Comarts 1 Quiz- Reading Comprehension

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| By Pete Caudilla
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Pete Caudilla
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Comarts 1 Quiz- Reading Comprehension - Quiz

This quiz contains reading passages that focus on various manifestations of reading comprehension. It consists of three selections and 15 questions intended to measure your literal, inferential, and critical level of understanding. Read each passage carefully. Then tick the box corresponding to the letter of the best answer among the alternatives. Good luck.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    Read the passage that follows.Mark Rothko Mark Rothko, one of the greatest painters of the twentieth century, was born in Daugavpils, Latvia in 1903. His father emigrated to the United States, afraid that his sons would be drafted into the Czarist army. Mark stayed in Russia with his mother and older sister; they joined the family later, arriving in the winter of 1913, after a 12-day voyage. Mark moved to New York in the autumn of 1923 and found employment in the garment trade and took up residence on the Upper West Side. It was while he was visiting someone at the Art Students League that he saw students sketching a nude model. According to him, this was the start of his life as an artist. He was twenty years old and had taken some art lessons at school, so his initial experience was far from an immediate calling. In 1936, Mark Rothko began writing a book, which he never completed, about the similarities in the children's art and the work of modern painters. The work of modernists, which was influenced by primitive art, could, according to him, be compared to that of children in that "child art transforms itself into primitivism, which is only the child producing a mimicry of himself." In this same work, he said that "the fact that one usually begins with drawing is already academic. We start with colour." It was not long before his multiforms developed into the style he is remembered for; in 1949 Rothko exhibited these new works at the Betty Parsons Gallery. For critic Harold Rosenberg, the paintings were a revelation. Rothko had, after painting his first multiform, secluded himself to his home in East Hampton on Long Island, only inviting a very few people, including Rosenberg, to view the new paintings. The discovery of his definitive form came at a period of great grief; his mother Kate died in October 1948 and it was at some point during that winter that Rothko chanced upon the striking symmetrical rectangular blocks of two to three opposing or contrasting, yet complementary colours. As part of this new uniformity of artistic vision, his paintings and drawings no longer had individual titles; from this point on they were simply untitled, numbered or dated.  However, to assist in distinguishing one work from another, dealers would sometimes add the primary colours to the name. Additionally, for the next few years, Rothko painted in oil only on large vertical canvasses. This was done to overwhelm the viewer, or, in his words, to make the viewer feel enveloped within the picture. On February 25, 1970, Oliver Steindecker, Rothko’s assistant, found him in his kitchen, lying on the floor in front of the sink, covered in blood. His arms had been cut open with a razor. The emergency doctor arrived on the scene minutes later to pronounce him dead as the result of suicide; it was discovered during the autopsy that he had also overdosed on anti-depressants. He was just 66 years old.Answer the following questions. 1. Mark Rothko emigrated to the United States

    • A.

      With his father and elder sister.

    • B.

      With his mother and brothers.

    • C.

      With his mother and elder sister.

    • D.

      With all his family.

    Correct Answer
    C. With his mother and elder sister.
    Explanation
    Mark Rothko emigrated to the United States with his mother and elder sister. His father had already emigrated to the United States out of fear that his sons would be drafted into the Czarist army. Mark and his mother and sister joined the family later, arriving in the winter of 1913.

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  • 2. 

    Rothko wanted to be an artist

    • A.

      From his early childhood.

    • B.

      When he joined the Art Students League.

    • C.

      When he watched students drawing.

    • D.

      When he moved to the Upper West Side.

    Correct Answer
    C. When he watched students drawing.
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "when he watched students drawing." This can be inferred from the statement "Rothko wanted to be an artist from his early childhood." Watching other students drawing would have likely inspired Rothko and further fueled his desire to become an artist himself.

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  • 3. 

    Rothko thought that modern art

    • A.

      Was primitive.

    • B.

      Could be compared to children's pictures.

    • C.

      Was already academic.

    • D.

      Was childish.

    Correct Answer
    B. Could be compared to children's pictures.
    Explanation
    Rothko believed that modern art could be compared to children's pictures. This suggests that he saw a similarity between the simplicity and innocence of children's artwork and the abstract nature of modern art. By making this comparison, Rothko may have been highlighting the pure and unfiltered expression found in both forms of art, suggesting that they both possess a certain authenticity and emotional depth.

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  • 4. 

    Rothko's distinctive style

    • A.

      Was inspired by Rosenberg.

    • B.

      Resulted from moving to Long Island.

    • C.

      Resulted from his grief.

    • D.

      Evolved in 1948.

    Correct Answer
    D. Evolved in 1948.
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "evolved in 1948." This suggests that Rothko's distinctive style developed or changed in some way in the year 1948. The other options do not provide a specific time frame or explanation for the evolution of his style.

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  • 5. 

    Who named paintings by their colours?

    • A.

      Rosenberg

    • B.

      Rothko

    • C.

      Dealers

    • D.

