the gossip and spreading it further through their column. By clearly identifying the source, they are acknowledging their involvement in disseminating the information. The gossip website is also liable as they initially posted the gossip about the cheerleaders, which led to the writer picking it up and publishing it. Both parties played a role in spreading the potentially defamatory information, making them equally responsible for any harm caused to the cheerleader's reputation.

    Rate this question:

  • 21. 

    Libel laws are consistent from state to state.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    B. False
    Explanation
    The statement that libel laws are consistent from state to state is false. Libel laws vary from state to state in the United States. Each state has its own set of laws and standards regarding defamation, including libel. These laws can differ in terms of what constitutes defamation, the elements required to prove a claim, and the damages that can be awarded. Therefore, it is incorrect to say that libel laws are consistent across all states.

    Rate this question:

  • 22. 

    Someone gives you secret information.  In return, you promise to conceal his identity.  If you suddenly change your mind and publish his name, that’s called “burning a source.”

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    When someone gives you secret information and you promise to conceal their identity, it creates a trust between you and the source. If you break that promise and reveal their name, it is considered "burning a source." This means that you have betrayed their trust and compromised their anonymity, potentially causing harm to them or their reputation. Therefore, the statement "burning a source" is true in this context.

    Rate this question:

  • 23. 

    Someone gives you secret information.  In return, you promise to conceal his identity.  If you suddenly change your mind and publish his name, he could sue you for violating a verbal contract.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    If someone gives you secret information and you promise to conceal their identity, there is an implied verbal contract between the two parties. If you go back on your promise and publish their name, you would be violating this contract. The person who provided the secret information could then potentially sue you for breach of contract. Therefore, the statement is true.

    Rate this question:

  • 24. 

    If you cruelly and unfairly criticize a public figure, that’s called “actual malice.”

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    B. False
    Explanation
    The statement is incorrect. "Actual malice" refers to a legal term used in defamation cases, specifically for public figures, where the person making the statement knows it is false or acts with reckless disregard for the truth. It does not refer to cruel or unfair criticism. Therefore, the correct answer is False.

    Rate this question:

  • 25. 

    A “shield law” prevents a reporter from being sued for libel.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    B. False
    Explanation
    A "shield law" does not prevent a reporter from being sued for libel. Shield laws are designed to protect journalists from having to disclose their confidential sources in court, but they do not provide immunity from defamation lawsuits. Therefore, the statement is false.

    Rate this question:

  • 26. 

    You can publish defamatory statements about people, but as long as you don’t identify them by name, they can’t sue you successfully for libel.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    B. False
    Explanation
    The statement is false. Publishing defamatory statements about people, even without identifying them by name, can still lead to successful libel lawsuits. While not identifying the person may make it more difficult for them to prove the statement is about them, it does not guarantee immunity from legal consequences.

    Rate this question:

  • 27. 

    The “fair comment and criticism” privilege allows you the freedom to say whatever you want when you write a review of a public performance.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    B. False
    Explanation
    The "fair comment and criticism" privilege does not grant unlimited freedom to say whatever you want when writing a review of a public performance. While it does provide some protection for expressing opinions and making fair criticisms, there are still legal limitations and potential consequences for defamatory statements or false information. Therefore, the statement that the privilege allows unlimited freedom is false.

    Rate this question:

  • 28. 

    Directions: In a few sentences, write about what you would do and why. A football coach tells you he’s benching the school’s star quarterback because “he’s been lazy and stupid.  His head’s not in the game – he’s too busy partying and getting laid.”  Can you print that quote?

  • 29. 

    Directions: In a few sentences, write about what you would do and why. A local jazz musician dies.  You’re collecting quotes for a profile about her, and one woman says, “She was a brilliant pianist, but the heroin turned her into a thief and a tramp.”  Can you print that comment?

  • 30. 

    Directions: In a few sentences, write about what you would do and why. After a weeklong manhunt, police finally track down Daryl Lickt and arrest him for murdering his wife.  In the story about his arrest, you refer to Lickt as “the alleged murderer.”  Is it safe to say that?

  • 31. 

    Directions: In a few sentences, write about what you would do and why. A local doctor who specializes in nutrition says that food served in your school cafeteria is unfit for human consumption and that school cooks are unqualified to know the difference between healthy and unhealthy food.  Can you print her comments?

Quiz Review Timeline +

Our quizzes are rigorously reviewed, monitored and continuously updated by our expert board to maintain accuracy, relevance, and timeliness.

  • Current Version
  • Mar 16, 2023
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team
  • May 05, 2011
    Quiz Created by
    Jwernick
Back to Top Back to top
Advertisement
×

Wait!
Here's an interesting quiz for you.

We have other quizzes matching your interest.