Chapter 7: Forgetting (Grivas)

10 Questions | Total Attempts: 258

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Educational Psychology Quizzes & Trivia

Unit 3 exam prep.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Anything that assists recovery of information stored in LTM is called a ______ cue.
    • A. 

      Retrieval

    • B. 

      Recovery

    • C. 

      Trace

    • D. 

      Trace-dependent

  • 2. 
    Which measure of retention is the most sensitive?
    • A. 

      Cued recall

    • B. 

      Free recall

    • C. 

      Recognition

    • D. 

      Relearning

  • 3. 
    In an experiment on forgetting, adolescent participants were required to memorise a long list of dates (for example, 1/10/22, 25/2/31, etc.) They were then regularly tested on retention over a period of several weeks. In general, the forgetting curve for this experiment is likely to show that participants forgot
    • A. 

      About half of the dates within the first 10 minutes of learning.

    • B. 

      About half of the dates within the first hour of learning.

    • C. 

      Slowly at first, with a gradual increase as time passed.

    • D. 

      At a slow, steady rate.

  • 4. 
    When old learning interferes with the ability to learn something new it is called
    • A. 

      Retrieval failure.

    • B. 

      Lack of rehearsal.

    • C. 

      Retroactive interference.

    • D. 

      Proactive interference.

  • 5. 
    Repression is said to involve ______, whereas suppression is said to involve ______.
    • A. 

      Psychology factors; decay factors

    • B. 

      Material lost from memory; material that can be retrieved from memory

    • C. 

      Unconsciously blocking a memory from entering conscious awareness; consciously blocking a memory from entering conscious awareness

    • D. 

      Consciously blocking a memory from entering conscious awareness; unconsciously blocking a memory from entering conscious awareness

  • 6. 
    Forgetting as a result of retrieval failure occurs when
    • A. 

      We are in the same psychological state as the one we were in when we learned the information.

    • B. 

      We fail to use the correct cue to locate and recover information.

    • C. 

      Old information interferes with our ability to recall new information.

    • D. 

      The memory trace is ineffective.

  • 7. 
    Decay theory suggests that memory loss occurs because
    • A. 

      A memory has not been formed.

    • B. 

      A memory trace fades over time through disuse.

    • C. 

      Brain damage has occurred.

    • D. 

      Inappropriate retrieval cues are used.

  • 8. 
    The more meaningful the information that has been learned,
    • A. 

      The slower the rate of forgetting over time.

    • B. 

      The more likely a forgetting curve will be evident.

    • C. 

      The faster the rate of forgetting over time.

    • D. 

      The more likely forgetting will barely be noticeable.

  • 9. 
    Which of the following formulas would be used to calculate the amount of information saved from learning at some time in the past?
    • A. 

      (no. of trials for original learning) – (time for relearning) x 100 (no. of trials for original learning) 1

    • B. 

      (no. of trials for original learning) – (time for relearning) x 1 (no. of trials for original learning) 100

    • C. 

      (no. of trials for original learning) – (no. of trials for relearning) x 100 (no. of trials for original learning) 1

    • D. 

      (time for original learning) – (no. of trials for relearning) x 100 (no. of trials for original learning) 1

  • 10. 
    You have just bought a combination lock for your locker and find that you can’t remember the first three of the six numbers because you confuse them with the numbers on the combination lock you use on your bike. This memory failure is most likely due to
    • A. 

      Proactive interference.

    • B. 

      Partial retrieval failure.

    • C. 

      Retroactive interference.

    • D. 

      Partial decay of the memory trace.

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