      Steindecker

    Correct Answer
    C. Dealers
    Explanation
    Dealers named paintings by their colors. This suggests that it was common practice for art dealers to assign names to paintings based on the predominant colors used in the artwork. This could have been done to make it easier for potential buyers to identify and remember the paintings, or to create a sense of uniqueness and marketability for each artwork. While the other options mentioned (Rosenberg, Rothko, and Steindecker) are individuals who may have had some involvement in the art world, there is no specific information to suggest that they were responsible for naming paintings by their colors.

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  • 6. 

    Read the passage that follows.The Great Wall of China Walls and wall building have played a very important role in Chinese culture. These people, from the dim mists of prehistory have been wall-conscious; from the Neolithic period – when ramparts of pounded earth were used - to the Communist Revolution, walls were an essential part of any village. Not only towns and villages; the houses and the temples within them were somehow walled, and the houses also had no windows overlooking the street, thus giving the feeling of wandering around a huge maze. The name for “city” in Chinese (ch’eng) means wall, and over these walled cities, villages, houses and temples presides the god of walls and mounts, whose duties were, and still are, to protect and be responsible for the welfare of the inhabitants. Thus a great and extremely laborious task such as constructing a wall, which was supposed to run throughout the country, must not have seemed such an absurdity.However, it is indeed a common mistake to perceive the Great Wall as a single architectural structure, and it would also be erroneous to assume that it was built during a single dynasty. For the building of the wall spanned the various dynasties, and each of these dynasties somehow contributed to the refurbishing and the construction of a wall, whose foundations had been laid many centuries ago. It was during the fourth and third century B.C. that each warring state started building walls to protect their kingdoms, both against one another and against the northern nomads. Especially three of these states: the Ch’in, the Chao and the Yen, corresponding respectively to the modern provinces of Shensi, Shanzi and Hopei, over and above building walls that surrounded their kingdoms, also laid the foundations on which Ch’in Shih Huang Di would build his first continuous Great Wall.The role that the Great Wall played in the growth of Chinese economy was an important one. Throughout the centuries many settlements were established along the new border. The garrison troops were instructed to reclaim wasteland and to plant crops on it, roads and canals were built, to mention just a few of the works carried out. All these undertakings greatly helped to increase the country’s trade and cultural exchanges with many remote areas and also with the southern, central and western parts of Asia – the formation of the Silk Route. Builders, garrisons, artisans, farmers and peasants left behind a trail of objects, including inscribed tablets, household articles, and written work, which have become extremely valuable archaeological evidence to the study of defense institutions of the Great Wall and the everyday life of these people who lived and died along the wall. Answer the following questions. 6. Chinese cities resembled a maze

    • A.

      Because they were walled.

    • B.

      Because the houses has no external windows.

    • C.

      Because the name for cities means 'wall'.

    • D.

      Because walls have always been important there.

    Correct Answer
    B. Because the houses has no external windows.
    Explanation
    Chinese cities resembled a maze because the houses had no external windows. The passage states that the houses in Chinese cities were somehow walled and did not have windows overlooking the street. This created a feeling of wandering around a huge maze. The absence of external windows contributed to the maze-like structure of the cities.

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  • 7. 

    Constructing a wall that ran the length of the country

    • A.

      Honoured the god of walls and mounts.

    • B.

      Was an absurdly laborious task.

    • C.

      May have made sense within Chinese culture.

    • D.

      Made the country look like a huge maze.

    Correct Answer
    C. May have made sense within Chinese culture.
    Explanation
    The construction of a wall that ran the length of the country may have made sense within Chinese culture. China has a long history of valuing and prioritizing the defense of its borders. Building a wall would demonstrate the country's commitment to protecting its territory and people. Additionally, Chinese culture places importance on the idea of unity and collective effort, so undertaking a laborious task like building a wall could be seen as a symbol of national unity and strength.

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  • 8. 

    The Great Wall of China

    • A.

      Was built in a single dynasty.

    • B.

      Was refurbished in the fourth and third centuries BC.

    • C.

      Used existing foundations.

    • D.

      Was built by the Ch’in, the Chao and the Yen.

    Correct Answer
    C. Used existing foundations.
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "used existing foundations." This means that when the Great Wall of China was built, it utilized pre-existing foundations or structures. This suggests that the builders of the wall did not start from scratch but instead incorporated existing structures into the construction process. This approach would have saved time, effort, and resources, making the building process more efficient.

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  • 9. 

    Crops were planted

    • A.

      On wasteland.

    • B.

      To reclaim wasteland.

    • C.

      On reclaimed wasteland.

    • D.

      Along the canals.

    Correct Answer
    C. On reclaimed wasteland.
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "on reclaimed wasteland." This means that the crops were planted on land that was previously considered wasteland but has been restored or reclaimed for agricultural purposes.

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  • 10. 

    The Great Wall

    • A.

      Helped build trade only inside China.

    • B.

      Helped build trade in China and abroad.

    • C.

      Helped build trade only abroad.

    • D.

      Helped build trade only to remote areas.

