Changing Rights And Freedoms - Indigenous Australians

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| By Misshorne
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This is a topic test for my Year 9 class. It is based on the Australian NSW Stage 5 History syllabus.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    What is the name of the first policy concerning Indigenous Australians?

    Explanation
    The first policy concerning Indigenous Australians was called "Protection." This policy was implemented in the late 19th and early 20th centuries in Australia. It aimed to control and regulate the lives of Indigenous Australians, often by removing them from their traditional lands and placing them in missions or reserves. The policy was based on the belief that Indigenous Australians were a dying race and needed to be protected and assimilated into European society. However, it resulted in the loss of cultural identity, land, and rights for Indigenous Australians.

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  • 2. 

    When did this policy take effect?

    • A.

      1780's

    • B.

      1850's

    • C.

      1880's

    • D.

      1920's

    Correct Answer
    C. 1880's
    Explanation
    The policy took effect in the 1880's.

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  • 3. 

    What is the name of the second policy concerning Indigenous Australians?

    Correct Answer
    Assimilation
    Explanation
    The second policy concerning Indigenous Australians is called Assimilation. Assimilation refers to the government's aim to assimilate Indigenous Australians into mainstream society, often through forced removal of children from their families and communities. This policy aimed to eradicate Indigenous culture, language, and traditions, and promote the adoption of Western customs and values. It was implemented from the 1930s to the 1960s and had devastating effects on Indigenous communities, leading to the loss of cultural identity and intergenerational trauma.

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  • 4. 

    What was the name of the piece of paper Indigenous Australians could apply for to change their rights under this policy?

    Correct Answer
    Certificate of Exemption
    Explanation
    The Certificate of Exemption was a piece of paper that Indigenous Australians could apply for in order to change their rights under a specific policy. This document allowed them to be exempted from certain restrictions and regulations imposed on them.

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  • 5. 

    What was the aim of the Assimilation policy?

    • A.

      To 'erase' the Indigenous culture

    • B.

      To 'erase' the Indigenous people

    • C.

      To make everyine happy

    • D.

      To stop England from getting upset

    • E.

      To help Indigenous Australians gain more rights

    Correct Answer
    A. To 'erase' the Indigenous culture
    Explanation
    The aim of the Assimilation policy was to 'erase' the Indigenous culture. This policy sought to assimilate Indigenous Australians into mainstream society by discouraging their cultural practices, languages, and traditions. It aimed to make Indigenous people adopt European customs and values, ultimately erasing their unique cultural identity.

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  • 6. 

    In which year did Indigenous Australians gain the right to vote?

    Correct Answer
    1962
    Explanation
    Indigenous Australians gained the right to vote in 1962. This marked an important milestone in their fight for equality and recognition. Prior to this, Indigenous Australians were denied the right to vote, which was a clear form of discrimination and exclusion. The granting of voting rights in 1962 was a significant step towards acknowledging the rights and agency of Indigenous Australians in the political process.

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  • 7. 

    Which year did female Indigenous Australians get the right to vote?

    Correct Answer
    1962
    Explanation
    In 1962, female Indigenous Australians were granted the right to vote. This marked an important milestone in the journey towards equal representation and recognition for Indigenous people in Australia. Prior to this, Indigenous Australians, both male and female, faced significant barriers in accessing their democratic rights. The 1962 amendment to the Commonwealth Electoral Act was a significant step towards addressing this inequality and ensuring that all Australians have the right to participate in the democratic process.

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  • 8. 

    In what year was a referendum held to change the constitution in favour of Indigenous Australians?

    Correct Answer
    1967
    Explanation
    In 1967, a referendum was held in Australia to change the constitution in favor of Indigenous Australians. This referendum sought to remove discriminatory clauses and grant the federal government the power to make laws for Indigenous people. The overwhelming majority of Australians voted in favor of the changes, with over 90% of voters supporting the referendum. This was a significant milestone in the recognition of Indigenous rights and marked an important step towards equality and inclusion in Australia.

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  • 9. 

    What were the two questions about in the referendum? 

