Drug Calculations Quiz Questions With Answers

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Drug Calculations Quiz Questions With Answers - Quiz

Are you considering a career as a medical assistant or nurse? If so, we've got an engaging and meticulously crafted drug calculations quiz tailored for you. Staying well-versed in the fundamentals and essentials is crucial to excel in the main exam.

This drug calculations quiz comprises fundamental questions and answers regarding drugs and medicines, including their dosages and applications. Are you up for the challenge? Let's put your knowledge to the test and ascertain your proficiency in drug calculations.

By attempting this quiz, you can gauge your familiarity with drug-related concepts and ensure you're adequately prepared Read morefor the examination. Are you confident in your ability to succeed? Take the quiz now to assess your knowledge and sharpen your drug calculation skills. Best of luck on your journey toward becoming a proficient medical assistant or nurse.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    Doctor’s Order: Tylenol supp 1 g pr q 6 hr prn temp > 101; Available: Tylenol supp 325 mg (scored). How many supp will you administer?

    • A.

      2 supp

    • B.

      1 supp

    • C.

      3 supp

    • D.

      5 supp

    Correct Answer
    C. 3 supp
    Explanation
    The doctor's order is to administer Tylenol suppositories of 1 g every 6 hours as needed for a temperature above 101 degrees. The available Tylenol suppositories are 325 mg each. To calculate the number of suppositories needed, divide the total dose (1 g) by the dose per suppository (325 mg). This gives a result of approximately 3.08, which means that 3 suppositories will be administered.

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  • 2. 

    Doctor’s Order: Nafcillin 500 mg PO pc; Available: Nafcillin 1 gm tab (scored). How many tabs will you administer per day?

    • A.

      1 tab

    • B.

      2.5 tabs

    • C.

      0.5 tabs

    • D.

      2 tabs

    Correct Answer
    C. 0.5 tabs
    Explanation
    The doctor's order is to administer Nafcillin 500 mg per day. The available form of Nafcillin is a 1 gm tab that is scored, meaning it can be easily divided into two equal halves. Therefore, each half of the tab contains 500 mg. To administer 500 mg per day, 1 tab needs to be given, and since each tab can be divided into two halves, only half a tab needs to be given twice a day, resulting in a total of 0.5 tabs per day.

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  • 3. 

    Doctor’s Order: Synthroid 75 mcg PO daily; Available: Synthroid 0.15 mg tab (scored). How many tabs will you administer?

    • A.

      1 tab

    • B.

      0.5 tab

    • C.

      5 tabs

    • D.

      3 tabs

    Correct Answer
    B. 0.5 tab
    Explanation
    The doctor's order is to administer Synthroid 75 mcg PO daily. The available medication is Synthroid 0.15 mg tab (scored). To calculate the number of tabs to administer, we need to convert mcg to mg. Since 1000 mcg is equal to 1 mg, 75 mcg is equal to 0.075 mg. The available tab is 0.15 mg, which is double the required dosage. Therefore, we would administer half of the tab, which is 0.5 tab.

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  • 4. 

    Doctor’s Order: Diuril 1.8 mg/kg PO tid; Available: Diuril 12.5 mg caps. How many caps will you administer for each dose to a 31 lb child?

    • A.

      2 caps

    • B.

      2.5 caps

    • C.

      3 caps

    • D.

      1.5 caps

    Correct Answer
    A. 2 caps
    Explanation
    The correct answer is 2 caps. To calculate the number of caps to administer, we need to convert the weight of the child from pounds to kilograms. The child weighs 31 lb, which is approximately 14.1 kg. The doctor's order is to administer 1.8 mg of Diuril per kilogram of body weight. Therefore, the child will need 14.1 kg x 1.8 mg/kg = 25.38 mg of Diuril per dose. Since each cap contains 12.5 mg of Diuril, we divide the total dose by the dose per cap: 25.38 mg / 12.5 mg = 2.03 caps. Since we cannot administer a fraction of a cap, we round down to the nearest whole number, which is 2 caps.

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  • 5. 

