AP U.S. History Exam! Hardest Trivia Quiz Questions!

48 Questions | Total Attempts: 1757

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AP U.S. History Exam! Hardest Trivia Quiz Questions! - Quiz

Do you think you could pass this US history exam? History can be a tough subject, and it is especially tough memorizing dates. This quiz can help you put into perspective what you know and what you don’t know about US history. You will find out what the articles of confederation were? You may also need to learn more about the civil war. Take this history quiz and make your confusion a thing of the past.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    A major weakness of the Articles of Confederation was that they
    • A. 

      Created a too-powerful chief executive

    • B. 

      Did not include a mechanism for their own amendment

    • C. 

      Made it too difficult for the government to raise money through taxes and dues

    • D. 

      Denied the federal government the power to mediate disputes between states

    • E. 

      Required ratification of only a simple majority of states

  • 2. 
    Which of the following states the principle of Manifest Destiny?
    • A. 

      The colonists were destined to leave the British empire because of the distance between the New World and England.

    • B. 

      Women are biologically predestined to lives of child rearing and domestic labor.

    • C. 

      America's expansion to the West Coast was inevitable and divinely sanctioned.

    • D. 

      The abolition of slavery in the United States was certain to come about, because slavery was immoral.

    • E. 

      American entry into World War I was unavoidable and was in America's long-term interests.

  • 3. 
    In his opinion on the case Dred Scott v. Sanford, Chief Justice Roger Taney ruled that
    • A. 

      The Supreme Court had the right to rule on the constitutionality of any federal law

    • B. 

      "separate but equal" facilities for people of different races was constitutional

    • C. 

      Corporations were entitled to the same protections guaranteed individuals under the Fourteenth Amendment

    • D. 

      School prayer violated the principle of "separation of church and state"

    • E. 

      Congress had no right to regulate slavery in United States territory

  • 4. 
    Following the Civil War, most freed slaves
    • A. 

      Stayed in the South and worked as sharecroppers

    • B. 

      Joined the pioneering movement as it headed West

    • C. 

      Moved to the North and learned professions

    • D. 

      Took work building the nation's growing railroad system

    • E. 

      Moved to Liberia with the aid of the American Colonial Society

  • 5. 
    The Puritans believed that the freedom to practice religion should be extended to
    • A. 

      Puritans only

    • B. 

      All Protestants only

    • C. 

      All Christians only

    • D. 

      All Jews and Christians only

    • E. 

      All inhabitants of the New World, including Africans and Native Americans

  • 6. 
    The Sugar Act of 1764 represented a major shift in British policy toward the colonies in that, for the first time, the British
    • A. 

      Allowed all proceeds from a tax to stay in the colonial economy

    • B. 

      Attempted to control colonial exports

    • C. 

      Offered the colonists the opportunity to address Parliament with grievances

    • D. 

      Required the colonies to import English goods exclusively

    • E. 

      Levied taxes aimed at raising revenue rather that regulating trade

  • 7. 
    The Know-Nothing Party focused its efforts almost exclusively on the issue of
    • A. 

      Religious freedom

    • B. 

      The right to bear arms

    • C. 

      The prohibition of alcohol

    • D. 

      Women's rights

    • E. 

      Immigration

  • 8. 
    All of the following influenced the United States' decision to declare war against Great Britain in 1812 EXCEPT
    • A. 

      The impressment of American sailors

    • B. 

      British control of the Atlantic and resulting interference in United States trade with Europe

    • C. 

      The American government's certainty that its navy was more powerful than Great Britain's

    • D. 

      Great Britain's alliances with American Indian tribes, which curtailed United States westward expansion

    • E. 

      The failure of the Embargo Act

  • 9. 
    Which of the following does NOT accurately describe the Missouri Compromise of 1820?
    • A. 

      It provided a method for counting slaves among state populations when determining the size of the states' Congressional delegations.

    • B. 

      It allowed Missouri to be admitted to the Union as a slave state.

    • C. 

      It created the free state of Main from territory that belonged to Massachusetts.

    • D. 

      One of its purposes was to maintain the equal representation of free states and slave states in the Senate.

    • E. 

      It included a northern border in the Louisiana Territory above which slavery was prohibited.

  • 10. 
    Between 1820 and 1824, the greatest number of immigrants to the United States came from
    • A. 

      France

    • B. 

      Russia

    • C. 

      Spain

    • D. 

      England

    • E. 

      Ireland

  • 11. 
    Congress brought impeachment proceedings against Andrew Johnson primarily because
    • A. 

      Johnson sought to block the punitive aspects of Congressional Reconstruction

    • B. 

      Johnson's Republican policies had fallen out of favor with the Democratic majority

    • C. 

      The Johnson administration was riddled with corruption

    • D. 

      Johnson's pro-North bias was delaying the readmission of Southern states to the Union

    • E. 

      Many Congressmen personally disliked Johnson, although they agreed with his policies

  • 12. 
    The "First Great Awakening" can be seen as a direct response to which of the following?
    • A. 

      Puritanism

    • B. 

      The Enlightenment

    • C. 

      Transcendentalism

    • D. 

      Existentialism

    • E. 

      Post-modernism

  • 13. 
    Which of the following states the principle of "virtual representation," as it was argued during the eighteenth century?
    • A. 

      Paper money has value even though it is inherently worth very little.

