Cultural And Intercultural Quiz Questions

33 Questions | Total Attempts: 583

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Cultural Awareness Quizzes & Trivia

Quiz on Chapter 5 of the Textbook and Week Five's Readings


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Developmental models provide a
    • A. 

      Model of child development.

    • B. 

      Schema within which to consider changes in human growth

    • C. 

      Way of understanding psychology.

    • D. 

      None of the answers are correct.

  • 2. 
    Developmental models have recently begun to emerge with respect to
    • A. 

      Adolescent identity

    • B. 

      Adult identity.

    • C. 

      Religious identity.

    • D. 

      Ethnic and racial identity.

  • 3. 
    One who is totally involved in an ethnic culture, active in organizations and in discussions, and is highly ethnocentric can be said to be in which one of Cross/Spring’s model of ethnic and racial identity?
    • A. 

      Immersion

    • B. 

      Encounter

    • C. 

      Pre-encounter

    • D. 

      Internalization

  • 4. 
    . Individuals who have a strong sense of their own ethnicity, as well as a healthy understanding and respect for others can be said to be in Banks’ category of development called
    • A. 

      Ethnic psychological captivity

    • B. 

      Biethnicity.

    • C. 

      Ethnic encapsulation

    • D. 

      Ethnic identity clarification.

  • 5. 
    . In the Cross-Spring model of ethnic and racial identity, the pre-encounter stage is one in which
    • A. 

      One assumes a new ethnic identity

    • B. 

      One is confronted by an incident that forces questioning of beliefs

    • C. 

      One internalizes negative stereotypes from the mainstream society

    • D. 

      One lives comfortably in two worlds.

  • 6. 
    The ability to adapt to and value cultural differences is a characteristic of a
    • A. 

      Member of a pluralistic society

    • B. 

      Person who has grown up in a monocultural environment.

    • C. 

      Person who dislikes people who are different

    • D. 

      Person who is interculturally competent.

  • 7. 
    In general, an increase in cultural awareness is accompanied by a/an
    • A. 

      . increase in emotional intelligence

    • B. 

      Increase in cognitive sophistication

    • C. 

      Decrease in emotional intelligence.

    • D. 

      Decrease in cognitive sophistication

  • 8. 
    Models of intercultural competence
    • A. 

      Promote acceptance of one’s own group.

    • B. 

      Focus on managing effectively across cultures

    • C. 

      Focus on own understanding of cultural identity

    • D. 

      Insist that members of minority groups ignore the dominant society.

  • 9. 
    Early studies of intercultural competence suggest that effectively working across cultures means that
    • A. 

      One can manage psychological stress.

    • B. 

      One is able to communicate effectively

    • C. 

      One can develop new and essential interpersonal relationships.

    • D. 

      All of the answers are correct.

  • 10. 
    All of the following are examples of interculturally competent skills, except
    • A. 

      The ability to be nonjudgmental

    • B. 

      The ability to interpret behavior from more than one perspective

    • C. 

      The ability to be intolerant of those who are different from oneself.

    • D. 

      The ability to mediate conflicts.

  • 11. 
    Bennett’s Developmental Model of Intercultural Sensitivity (DMIS) provides a continuum from
    • A. 

      Ethnocentric to ethnorelative development

    • B. 

      . individual to social development

    • C. 

      Insensitive to sensitive development

    • D. 

      None of the answers are correct.

  • 12. 
    According to Bennett, the inability or unwillingness to see cultural differences is called
    • A. 

      Defense.

    • B. 

      Minimization.

    • C. 

      Denial.

    • D. 

      Acceptance.

  • 13. 
    When one can accept superficial cultural differences but still assert that people are more alike than they are different, one is in the
    • A. 

      Denial stage of the DMIS

    • B. 

      Adaptation stage of the DMIS

    • C. 

      Minimization stage of the DMIS

    • D. 

      Acceptance stage of the DMIS.

  • 14. 
    When one can see cultural categories as flexible and becomes more competent in one’sability to communicate with those who are different from oneself, it can be said that one is in the stage of
    • A. 

      Adaptation.

    • B. 

      Acceptance.

    • C. 

      Integration.

    • D. 

      Minimization.

  • 15. 
    A somewhat romantic, but probably accurate, vision of the future holds that those who work to increase global understanding in the coming years will be
    • A. 

      Missionaries of the age.

    • B. 

      Soldiers of the future.

    • C. 