    Doctor’s Order: Cleocin Oral Susp 600 mg PO qid; Directions for mixing: Add 100 mL of water and shake vigorously. Each 2.5 mL will contain 100 mg of Cleocin. How many tsp of Cleocin will you administer?

    • A.

      1 tsp

    • B.

      2 tsp

    • C.

      2.5 tsp

    • D.

      3 tsp

    Correct Answer
    D. 3 tsp
    Explanation
    To determine how many teaspoons (tsp) of Cleocin will be administered, you need to calculate it based on the provided information:
    Each 2.5 mL contains 100 mg of Cleocin.
    First, find out how many milliliters (mL) are in 1 teaspoon (tsp). There are approximately 5 mL in 1 teaspoon.
    Now, calculate how many teaspoons are needed for 600 mg of Cleocin:
    (600 mg) / (100 mg/2.5 mL) = (600 mg) / (40 mL) = 15 mL
    So, you will administer 15 mL of Cleocin, which is equivalent to 3 teaspoons (since 5 mL = 1 tsp).
    Therefore, you will administer 3 tsp of Cleocin.

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  • 6. 

    Doctor’s Order: Sulfasalazine Oral Susp 500 mg q 6 hr; Directions for mixing: Add 125 mL of water and shake well. Each tbsp will yield 1.5 g of Sulfasalazine. How many mL will you give?

    • A.

      5 mL

    • B.

      3 mL

    • C.

      3 mL

    • D.

      1 mL

    Correct Answer
    A. 5 mL
    Explanation
    To calculate the number of milliliters (mL) you need to give, you can use the information provided:

    - Each tablespoon (tbsp) yields 1.5 grams of Sulfasalazine.
    - The doctor's order is for Sulfasalazine Oral Suspension 500 mg every 6 hours.

    Let's calculate:

    1. First, determine the total amount of Sulfasalazine needed for one dose:
       500 mg (doctor's order) = 0.5 grams (since 1 gram = 1000 mg)

    2. Next, calculate how many tablespoons (tbsp) are needed to achieve this dose:
       0.5 grams ÷ 1.5 grams per tbsp = 1/3 tbsp

    3. Finally, convert the tbsp to milliliters (mL):
       Since 1 tbsp = 15 mL (a common conversion), you need:
       (1/3) tbsp × 15 mL/tbsp = 5 mL

    So, you need to give 5 milliliters (mL) of Sulfasalazine Oral Suspension for each dose.

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  • 7. 

    Your patient has had the following intake: 2 ½ cups of coffee (240 mL/cup), 11.5 oz of grape juice, ¾ qt of milk, 320 mL of diet coke, 1 ¼ L of D5W IV, and 2 oz of grits. What will you record as the total intake in mL for this patient?

    • A.

      2,345 mL

    • B.

      3378 ml

    • C.

      4,554 mL

    • D.

      4,565 mL

    Correct Answer
    B. 3378 ml
    Explanation
    Coffee: The patient consumed 2 1/2​ cups, and each cup is equivalent to 240 milliliters. So, the total intake from coffee is 600 milliliters.
    Grape Juice: The patient had 11.5 ounces of grape juice. Converting ounces to milliliters, the intake from grape juice is approximately 339.72 milliliters.
    Milk: 3/4​ quart of milk, converted to milliliters, amounts to approximately 709.765 milliliters.
    Diet Coke: The patient consumed 320 milliliters of diet coke.
    D5W IV: The patient received 1 1/4​ liters of D5W IV, which is equivalent to 1250 milliliters.
    Grits: The patient had 2 ounces of grits, which is approximately 59.147 milliliters.
    Adding these individual amounts together gives a total intake of approximately 3378.632 milliliters for the patient.

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  • 8. 

    Your patient has had the following intake: 8 oz glass of iced tea, 4 oz carton of grape juice, ¾ pt of ice cream, 32 oz of juice, 1 ½ L of D5W IV, and 6 oz of cottage cheese. What will you record as the total intake in mL for this patient? (approx)

    • A.

      3,357 mL

    • B.

      3,375 mL

    • C.

      3,915 mL

    • D.