    • B. 

      Slave populations must be counted when figuring Congressional apportionment, even though slaves may not vote

    • C. 

      American property-holding colonists may, if they so desire, join their state legislatures.

    • D. 

      All English subjects, including those who are not allowed to vote, are represented in Parliament.

    • E. 

      All English subjects are entitled to a trial before a jury of their peers.

  • 14. 
    The principle of "popular sovereignty" stated that
    • A. 

      Whenever a new area was settled, all United States citizens were required to vote on the slave status of that area

    • B. 

      Slavery would not be permitted in any area after 1848

    • C. 

      The president, after meeting with public interest groups, was to decide on whether slaves would be allowed in a given territory

    • D. 

      Settlers in the Western territories, not Congress, would decide whether to allow slavery in their territory

    • E. 

      Any settlers disagreeing with federal slavery were free to ignore those laws

  • 15. 
    The majority of those who voted Republican in the 1854 elections were
    • A. 

      Either Northern businessmen or Southern farmers

    • B. 

      Settlers in the Western territories

    • C. 

      Northern abolitionists

    • D. 

      Merchants and businessmen in the Middle Atlantic states

    • E. 

      Recent immigrants

  • 16. 
    Which of the following is NOT a requirement set by the Reconstruction Act of 1867 for Southern states' readmission to the Union?
    • A. 

      Blacks had to be allowed to participate in state conventions and state elections.

    • B. 

      The state had to ratify Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution.

    • C. 

      The state had to pay reparations and provide land grants to all former slaves.

    • D. 

      The state had to rewrite it constitution and ratify it.

    • E. 

      Congress had to approve the new state constitution.

  • 17. 
    The election of 1824 marked a turning point in presidential politics because, for the first time,  
    • A. 

      The presidency was won by someone who was not a member of the Federalist Party

    • B. 

      A presidential and vice-presidential candidate ran together on one ticket

    • C. 

      All the candidates campaigned widely throughout the states

    • D. 

      Political parties officially participated in the election

    • E. 

      The system of choosing nominees by congressional caucus failed

  • 18. 
    The doctrine of nullification stated that
    • A. 

      Legal immigrants may be deported when the fall into a state of destitution

    • B. 

      Congress may override an executive order with a two-thirds majority vote

    • C. 

      The government may take control of a band if its cash reserves fall below a certain percentage of its total deposits

    • D. 

      Municipal and county governments may rescind licenses granted by the state

    • E. 

      A state may repeal any federal lay that it deems unconstitutional

  • 19. 
    Which of the following changes in westward migration occurred in 1848?
    • A. 

      The number of pioneers headed for the Oregon territory decreased while the number headed for California greatly increased.

    • B. 

      The first great wave of migration ended, and the number of migrants remained extremely low until after the Civil War.

    • C. 

      For the first time, pioneers began to settle areas west of the Mississippi River.

    • D. 

      Large numbers of free blacks, unwelcome in the East, began to resettle in the West.

    • E. 

      The government began to enforce quotas limiting the number of people who could migrate each year.

  • 20. 
    Supreme Court decisions concerning Native Americans in 1831 and 1832
    • A. 

      Reinforced the rights states to remove Native American from disputed lands

    • B. 

      Denied them the right to sue in federal court but affirmed their rights to land that was traditionally theirs

    • C. 

      Voided previous treaties between Native Americans and the United states on the grounds that the treaties were unfair

    • D. 

      Granted tribes official status as foreign nations

    • E. 

      Ruled that the federal government had a unilateral right to relocate Native Americans to lands west of the Mississippi

  • 21. 
    In the 1830s, Southern states passes a number of laws regarding the behavior of free blacks. These laws were intended to
    • A. 

      Encourage free blacks to migrate to the North

    • B. 

      Impose a uniform procedure regarding the retrieval of fugitive slaves

    • C. 

      Increase the pool of available black skilled laborers in the growing southern economy

    • D. 

      Guarantee the rights of free blacks traveling through slave states

    • E. 

      Create an official set of guidelines concerning "acceptable" treatment of slaves

  • 22. 
    By what means did the United States take possession of the Oregon Territory?
    • A. 

      The United States was granted the territory in a post-war treaty with France.

    • B. 

      The United States bought it from the Native Americans who lived there.

    • C. 

      United States settlers were the first to arrive in the region; they claimed it for their country.

    • D. 

      Great Britain ceded it tot he United States as part of a negotiated treaty.

    • E. 

      The French sold it to the United states as part of the Louisiana Purchase.

  • 23. 
    Which of the following reformers fought for the rights of the mentally ill?
    • A. 

      Ralph Waldo Emerson

    • B. 

      Horace Mann

    • C. 

      Dorothea Dix

    • D. 

      Lucretia Mott

    • E. 

      Helen Hunt Jackson

  • 24. 
    Which of the following reformers fought for women's rights?
    • A. 

      Ralph Waldo Emerson

    • B. 

      Horace Mann

    • C. 

      Dorothea Dix

    • D. 

      Lucretia Mott

    • E. 

      Helen Hunt Jackson

  • 25. 
    Which of the following reformers fought for educational reform?
    • A. 

      Ralph Waldo Emerson

    • B. 

      Horace Mann

    • C. 

      Dorothea Dix

    • D. 

      Lucretia Mott

    • E. 

      Helen Hunt Jackson

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