Gibilisco - The Bipolar Transistor

16 Questions | Total Attempts: 877

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Disease Quizzes & Trivia

A bipolar transistor is a semiconductor device commonly used for amplification. The device can amplify analog or digital signals. Test out your understanding on this devise by taking up the quick quiz below and note down what you need to read more on. Give it a try and all the best!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    In a PNP circuit, the collector
    • A. 

      Has an arrow pointing inward.

    • B. 

      Is positive with respect to the emitter.

    • C. 

      Is biased at a small fraction of the base bias.

    • D. 

      Is negative with respect to the emitter.

  • 2. 
    In many cases, a PNP transistor can be replaced with an NPN device and the circuit will dothe same thing, provided that
    • A. 

      The power supply or battery polarity is reversed.

    • B. 

      The collector and emitter leads are interchanged.

    • C. 

      The arrow is pointing inward.

    • D. 

      Forget it! A PNP transistor can never be replaced with an NPN transistor.

  • 3. 
    A bipolar transistor has
    • A. 

      Three P-N junctions.

    • B. 

      Three semiconductor layers.

    • C. 

      Two N-type layers around a P-type layer.

    • D. 

      A low avalanche voltage.

  • 4. 
    In the dual-diode model of an NPN transistor, the emitter corresponds to
    • A. 

      The point where the cathodes are connected together.

    • B. 

      The point where the cathode of one diode is connected to the anode of the other.

    • C. 

      The point where the anodes are connected together.

    • D. 

      Either of the diode cathodes.

  • 5. 
    The current through a transistor depends on
    • A. 

      EC.

    • B. 

      EB relative to EC.

    • C. 

      IB.

    • D. 

      More than one of the above.

  • 6. 
    With no signal input, a bipolar transistor would have the least IC when
    • A. 

      The emitter is grounded.

    • B. 

      The E-B junction is forward-biased.

    • C. 

      The E-B junction is reverse-biased.

    • D. 

      The E-B current is high.

  • 7. 
    When a transistor is conducting as much as it can, it is said to be
    • A. 

      In a state of cutoff.

    • B. 

      In a state of saturation.

    • C. 

      In a state of reverse bias.

    • D. 

      In a state of avalanche breakdown.

  • 8. 
    In a common emitter circuit, the gain bandwidth product is
    • A. 

      The frequency at which the gain is 1.

    • B. 

      The frequency at which the gain is 0.707 times its value at 1 MHz.

    • C. 

      The frequency at which the gain is greatest.

    • D. 

      The difference between the frequency at which the gain is greatest, and the frequency at which the gain is 1.

  • 9. 
    The bipolar-transistor configuration most often used for matching a high input impedance toa low output impedance puts signal ground at
    • A. 

      The emitter.

    • B. 

      The base.

    • C. 

      The collector.

    • D. 

      Any point; it doesn’t matter.

  • 10. 
    The output is in phase with the input in
    • A. 

      A common emitter circuit.

    • B. 

      A common base circuit.

    • C. 

      A common collector circuit.

    • D. 

      More than one of the above.

  • 11. 
    The greatest possible amplification is obtained in
    • A. 

      A common emitter circuit.

    • B. 

      A common base circuit.

    • C. 

      A common collector circuit.

    • D. 

      More than one of the above.

  • 12. 
    The input is applied to the collector in
    • A. 

      A common emitter circuit.

    • B. 

      A common base circuit.

    • C. 

      A common collector circuit.

    • D. 

      None of the above.

  • 13. 
    The configuration noted for its stability in RF power amplifiers is the
    • A. 

      Common emitter circuit.

    • B. 

      Common base circuit.

    • C. 

      Common collector circuit.

    • D. 

      Emitter follower circuit.

  • 14. 
    In a common base circuit, the output is taken from
    • A. 

      The emitter.

    • B. 

      The base.

    • C. 

      The collector.

    • D. 

      More than one of the above.

  • 15. 
    Suppose that the input signal to a transistor amplifier results in saturation during part of thecycle. This produces
    • A. 

      The greatest possible amplification.

    • B. 

      Reduced efficiency.

    • C. 

      Avalanche effect.

    • D. 

      Nonlinear output impedance.

  • 16. 
    Suppose that the gain of a transistor in a common emitter circuit is 100 at a frequency of1 kHz, and the gain is 70.7 at 335 kHz. The gain drops to 1 at 210 MHz. The alpha cutofffrequency is
    • A. 

      1 kHz.

    • B. 

      335 kHz.

    • C. 

      210 MHz.

    • D. 

      Impossible to define based on this data.

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