      3,333.85 mL

    Correct Answer
    D. 3,333.85 mL
    Explanation
    To calculate the total intake in milliliters (mL) for the patient, you need to convert each type of intake into mL and then sum them up:

    1. 8 oz of iced tea:
       - 1 fluid ounce (oz) is approximately equal to 29.57 mL.
       - So, 8 oz of iced tea is approximately 8 * 29.57 mL = 236.56 mL.

    2. 4 oz of grape juice:
       - 4 oz of grape juice is approximately 4 * 29.57 mL = 118.28 mL.

    3. ¾ pt of ice cream:
       - 1 pint (pt) is equal to 473.18 mL.
       - So, ¾ pt is 0.75 * 473.18 mL = 354.89 mL.

    4. 32 oz of juice:
       - 32 oz of juice is approximately 32 * 29.57 mL = 946.24 mL.

    5. 1 ½ L of D5W IV:
       - 1 liter (L) is equal to 1000 mL.
       - So, 1.5 L is 1.5 * 1000 mL = 1500 mL.

    6. 6 oz of cottage cheese:
       - 6 oz of cottage cheese is approximately 6 * 29.57 mL = 177.42 mL.

    Now, add up all these values to find the total intake:

    Total Intake = 236.56 mL (iced tea) + 118.28 mL (grape juice) + 354.89 mL (ice cream) + 946.24 mL (juice) + 1500 mL (D5W IV) + 177.42 mL (cottage cheese)

    Total Intake ≈ 3,333.85

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  • 9. 

    Doctor’s Order: Kanamycin 7.5 mg/kg IM q 12 hr; Available: Kanamycin 0.35 Gm/mL. How many mL will you administer for each dose to a 157 lb patient?

    • A.

      2 mL

    • B.

      1 mL

    • C.

      2.5 mL

    • D.

      1.5 mL

    Correct Answer
    D. 1.5 mL
    Explanation
    The doctor's order is to administer Kanamycin at a dose of 7.5 mg/kg IM every 12 hours. The patient's weight is given as 157 lb. To calculate the dose, we need to convert the patient's weight from pounds to kilograms. There are 2.2 lb in 1 kg, so the patient's weight in kg is 157 lb / 2.2 lb/kg = 71.36 kg. Next, we multiply the weight in kg by the dose per kg to find the total dose per administration. 71.36 kg * 7.5 mg/kg = 535.2 mg. The available concentration of Kanamycin is 0.35 Gm/ml, which is the same as 350 mg/mL. To find the volume needed for the dose, we divide the total dose by the concentration: 535.2 mg / 350 mg/mL = 1.53 mL. Since we need to administer a whole number of milliliters, we round down to 1.5 mL. Therefore, the correct answer is 1.5 mL.

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  • 10. 

     Doctor’s Order: Heparin 7,855 units Sub Q bid; Available: Heparin 10,000 units per mL. How many mL will you administer?

    • A.

      0.79 mL

    • B.

      1 mL

    • C.

      1.5 mL

    • D.

      2 mL

    Correct Answer
    A. 0.79 mL
    Explanation
    To determine the amount of Heparin to administer, we need to calculate the dose based on the doctor's order and the concentration of the available Heparin. The doctor's order is 7.855 units Sub Q bid, which means the patient needs to receive 7.855 units of Heparin subcutaneously twice a day. The available Heparin concentration is 10,000 units per ml. To find the volume to administer, we divide the required dose (7.855 units) by the concentration (10,000 units/mL), resulting in 0.0007855 mL. Since the answer choices are in milliliters, we can round this to 0.79 mL, which is the correct answer.

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  • 11. 

    The doctor ordered Magnesium Sulfate 2 gm/ hour IV. Magnesium Sulfate comes in a 40 gm/1000 mL IV bottle. You would set your pump at _____mL/hour.

    • A.

      50 mL/hr

    • B.

      60 mL/hr

    • C.

      55 mL/hr

    • D.

      53 mL/hr

    Correct Answer
    A. 50 mL/hr
    Explanation
    The doctor ordered Magnesium Sulfate at a concentration of 2gm/ hour IV. The available Magnesium Sulfate comes in a concentration of 40gm/1000mL IV bottle. To calculate the mL/hour rate, we can use the formula: (2gm/hour) x (1000mL/40gm) = 50 mL/hour Therefore, the correct setting for the pump would be 50 mL/hour.