      Keepers of a just society.

    • D. 

      Prophets of the past.

  • 16. 
    The Banks model and the Cross-Spring model are very much alike.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 17. 
    In the Banks model, multi-ethnicity is a stage in which one has a healthy understanding of many groups and is well at home in a multicultural society.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 18. 
    The “defense” stage is characterized by recognition of cultural differences and negative evaluations of those who are different.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 19. 
    No one dies a natural death --there is always withcraft involved. This is a belief that can interfere with intercultural communication and cross-cultural understanding. It is an example of what Ting-Toomey calls ________________.
    • A. 

      Cognitve constraints

    • B. 

      Behavioral constraints

    • C. 

      Emotional constraints

  • 20. 
    All gaijin are hopeless barbarians. This is a belief that can interfere with intercultural communication and cross-cultural understanding. It is an example of what Ting- Toomey calls ________________.
    • A. 

      Cognitive constraints

    • B. 

      Behavioral constraints

    • C. 

      Emotional constraints

  • 21. 
    Eating with one's left hand is considered offensive in some cultures. This can interfere with intercultural communication and cross-cultural understanding. It is an example of what Ting-Toomey calls ________________.
    • A. 

      Cognitive constraints

    • B. 

      Behavioral constraints

    • C. 

      Emotional constraints

  • 22. 
    It is customary among the Fulani people to slap someone's back very hard in greeting. This can interfere with intercultural communication and cross-cultural understanding. It is an example of what Ting-Toomey calls ________________.
    • A. 

      Cognitive constraints

    • B. 

      Behavioral constraints

    • C. 

      Emotional constraints

  • 23. 
    In public settings, touch is often so rare as to be virtually non-existent. In one study which measured from, to whom, and where on the body touch was allowed, these Americans received less touch from mothers and other family members than other Americans received from casual acquaintances
    • A. 

      African Americans

    • B. 

      European Americans

    • C. 

      Asian Americans

    • D. 

      Hispanic Americans

    • E. 

      Native Americans

  • 24. 
    These Americans employ more physical touch among friends than some Americans do and less than that usually seen among other Americans
    • A. 

      African Americans

    • B. 

      European Americans

    • C. 

      Asian Americans

    • D. 

      Hispanic Americans

    • E. 

      Native Americans

  • 25. 
    Direct gaze to an elder or very respected person is often seen as especially rude among this group of Americans, unless one is in a formal listening/storytelling situation, in which case "listeners may look at (the speaker) more directly without violating his or her personal space by eye contact."
    • A. 

      African Americans

    • B. 

      European Americans

    • C. 

      Asian Americans

    • D. 

      Hispanic Americans

    • E. 

      Native Americans

  • 26. 
    It is always important to know one's status relative to the person one is speaking with among these Americans, so the proper forms of language and nonverbal communication can be used. Direct eye contact lasting longer than a second or two is avoided, especially with those thought to be of higher status to oneself in the hierarchy or with elders. To behave otherwise would be disrespectful.
    • A. 

      African Americans

    • B. 

      European Americans

    • C. 

      Asian Americans

    • D. 

      Hispanic Americans

    • E. 

      Native Americans

  • 27. 
    In low context cultures, time is open or polychronic. Polychronic time is multi-track circular; it allows many things to happen simultaneously, with no particular end in sight. Polychronic time is open-ended: completing the task or communication is more important than adhering to a schedule.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 28. 
    In high context cultures, time is closed or monchronic. Monochronic time is one-track linear: people do one thing at a time. Monochronic time is tightly compartmentalized: schedules are almost sacred.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 29. 
    In low context cultures, face is not as important therefore surface displays of reactions are often appropriate.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 30. 
    In high context cultures, a great deal of importance is placed on face [the value or standing you have in the eyes of others] or saving face. Saving face is thus preserving respect from your reference groups.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 31. 
    In high context cultures, there are extensive non-verbal cues which may accompany the spoken word. These cues which can include general appearance and dress, body movements, facial expressions, eye contact, touch, smell, paralanguage, space and distance, use of time, and silence contain meanings which can alter the spoken communication.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 32. 
    In high context cultures most information is in explicit code. The codes, e.g words, and phrases, are selected to convey meanings that are exactly what the words and phrases mean.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 33. 
    In high context cultures the messages are overt, out front. All the information is directly contained in what is said, and there is little or no implied meaning apart from the words that are being said.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False