Chapter 7 Rippee 2nd

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Chapter 7 Rippee 2nd - Quiz

Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    Which of these was NOT part of the Reagan White House’s strategies for news management?

    • A. 

      Allow the press unlimited access to the president

    • B. 

      Plan ahead

    • C. 

      Stay on the offensive

    • D. 

      Repeat the same message many times

    • E. 

      Speak in one voice

    Correct Answer
    A. Allow the press unlimited access to the president
    Explanation
    The Reagan White House's strategies for news management included planning ahead, staying on the offensive, repeating the same message many times, and speaking in one voice. However, allowing the press unlimited access to the president was not part of their strategies. This suggests that the Reagan administration sought to control and manage the flow of information to the press and the public, rather than providing unrestricted access.

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  • 2. 

    Which president held one thousand press conferences, far more than any other?

    • A. 

      John F. Kennedy b. c. d. e.

    • B. 

      Richard Nixon

    • C. 

      Ronald Reagan

    • D. 

      Franklin Roosevelt

    • E. 

      Bill Clinton

    Correct Answer
    D. Franklin Roosevelt
    Explanation
    Franklin Roosevelt held one thousand press conferences, which is more than any other president. This suggests that he was highly accessible to the press and valued open communication with the public. This level of engagement with the media may have allowed him to effectively communicate his policies and initiatives to the American people during a time of crisis, such as the Great Depression and World War II.

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  • 3. 

     One president who was particularly successful in playing to the media was

    • A. 

      George H. W. Bush

    • B. 

      Ronald Reagan

    • C. 

      Richard Nixon

    • D. 

      Jimmy Carter

    • E. 

      Thomas Jefferson

    Correct Answer
    B. Ronald Reagan
    Explanation
    Ronald Reagan was particularly successful in playing to the media because he was a skilled communicator and actor. He had experience in the entertainment industry, which allowed him to deliver speeches and engage with the media in a charismatic and persuasive manner. Reagan utilized his acting skills to effectively convey his messages and connect with the American public. He understood the power of the media and used it to his advantage, effectively shaping public opinion and garnering support for his policies and initiatives.

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  • 4. 

    The cozy relationship between politicians and the press in the twentieth century lasted until

    • A. 

      The Iranian Hostage Crisis

    • B. 

      World War II

    • C. 

      The commercialization of television

    • D. 

      The beginning of Franklin Roosevelt's presidency

    • E. 

      The Vietnam War and Watergate

    Correct Answer
    E. The Vietnam War and Watergate
    Explanation
    The cozy relationship between politicians and the press in the twentieth century lasted until the Vietnam War and Watergate. These two events significantly changed the dynamics between politicians and the press. The Vietnam War was a highly controversial conflict, and the press coverage played a crucial role in shaping public opinion and exposing government lies. Watergate, on the other hand, was a major political scandal that led to the resignation of President Nixon. The press played a vital role in investigating and reporting on the Watergate scandal, leading to a loss of trust and a more adversarial relationship between politicians and the press.

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  • 5. 

    The use of detective-like reporting methods to unearth scandals is known as

    • A. 

      Yellow journalism

    • B. 

      Trial balloons

    • C. 

      Scientific journalism

    • D. 

      Investigative journalism

    • E. 

      Print journalism

    Correct Answer
    D. Investigative journalism
    Explanation
    Investigative journalism refers to the practice of using detective-like reporting methods to uncover scandals and expose wrongdoing. This type of journalism involves in-depth research, interviews, and analysis to bring hidden information to light. It often involves extensive digging into public records, conducting interviews with sources, and analyzing data to reveal the truth behind a story. Investigative journalism plays a crucial role in holding those in power accountable and bringing important issues to the public's attention.

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  • 6. 

    The nation's most influential newspaper and its unofficial "newspaper of record" is

    • A. 

      USA Today

    • B. 

      The New York Times

    • C. 

      The Wall Street Journal

    • D. 

      Congressional Quarterly

    • E. 

      The Washington Post

    Correct Answer
    B. The New York Times
    Explanation
    The New York Times is considered the nation's most influential newspaper and its unofficial "newspaper of record" due to its long-standing reputation for delivering high-quality journalism and comprehensive coverage of national and international news. It has a large readership and is widely respected for its investigative reporting, in-depth analysis, and editorial integrity. The New York Times has consistently set the standard for journalism excellence and has had a significant impact on shaping public opinion and influencing policy decisions in the United States.

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  • 7. 

    In a famous, televised speech in 1952 to save his vice presidential candidacy, ________ denied having received illegal gifts and payments, and declared that the family dog, Checkers, though a gift, would not be returned.

    • A. 

      John Sparkman

    • B. 

      Richard Nixon

    • C. 

      Lyndon Johnson

    • D. 

      Spiro Agnew

    • E. 

      Dwight Eisenhower

    Correct Answer
    B. Richard Nixon
    Explanation
    In 1952, Richard Nixon gave a televised speech to defend his vice presidential candidacy. In this speech, he denied allegations of receiving illegal gifts and payments. He also mentioned that even though his family had received a dog named Checkers as a gift, they would not be returning it. This speech became known as the "Checkers speech" and is considered a pivotal moment in Nixon's political career.

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  • 8. 

    Following the first Nixon-Kennedy presidential debate of 1960, opinion polls showed that

    • A. 

      Those who watched on television thought Nixon had won, while those who listened overthe radio thought Kennedy won.

    • B. 

      Those who watched on television and listened over the radio both thought Kennedy had won.

    • C. 

      Those who listened over radio thought it was a draw, while those who watched television thought Kennedy did better

    • D. 

      Those who watched on television and listened over the radio both thought Nixon had won.

    • E. 

      Those who watched on television thought Kennedy had won, while those who listened over the radio thought Nixon won.

    Correct Answer
    E. Those who watched on television thought Kennedy had won, while those who listened over the radio thought Nixon won.
    Explanation
    This answer suggests that the perception of who won the debate differed depending on the medium through which it was experienced. Those who watched on television believed Kennedy had won, while those who listened over the radio believed Nixon had won. This indicates that the visual aspect of the debate may have influenced viewers' opinions in favor of Kennedy, while those who only heard the audio may have focused more on the content of the debate and believed Nixon performed better.

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  • 9. 

    In 1934, Congress created the ______________ to regulate the use of the airwaves

    • A. 

      Federal Trade Commission

    • B. 

      Equal Opportunity Commission

    • C. 

      Federal Communications Commission

    • D. 

      Department of the Interior

    • E. 

      Department of Media Communications

    Correct Answer
    C. Federal Communications Commission
    Explanation
    The correct answer is the Federal Communications Commission. In 1934, Congress established the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to oversee and regulate the use of the airwaves. The FCC's primary responsibility is to ensure that radio, television, wire, satellite, and cable communications operate in the public interest. It sets rules and regulations regarding broadcasting, licensing, spectrum allocation, and telecommunications infrastructure. The FCC plays a crucial role in promoting competition, protecting consumers, and fostering innovation in the communications industry.

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  • 10. 

    An intentional news leak for the purpose of assessing the political reaction to that news is called

    • A. 

      A talking head

    • B. 

      A press conference.

    • C. 

      A media event

    • D. 

      A trial balloon

    • E. 

      Investigative journalism

    Correct Answer
    D. A trial balloon
    Explanation
    A trial balloon refers to an intentional news leak made to gauge the political response to that news. It is a strategic tactic used by politicians or organizations to test public opinion or assess potential backlash before making a formal announcement or decision. By leaking information and observing the reaction, they can adjust their plans accordingly. This allows them to gather valuable insights and make informed decisions based on public perception and political climate.

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