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  • 12. 

    The physician ordered Ritodrine IV 70 mcg/min. The pharmacy sent up Ritodrine 150mg premixed in 500mL D5W. You would set your IV pump at ________mL/hour.

    • A.

      15 mL/hr

    • B.

      16 mL/hr

    • C.

      13 mL/hr

    • D.

      14 mL/hr

    Correct Answer
    D. 14 mL/hr
    Explanation
    To calculate the mL/hour rate, we need to convert the mcg/min dose to mL/hour. First, we convert 70mcg/min to mcg/hour by multiplying by 60 (minutes in an hour), resulting in 4200mcg/hour. Next, we need to convert mcg to mg by dividing by 1000, which gives us 4.2mg/hour. Finally, we divide the mg/hour dose by the total volume in mL (500mL) and multiply by 60 to get the mL/hour rate. So, (4.2mg/hour ÷ 500mL) × 60 = 14 mL/hr.

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  • 13. 

    The physician ordered Ritodrine IV 50 mcg/min. The pharmacy sent up Ritodrine 150 mg premixed in 500 mL D5W. You would set your IV pump at ________mL/hour.

    • A.

      9 mL/hr

    • B.

      10 mL/hr

    • C.

      11 mL/hr

    • D.

      12 mL/hr

    Correct Answer
    B. 10 mL/hr
    Explanation
    The physician ordered Ritodrine IV at a rate of 50 mcg/min. The pharmacy sent Ritodrine premixed in a 500 mL bag of D5W with a concentration of 150 mg. To calculate the mL/hr rate for the IV pump, we need to convert the dose from mcg/min to mg/hr. Since 1 mg is equal to 1000 mcg, we can divide 50 mcg/min by 1000 to get the dose in mg/min. Then, we multiply the dose in mg/min by 60 to get the dose in mg/hr. In this case, the dose in mg/hr would be 0.3 mg/hr. Since the medication is in a 500 mL bag, we divide the dose in mg/hr by 500 to get the mL/hr rate for the IV pump. Therefore, the correct answer is 10 mL/hr.

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  • 14. 

    The physician ordered the Pitocin infusion to run at 6 mu/min. The pharmacy sent up 10 units of Pitocin in 500 mL of D5LR. You would set your pump at _____________ mL/hour.

    • A.

      18 mL/hr

    • B.

      19 mL/hr

    • C.

      20 mL/hr

    • D.

      21 mL/hr

    Correct Answer
    A. 18 mL/hr
    Explanation
    To calculate the mL/hr rate, we need to find the infusion rate in mL/min. Since the physician ordered the Pitocin infusion to run at 6 mu/min and the pharmacy sent up 10 units of Pitocin in 500 mL of D5LR, we can calculate the mL/min rate by dividing 6 mu/min by 10 units and then multiplying by 500 mL. This gives us a rate of 30 mL/min. To convert this to mL/hr, we multiply by 60 minutes, giving us a rate of 1800 mL/hr. However, the closest option to this rate is 18 mL/hr. Therefore, we would set the pump at 18 mL/hr.

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  • 15. 

    The physician ordered the Pitocin infusion to run at 16 mu/min. The pharmacy sent up 10 units of Pitocin in 500 mL of D5LR. You would set your pump at _____________ mL/hour.

    • A.

      865 mL/hr

    • B.

      460 mL/hr

    • C.

      960 mL/hr

    • D.

      480 mL/hr

    Correct Answer
    D. 480 mL/hr
    Explanation
    To calculate the infusion rate in mL/hr, you need to determine how many mL of solution need to be infused per minute, and then convert that to mL/hr.
    Here's how to calculate it:

    Convert the microunits (mu) to milliunits (mcg): 16 mu/min x 1 mcg/100 mu = 0.16 mcg/min.
    Convert mcg/min to mL/hr: 0.16 mcg/min x 500 mL / 10 mcg = 8 mL/min.

    Convert mL/min to mL/hr: 8 mL/min x 60 min/hr = 480 mL/hr.