    • A.

      Indigneous Australians were allowed to vote

    • B.

      Indigenous Australians could make their own decisons concerning their welfare

    • C.

      Indigenous Australians were counted on the census

    • D.

      The Federal government could make laws concerning Indigenous Australians

    • E.

      All Indigenous Australians were entitled to equal wage

    Correct Answer(s)
    C. Indigenous Australians were counted on the census
    D. The Federal government could make laws concerning Indigenous Australians
    Explanation
    The correct answer is that the two questions in the referendum were related to Indigenous Australians being counted on the census and the Federal government being able to make laws concerning Indigenous Australians. This means that Indigenous Australians were seeking recognition and inclusion in the national census, as well as hoping for the Federal government to have the power to create laws specifically for their benefit and welfare.

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  • 10. 

    What has to be held in order to change the Constitution?

    Correct Answer(s)
    Referendum
    Explanation
    To change the Constitution, a referendum must be held. A referendum is a direct vote in which all eligible voters can participate to approve or reject a proposed change to the Constitution. This ensures that any amendments or modifications to the Constitution are made with the consent and input of the general public, allowing for a democratic process and ensuring that the Constitution accurately reflects the will of the people.

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  • 11. 

    Name one way Indigenous Australians protested their lack of rights.

    Correct Answer(s)
    Tent Embassy
    Freedom Rides
    Protests
    Explanation
    Indigenous Australians protested their lack of rights through various means, including establishing the Tent Embassy, organizing Freedom Rides, and participating in protests. The Tent Embassy was set up in 1972 outside the Parliament House in Canberra to draw attention to land rights issues. The Freedom Rides, inspired by the US Civil Rights Movement, were bus tours conducted by university students in 1965 to expose and challenge racial discrimination against Indigenous Australians. Protests, such as marches and demonstrations, were also common methods used by Indigenous Australians to demand their rights and raise awareness about their mistreatment.

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  • 12. 

    Could Aboriginals vote in the 1967 referendum?

    • A.

      Yes

    • B.

      No

    Correct Answer
    A. Yes
    Explanation
    Aboriginals were not granted the right to vote in federal elections until the 1967 referendum. Prior to this referendum, Aboriginal people were excluded from voting in federal elections, and their rights were limited. The 1967 referendum was a significant milestone in Australian history, as it resulted in the removal of discriminatory clauses from the Australian Constitution and granted Aboriginal people the right to be counted in the national census and have their voices heard through voting.

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  • 13. 

    What happened to Aboriginl rights fter the 1967 referendum?

    • A.

      Aboriginal rights changed overnight and everyone was happy.

    • B.

      Nothing changed until 1972

    • C.

      Aboriginals gave up protesting as they had achieved their goals

    • D.

      The government went to the High court of Australian to get the referendum overturned.

    Correct Answer
    B. Nothing changed until 1972
    Explanation
    After the 1967 referendum, nothing changed until 1972. This means that despite the referendum, there were no immediate improvements or advancements in Aboriginal rights. It took several more years for any significant changes to occur.

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  • 14. 

    What doe the term Terra Nullius refer to?

    • A.

      Aboriginals could not prove ownership

    • B.

      English law was more powerful and so Europeans could gain ownership of the land

    • C.

      Aboriginal tribes traded ownership for alcohol, tobacco and weapons.

    • D.

      Land Belonging to no-one

    Correct Answer
    D. Land Belonging to no-one
    Explanation
    Terra Nullius refers to land that belongs to no one. This means that it is unoccupied and not claimed by any individual or group. The concept of Terra Nullius was used by European colonizers to justify their claims to land, particularly in the context of colonization and the displacement of indigenous peoples. It allowed them to assert ownership and control over these lands, disregarding the prior presence and rights of the Aboriginal peoples. Aboriginals not being able to prove ownership and English law being more powerful were factors that facilitated Europeans in gaining ownership, but the term itself specifically refers to land that is unclaimed.

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  • 15. 

    Missions were run by what organisation?

