Critical Thinking Skills Presentation Quiz

20 Questions

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Critical Thinking Quizzes & Trivia

After watching the Critical Thinking Skills Presentation, viewer should be able to answer the following questions which will test their understanding of the material.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Please describe how critical thinking can benefit us in everyday life; give at least 3 examples.
  • 2. 
    We learned that logical relationships and inferences should be based on reasonable facts.  Based on this idea, please explain why the "deductions" made in the Monty Python video clip were faulty.
  • 3. 
  • 4. 
    Briefly describe the difference between Facts and Opinions.
  • 5. 
    Which of the statements completes this definition.Critical Thinking is ___________________________________________.
    • A. 

      thinking which involves or exercises skilled judgment or observation or evaluative thinking

    • B. 

      A general term given to a wide range of cognitive skills and intellectual dispositions

    • C. 

      Negative or fault-finding

    • D. 

      A and B

    • E. 

      None of the above

  • 6. 
    Which of these is NOT involved in critical thinking:
    • A. 

      Analyzing assumptions and biases

    • B. 

      Examining evidence

    • C. 

      Defining a problem

    • D. 

      Intolerance of ambiguity

    • E. 

      Disciplined thinking

  • 7. 
    Which of the following traits is important to critical thinking?
    • A. 

      Accuracy

    • B. 

      Clarity

    • C. 

      Relevancy

    • D. 

      Logical consistency

    • E. 

      All are important

  • 8. 
    ___________________   thinking  is believing something is true because one wishes it were true.
  • 9. 
    "Who’s to say what’s moral or immoral?  It's up to the individual or the culture to decide."This is an example of __________________________ Thinking.
  • 10. 
    Choose the best answer to fill in the blank: ______________________________ can be seen as self-centered thinking or self-interested thinking
    • A. 

      Sociocentrism

    • B. 

      Egocentrism

    • C. 

      Wishful Thinking

    • D. 

      Unwarranted assumptions

    • E. 

      Relativistic thinking

  • 11. 
    Choose the best answer to fill in the blank:_________________________  is group-centered thinking; group bias or conformism.
    • A. 

      Unwarranted assumptions

    • B. 

      Egocentrism

    • C. 

      Relativistic thinking

    • D. 

      Sociocentrism

    • E. 

      Wishful Thinking

  • 12. 
    Suzie: I can't believe I got a B- on this marketing paper. My friend Sarah turned in this same paper in a different marketing class last semester, and she got an A.Ali: Don't you realize it's wrong to plagiarize someone else's work?Suzie: That's your opinion. What's wrong for one person isn't necessarily wrong for another, and I say there's nothing wrong with plagiarism-as long as you don't get caught.Which critical thinking barrier does Suzie exhibit?
    • A. 

      Stereotyping

    • B. 

      Wishful thinking

    • C. 

      Relativistic thinking

    • D. 

      Unwarranted assumptions

    • E. 

      All of the above

  • 13. 
    Is this statement True or False:"Assumptions are unnecessary and useless"?
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 14. 
    Which of these is NOT a good definition of being skeptical?
    • A. 

      Doubting

    • B. 

      Indiscriminately rejecting ideas

    • C. 

      Suspending judgment

    • D. 

      Accepting only justified claims

    • E. 

      All of the above are good definitions of skepticism

  • 15. 
    • A. 

      Value stereotypes, respect precision, look for evidence, and look for logical explanations

    • B. 

      View phenomena with disbelief and bias

    • C. 

      Are open-minded, value fair-mindedness, respect evidence and reasoning, respect clarity and precision

    • D. 

      identify and evaluate arguments, ignore criteria, and apply reasoning

    • E. 

      All of the above are accurate

  • 16. 
    Which of these is NOT a procedure for Applying Criteria?
    • A. 

      Asking questions

    • B. 

      Making judgments

    • C. 

      Identifying assumptions

    • D. 

      Eliminating ALL opinions

    • E. 

      All of the above are procedures for applying criteria.

  • 17. 
    Which of these is NOT a barrier to critical thought?
    • A. 

      Poor reading skills

    • B. 

      Poor listening skills

    • C. 

      Prejudice

    • D. 

      Bias

    • E. 

      Acceptance of change

  • 18. 
    Unwarranted assumptions are beliefs that are learned or presumed to be true without adequate evidence or justification.  What is a common example of unwarranted assumptions?
    • A. 

      Logical reasoning

    • B. 

      Conformism

    • C. 

      Black-and-white thinking

    • D. 

      Stereotyping

    • E. 

      Wishful thinking

  • 19. 
    Why is it important that we, as tutors, help students learn HOW to think instead of just WHAT to think?
    • A. 

      Nearly 40 percent of 17-year-olds cannot draw inferences from written material.

    • B. 

      Only one-third of high-school graduates can solve a mathematics problem requiring several steps..

    • C. 

      Acquisition of scientific facts and information often takes precedence over learning scientific methods and concepts in the classroom.

    • D. 

      When the information content of a discipline increases, it becomes even more vital to spend time, not learning more information, but when the information content of a discipline increases, it becomes even more vital to spend time learning methods to acquire, understand, and evaluate this information

    • E. 

      All of the above are reasons to model critical thinking.

  • 20. 
    • A. 

      Don’t automatically answer questions the student has. Instead, whenever possible, turn the question back to the student. Ask questions like: What do you think? What ideas do you have about that? What has been your experience?

    • B. 

      Help students talk through problems. Encourage them to think out loud and model this yourself by vocalizing your own thought processes, trying to implement specific reasoning skills as you do so.

    • C. 

      Shorten your response time. Remember that it takes time to think and students may be anxious, particularly if they feel they are put on-the-spot,causing them to think harder.

    • D. 

      Have students analyze their own work, looking for patterns in their thinking and in their mistakes.

    • E. 

      Encourage students to see the problem, situation, or concept from a different viewpoint. If working on a math problem, for example, ask the student if he or she can think of another way to solve the problem.