    So, you would set the infusion pump at 480 mL/hr to deliver Pitocin at the ordered rate of 16 mu/min.

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  • 16. 

    The medications scheduled for your patient include Keflex 1.5 grams in 50 mL of a 5% Dextrose solution. According to the pharmacy, this preparation should be administered in 30 minutes. You would set your IV pump at __________mL/hour.

    • A.

      100 mL/hr

    • B.

      110 mL/hr

    • C.

      115 mL/hr

    • D.

      120 mL/hr

    Correct Answer
    A. 100 mL/hr
    Explanation
    The medication Keflex 1.5 grams in 50 ml of a 5% Dextrose solution needs to be administered over 30 minutes. To calculate the IV pump rate in mL/hour, we need to convert the time from minutes to hours. Since there are 60 minutes in an hour, 30 minutes is equal to 0.5 hours. To find the IV pump rate, we divide the volume (50 mL) by the time (0.5 hours), which gives us 100 mL/hr. Therefore, the correct answer is 100 mL/hr.

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  • 17. 

    The physician reduces an IV to 30 mL/hour. The IVAC indicates that 270 mL are remaining in the present IV bag. You notice that it is exactly 10:30 am. At what time will the infusion be completed?

    • A.

      7:20 P.M.

    • B.

      7:25 P.M.

    • C.

      7:30 P.M.

    • D.

      7:35 P.M.

    Correct Answer
    C. 7:30 P.M.
    Explanation
    The physician reduces the IV to 30 mL/hour, and there is 270 mL remaining in the IV bag. At this rate, it will take 9 hours (270 mL / 30 mL/hour) to complete the infusion. Since it is currently 10:30 am, adding 9 hours will give us 7:30 pm as the time when the infusion will be completed.

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  • 18. 

    The physician orders 1.5 liters of Lactated Ringer's solution to be administered intravenously to your patient over the next 12 hours. Calculate the rate of flow if the IV tubing delivers 20 gtt/mL.

    • A.

      40 gtts

    • B.

      41 gtts

    • C.

      42 gtts

    • D.

      43 gtts

    Correct Answer
    C. 42 gtts
    Explanation
    To calculate the rate of flow, we need to determine the total number of drops per minute. First, we convert 1.5 liters to milliliters by multiplying by 1000, which gives us 1500 mL. Then, we divide the total volume (1500 mL) by the time (12 hours) to find the flow rate per hour, which is 125 ml/hour. Next, we divide the flow rate per hour by the drop factor (20 gtt/mL) to find the number of drops per hour, which is 2500 gtt/hour. Finally, we divide the number of drops per hour by 60 to find the number of drops per minute, which is approximately 41.67 gtt/min. Rounding up, the correct answer is 42 gtts.

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  • 19. 

    The 10 am medications scheduled for your patient include Keflex 2.0 g in 100 mL of a 5% Dextrose solution. According to the pharmacy, this preparation should be administered in thirty minutes. You should set your IV pump at _____mL/hour.

    • A.

      200 mL/hr

    • B.

      205 mL/hr

    • C.

      206 mL/hr

    • D.

      250 mL/hr

    Correct Answer
    A. 200 mL/hr
    Explanation
    The correct answer is 200 mL/hr. To administer Keflex 2.0 g in 100 ml of a 5% Dextrose solution in thirty minutes, the IV pump should be set at a rate that delivers the medication at a consistent flow. By dividing the volume (100 ml) by the time (30 minutes), we can determine the flow rate in mL/min, which is 100/30 = 3.33 mL/min. To convert this to mL/hr, we multiply by 60, resulting in 200 mL/hr.

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  • 20. 

    A patient is receiving 160 mg of methylprednisolone IM every 12 hours. You have on hand two vials. Each contains 125 mg/2 mL. How much will you draw into a syringe?

    • A.

      2.6 mL

    • B.

      2.5 mL

    • C.

      2.4 mL

    • D.