    Correct Answer
    B. Helped build trade in China and abroad.
    Explanation
    The Great Wall of China played a crucial role in facilitating trade both within China and with other countries. It served as a barrier against invasions, ensuring the safety of trade routes and encouraging economic exchanges between different regions within China. Additionally, the wall also acted as a symbol of China's power and grandeur, attracting foreign traders and boosting international trade. Therefore, the Great Wall helped build trade in China and abroad.

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  • 11. 

    Read the passage that follows.Dirty Britain Before the grass has thickened on the roadside verges and leaves have started growing on the trees is a perfect time to look around and see just how dirty Britain has become. The pavements are stained with chewing gum that has been spat out and the gutters are full of discarded fast food cartons. Years ago I remember travelling abroad and being saddened by the plastic bags, discarded bottles and soiled nappies at the edge of every road. Nowadays, Britain seems to look at least as bad. What has gone wrong? The problem is that the rubbish created by our increasingly mobile lives lasts a lot longer than before. If it is not cleared up and properly thrown away, it stays in the undergrowth for years; a semi-permanent reminder of what a tatty little country we have now. Firstly, it is estimated that 10 billion plastic bags have been given to shoppers. These will take anything from 100 to 1,000 years to rot. However, it is not as if there is no solution to this. A few years ago, the Irish government introduced a tax on non-recyclable carrier bags and in three months reduced their use by 90%. When he was a minister, Michael Meacher attempted to introduce a similar arrangement in Britain. The plastics industry protested, of course. However, they need not have bothered; the idea was killed before it could draw breath, leaving supermarkets free to give away plastic bags. What is clearly necessary right now is some sort of combined initiative, both individual and collective, before it is too late. The alternative is to continue sliding downhill until we have a country that looks like a vast municipal rubbish tip. We may well be at the tipping point. Yet we know that people respond to their environment. If things around them are clean and tidy, people behave cleanly and tidily. If they are surrounded by squalor, they behave squalidly. Now, much of Britain looks pretty squalid. What will it look like in five years? Answer the following questions. The writer says that it is a good time to see Britain before the trees have leaves because

    • A.

      Britain looks perfect.

    • B.

      You can see Britain at its dirtiest.

    • C.

      You can see how dirty Britain is now.

    • D.

      The grass has thickened on the verges.

    Correct Answer
    C. You can see how dirty Britain is now.
    Explanation
    The writer suggests that it is a good time to see Britain before the trees have leaves because it allows people to see how dirty Britain has become. The passage describes the pavements stained with chewing gum and the gutters full of discarded fast food cartons. The writer also compares the current state of Britain with their memories of travelling abroad and seeing similar levels of litter. Therefore, the correct answer is "you can see how dirty Britain is now."

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  • 12. 

    According to the writer, things used to be

    • A.

      Worse abroad.

    • B.

      The same abroad.

    • C.

      Better abroad.

    • D.

      Worse, but now things are better abroad.

    Correct Answer
    A. Worse abroad.
    Explanation
    The writer suggests that things used to be worse abroad. This implies that the conditions or situations in other countries were more unfavorable or challenging in the past compared to the present. The writer might be referring to various aspects such as living standards, economic conditions, social issues, or any other relevant factors. However, without further context or details, it is difficult to determine the specific areas in which things were worse abroad.

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  • 13. 

    For the writer, the problem is that

    • A.

      Rubbish is not cleared up.

    • B.

      Rubbish last longer than it used to.

    • C.

      Our society is increasingly mobile.

    • D.

      Britain is a tatty country.

    Correct Answer
    B. Rubbish last longer than it used to.
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "rubbish last longer than it used to." This suggests that the writer's problem is related to the fact that rubbish takes longer to decompose or be cleared up compared to the past. This could be a concern for the writer as it may contribute to environmental pollution, health hazards, or an overall decline in the cleanliness of the surroundings.

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  • 14. 

    Michael Meacher

    • A.

      Followed the Irish example with a tax on plastic bags.

    • B.

      Tried to follow the Irish example with a tax on plastic bags.

    • C.

      Made no attempt to follow the Irish example with a tax on plastic bags.

    • D.

      Had problems with the plastics industry who weren't bothered about the tax.

    Correct Answer
    B. Tried to follow the Irish example with a tax on plastic bags.
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "tried to follow the Irish example with a tax on plastic bags." This is evident from the statement that Michael Meacher "followed the Irish example with a tax on plastic bags." It suggests that Michael Meacher attempted to implement a similar tax on plastic bags as the Irish government did.

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  • 15. 

    The writer thinks

    • A.

      It is too late to do anything.

    • B.

      We are at the tipping point.

    • C.

      There is no alternative.

    • D.

      We need to work together to solve the problem.

    Correct Answer
    D. We need to work together to solve the problem.
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "we need to work together to solve the problem." This answer suggests that the writer believes that collective action is necessary to address the problem at hand. It implies that individual efforts alone may not be sufficient to solve the problem and emphasizes the importance of collaboration and cooperation among different stakeholders.

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  • Current Version
  • Oct 09, 2023
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team
  • May 24, 2010
    Quiz Created by
    Pete Caudilla
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