    Correct Answer
    Church
    Explanation
    The missions were run by the Church. This suggests that the organization responsible for running the missions mentioned in the question is the Church.

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  • 16. 

    What was the purpose of the tent embassy?

    • A.

      To embarrass the Prime Minister into giving them back their land

    • B.

      To protest their lack of voice in Australian politics

    • C.

      As they had no home, they took advantage of a public park in Canberra

    • D.

      It was a stunt for television

    • E.

      To escape the dominance of tribal elders

    Correct Answer
    B. To protest their lack of voice in Australian politics
    Explanation
    The purpose of the tent embassy was to protest their lack of voice in Australian politics. The tent embassy was established as a symbol of Aboriginal sovereignty and as a way to draw attention to the marginalization and discrimination faced by Aboriginal people in Australia. By setting up the embassy, they aimed to raise awareness about their political struggles and advocate for their rights and representation in the country's political system.

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  • 17. 

    What organisation ran reserves?

    Correct Answer
    Government
    Explanation
    The government is the organization that runs reserves. Reserves are typically managed and maintained by government agencies or departments responsible for the protection and conservation of natural resources. These reserves can include national parks, wildlife sanctuaries, forest reserves, and other protected areas. The government's role in managing reserves is to ensure the preservation of biodiversity, protect endangered species, and regulate human activities within these areas to maintain ecological balance and sustainability.

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  • 18. 

    What is the difference between the Assimilation and Integration policies?

    • A.

      Not much. Just the name.

    • B.

      The Integration policy allowed Aboriginals the rights they held before 1788

    • C.

      The Integration policy allowed Aboriginals to practice their traditional beliefs but still fit into a contemporary Australian society

    • D.

      After a change in Prime Ministers, the Integration policy allowed Aboriginals to vote, drink alcohol and live where ever they wanted.

    Correct Answer
    C. The Integration policy allowed Aboriginals to practice their traditional beliefs but still fit into a contemporary Australian society
    Explanation
    The Integration policy allowed Aboriginals to practice their traditional beliefs while also adapting to the modern Australian society. This implies that Aboriginals were given the opportunity to maintain their cultural practices and values, while also being encouraged to participate and engage in the broader Australian community. This policy aimed to strike a balance between preserving Aboriginal heritage and promoting social cohesion within the country.

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  • 19. 

    Who is the intended purpose and audience of the following poster?  

    • A.

      'White' voters in an attempt to get them to vote yes to enable Aboringals the right to vote.

    • B.

      To get Aborignals to vote for their own rights

    • C.

      To get 'White' Australians to vote for compensation for the 'Stolen Generation'

    • D.

      To get all Australians to vote yes in the 1967 referendum

    • E.

      A vote yes to remove Aborignal Australian children from their families

    Correct Answer
    D. To get all Australians to vote yes in the 1967 referendum
    Explanation
    The intended purpose and audience of the poster is to encourage all Australians to vote yes in the 1967 referendum. The poster aims to mobilize the entire population, regardless of their racial background, to support the referendum. The goal is to promote a united front in advocating for a positive outcome in the referendum.

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  • 20. 

    Look at the following Table. Which state had to make the biggest changes after the 1967 referendum?  NSW VIC SA WA NT QLD Voting rights (state) Yes Yes Yes No Yes No Marry freely Yes Yes Yes No No No Control own children Yes Yes No No No No Move freely Yes No No No No No Own property freely Yes No Yes No No No Receive award wages Yes No No No No No Alcohol allowed No No No No No No

    Correct Answer
    Qld
    Queensland
    WA
    Western Australia
    Explanation
    After the 1967 referendum, the state that had to make the biggest changes was Queensland (Qld). Prior to the referendum, Queensland had restrictions on voting rights, the ability to marry freely, control over their own children, and the ability to move and own property freely. After the referendum, these restrictions were lifted. Western Australia (WA) also had to make significant changes, particularly in terms of voting rights and the ability to marry freely. However, Queensland had more restrictions in place prior to the referendum, making it the state that had to make the biggest changes.

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