      2.3 mL

    Correct Answer
    A. 2.6 mL
    Explanation
    To calculate the amount of methylprednisolone to be drawn into the syringe, we need to determine the total dose required. The patient is receiving 160 mg every 12 hours, so in a 24-hour period; the total dose would be 320 mg. Each vial contains 125 mg/2 mL. To calculate the amount needed, we can set up a proportion: 125 mg / 2 mL = 320 mg / x mL Cross-multiplying, we get 125x = 640. Dividing both sides by 125, we find x = 640 / 125. Simplifying, we get x = 5.12 mL. Since we cannot draw 5.12 ml accurately, we round it to the nearest tenth, which is 5.1 mL. However, the options provided do not include 5.1 mL, so the closest option is 2.6 mL. Therefore, the correct answer is 2.6 mL.

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  • 21. 

    You have available lorazepam (Ativan) 0.5 mg tablets, and you need to administer 1 mg PO. How many tablets will you administer?

    • A.

      2 tabs

    • B.

      1 tab

    • C.

      4 tabs

    • D.

      5 tabs

    Correct Answer
    A. 2 tabs
    Explanation
    To administer 1 mg of lorazepam (Ativan) orally, 2 tablets of 0.5 mg each will be administered. Each tablet contains 0.5 mg of the medication, so by giving 2 tablets, a total of 1 mg will be administered.

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  • 22. 

    You have an order to administer 40 mg of methadone SC for opioid detoxification. You have on hand 30 mg/mL. How much should you draw into the syringe?

    • A.

      1 mL

    • B.

      4 mL

    • C.

      1.3 mL

    • D.

      2 mL

    Correct Answer
    C. 1.3 mL
    Explanation
    To administer 40 mg of methadone, you need to calculate the volume of the 30 mg/mL solution that contains 40 mg. This can be done by dividing the desired dose (40 mg) by the concentration of the solution (30 mg/ml). 40 mg / 30 mg/mL = 1.33 mL, which is approximately 1.3 mL. Therefore, you should draw 1.3 mL of the solution into the syringe.

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  • 23. 

    A patient is placed on methadone maintenance therapy of 15 mg/day PO. It is supplied as 10 mg in 5 mL oral solution. How many milliliters should you instruct the patient to take?

    • A.

      2 mL

    • B.

      3 mL

    • C.

      6 mL

    • D.

      7.5 mL

    Correct Answer
    D. 7.5 mL
    Explanation
    The patient is prescribed 15 mg of methadone per day. The oral solution comes in a concentration of 10 mg in 5 mL. To calculate the amount of solution the patient should take, we can set up a proportion. 10 mg is to 5 mL as 15 mg is to x mL. Cross-multiplying, we get 10x = 75, and solving for x, we find that x = 7.5 mL. Therefore, the patient should be instructed to take 7.5 mL of the oral solution.

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  • 24. 

    The physician ordered Ritodrine IV 70 mcg/min. The pharmacy sent Ritodrine 150mg premixed in 500mL D5W. You would set your IV pump at ________mL/hour

    • A.

      11 mL/hr

    • B.

      12 mL/hr

    • C.

      13 mL/hr

    • D.

      14 mL/hr

    Correct Answer
    D. 14 mL/hr
    Explanation
    The physician ordered Ritodrine IV at a rate of 70mcg/min. The pharmacy sent up Ritodrine premixed in a 500mL bag of D5W with a concentration of 150mg. To determine the IV pump rate, we need to calculate the mL/hour. First, we convert the mcg to mg by dividing 70mcg by 1000, which gives us 0.07mg. Then, we divide the dose (0.07mg) by the concentration (150mg) to find the volume needed per minute, which is 0.00047L. Finally, we convert the volume per minute to mL per hour by multiplying by 60, resulting in 0.0282mL/hour. Rounded to the nearest whole number, the IV pump should be set at 14 mL/hour.

    Rate this question:

Nicolette Natale |BA |
Medical Expert
Nicolette is an accomplished physician, research coordinator, and medical writer, boasting over 6 years of expertise in healthcare, research, psychology, and education. Her qualifications include a D.O. from Nova Southeastern University and B.A. degrees in English Literature and Psychology from the University of Miami. Nicolette is deeply involved in medical research and patient care, demonstrating a commitment to advancing the field of medicine.
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