Chapter 1: Principles Of Pest Management

11 Questions | Total Attempts: 2338

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Chapter 1: Principles Of Pest Management

Some pests can be really hard to get rid of especially when they are too many. These pests are a nuisance. For example, if they tend to attack people or keep them awake with noise. What do you know about what you notice you have a pest problem? Take up the test below designed to help you review chapter one on the principles of pest control and see how well you got to understand the topic.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    1.     What is the first thing you should do when you detect the presence of a pest?
    • A. 

      Select a control tactic

    • B. 

      Notify the Department of Agriculture

    • C. 

      Identify the organism and gain information about its biology

    • D. 

      Determine the economic threshold for control

  • 2. 
    Suppression of a pest is:     
    • A. 

      Keeping a pest from becoming a problem.

    • B. 

      Reducing pest numbers or damage to an acceptable level.

    • C. 

      Destroying an entire pest population.

    • D. 

      None of the above

  • 3. 
    How can pest identification help you develop a good pest control strategy?
  • 4. 
     What is a threshold as it relates to IPM?
    • A. 

      The level of pesticide required to control a pest.

    • B. 

      The levels of pest populations at which you take pest control action to prevent unacceptable damage or injury.

    • C. 

      A type of structure designed to be more resistant to pest invasion.

    • D. 

      The levels of heat and moisture required for a pest to survive.

  • 5. 
    Why should you consider thresholds when you develop a pest control strategy?
  • 6. 
    What is pest monitoring? a.     Watching your pesticide application kill the pest. b.    Recordkeeping of the pesticide used. c.     Checking or scouting for pests in an area to determine what pests are present, how many and how much damage they are causing. d.    Identifying the pest’s predators.
    • A. 

      Watching your pesticide application kill the pest.

    • B. 

      Record keeping of the pesticide used.

    • C. 

      Checking or scouting for pests in an area to determine what pests are present, how many and how much damage they are causing. Also called 'scouting'.

    • D. 

      Identifying the pest’s predators.

  • 7. 
    Why is pest monitoring so important to pest management?
  • 8. 
    What is integrated pest management (IPM)?. IPM involves...
    • A. 

      monitoring, identifying pests, determining threshold levels

    • B. 

      Evaluating pest management strategies

    • C. 

      Selecting pest management strategies, evaluating the results, and making adjustments

    • D. 

      Selecting the most effective pest management strategy that will do the least harm to people, non-target organism and the environment.

    • E. 

      All of the above

  • 9. 
    A pesticide was applied, but it did not control the pest. Which of the following is NOT a reason for why the pesticide application might have failed to control the pest.
    • A. 

      A pesticide may fail to manage some pests because the pests have developed resistance to the product.

    • B. 

      The pesticide was applied in the correct dosage

    • C. 

      Pesticide was not properly mixed

    • D. 

      Pest was not identified correctly

    • E. 

      Pesticide was applied to tops of leaves and the pest is located on the underside of the leaves

  • 10. 
    List the possible control tactics that may be used in an IPM strategy such as (natural controls, chemical...
  • 11. 
    Pesticides may lose their effectiveness in a specific area because.......When one pesticide is used repeatedly in the same place against the same pest, the surviving pest population may be more _____________ to the pesticide than the original population was.
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