Canadian Federal Government And Constitutional Rights Unit Test

Approved & Edited by ProProfs Editorial Team
The editorial team at ProProfs Quizzes consists of a select group of subject experts, trivia writers, and quiz masters who have authored over 10,000 quizzes taken by more than 100 million users. This team includes our in-house seasoned quiz moderators and subject matter experts. Our editorial experts, spread across the world, are rigorously trained using our comprehensive guidelines to ensure that you receive the highest quality quizzes.
Learn about Our Editorial Process
| By Smartiecheez
S
Smartiecheez
Community Contributor
Quizzes Created: 10 | Total Attempts: 23,918
Questions: 26 | Attempts: 144

SettingsSettingsSettings
Canadian Federal Government And Constitutional Rights Unit Test - Quiz


This quiz if based off the info/unit of Canadian Federal Government and Constitutional Rights from the Alberta "Issue for Canadians" textbook, chapters 1 and 4. This test includes subject matters such as: the Numbered Treaties, the Constitutional Rights, First Nations, Metis, Aboriginals(First Nations, Metis and Inuit), process of passing a bill, Parliament, Francophones & Anglophones, political cartoons etc. Good Luck :)


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    Who is the "Father of Confederation"?

    Explanation
    Louis Riel is considered the "Father of Confederation" because he played a significant role in the formation of the Canadian Confederation. He was a key leader and negotiator during the Red River Resistance, which resulted in the creation of the province of Manitoba. Riel's efforts in advocating for the rights and representation of the Métis people were instrumental in shaping the early Canadian government and its policies towards Indigenous peoples. Therefore, he is widely recognized as a key figure in the Confederation of Canada.

    Rate this question:

  • 2. 

    Where was the Northwest Resistance in 1885?

    • A.

      Saskatoon, SK

    • B.

      Calgary, AB

    • C.

      Batoche, SK

    • D.

      Fort McMurray

    Correct Answer
    C. Batoche, SK
    Explanation
    The Northwest Resistance in 1885 took place in Batoche, SK. This event was a conflict between the Canadian government and the Métis people of the Northwest Territories. The Métis, led by Louis Riel, resisted the government's policies and demands, resulting in a battle at Batoche. This resistance was a significant event in Canadian history, as it highlighted the ongoing tensions between the government and Indigenous peoples, as well as the struggle for land rights and self-determination.

    Rate this question:

  • 3. 

    What was the point of Treaties 6, 7 and 8?

    • A.

      To assimilate/change Aboriginal ways

    • B.

      To give Aboriginal's rights

    • C.

      To give First Nation's reserves

    • D.

      To get rid of Aboriginal's, so the Europeans could complete the establishing the country

    Correct Answer
    A. To assimilate/change Aboriginal ways
    Explanation
    The point of Treaties 6, 7, and 8 was to assimilate or change Aboriginal ways. These treaties were signed between the Canadian government and various Indigenous groups, with the intention of encouraging Indigenous peoples to adopt European agricultural practices, settle on reserves, and abandon their traditional nomadic lifestyles. The treaties were seen as a way to exert control over Indigenous populations and facilitate European settlement and expansion in the Canadian West.

    Rate this question:

  • 4. 

    What was the point of collective rights?

    • A.

      To affirm collective identities

    • B.

      To collect these rights to establish Canada today

    • C.

      To make sure Canadians are following the Charter

    • D.

      Exclusive rights to land (reserves)

    Correct Answer
    A. To affirm collective identities
    Explanation
    The point of collective rights is to affirm collective identities. This means that these rights are meant to recognize and protect the rights and interests of specific groups or communities, such as Indigenous peoples or linguistic and cultural minorities. Collective rights acknowledge the importance of preserving and promoting the unique identities, languages, cultures, and traditions of these groups within a larger society.

    Rate this question:

  • 5. 

    What laws recognize the collective rights of the Metis?

    Correct Answer
    rights to land
    Rights to land
    education rights
    Education rights
    Explanation
    The laws that recognize the collective rights of the Metis include rights to land and education rights. These laws acknowledge and protect the Metis' rights to own and use land, as well as their rights to receive education without discrimination. These collective rights are important for the preservation and empowerment of the Metis community.

    Rate this question:

  • 6. 

    What laws recognize the collective rights of Official Language groups?

    Correct Answer
    funded schools
    Funded Schools
    funded schools for Official Language Minority groups
    funded schools for official language minority groups
    Explanation
    The laws that recognize the collective rights of Official Language groups are those that provide funding for schools catering to Official Language Minority groups. These laws ensure that these groups have access to education in their own language and promote the preservation and development of their language and culture. The inclusion of both capitalized and non-capitalized versions of "funded schools" and "official language minority groups" suggests that the answer is comprehensive and includes all variations of the correct terms.

    Rate this question:

  • 7. 

    What laws recognize the collective rights of First Nations?

    Correct Answer
    Treaty Rights
    treaty rights
    Explanation
    The collective rights of First Nations are recognized by treaty rights. These rights are established through treaties between the First Nations and the government, where certain rights and privileges are granted to the First Nations communities. Treaty rights are legally binding agreements that ensure the protection and preservation of the rights, lands, resources, and culture of the First Nations people. By recognizing and upholding these treaty rights, the government acknowledges the sovereignty and self-determination of the First Nations communities.

    Rate this question:

  • 8. 

    What is the main purpose of the Executive Branch?

    • A.

      Affirm or decline bills

    • B.

      Deal with criminals

    • C.

      Represent opinions

    • D.

      Propose laws

    Correct Answer
    D. Propose laws
    Explanation
    The main purpose of the Executive Branch is to propose laws. This branch of government is responsible for initiating the legislative process by suggesting new laws and policies to address the needs and concerns of the country. The Executive Branch, headed by the President, plays a crucial role in shaping the legislative agenda and working with Congress to pass laws that promote the well-being and progress of the nation.

    Rate this question:

  • 9. 

    What is the lasting legacy of residential schools?

    • A.

      Government made new laws

    • B.

      Government gave them normal schools

    • C.

      Government has tried to heal students who were affected

    • D.

      Last residential school closed in 1996

    Correct Answer
    C. Government has tried to heal students who were affected
    Explanation
    The lasting legacy of residential schools is that the government has made efforts to heal the students who were affected by these schools. This suggests that the government acknowledges the harm caused by residential schools and is taking steps to address the trauma and support the individuals who went through this experience. The closure of the last residential school in 1996 also signifies a significant shift in government policies and a recognition of the need for change in the education system for indigenous communities.

    Rate this question:

  • 10. 

    What is an example of Inherant Rights for the First Nation's? Choose 2.

    • A.

      Hunting

    • B.

      Land

    • C.

      Government

    • D.

      Collective Rights

    • E.

      Treaties

    • F.

      Free Taxes

    • G.

      Fishing

    • H.

      Tipis

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Hunting
    G. Fishing
    Explanation
    An example of inherent rights for the First Nation's is hunting and fishing. These activities have been traditionally practiced by Indigenous peoples for sustenance and cultural purposes. They are considered inherent rights because they are deeply tied to the cultural and historical identity of First Nations and are recognized as such in various legal frameworks and treaties. These rights acknowledge the importance of maintaining Indigenous traditions and ensuring the survival and well-being of Indigenous communities.

    Rate this question:

  • 11. 

    What had Louis Riel done for the Aboriginal peoples and Francophones?  

    • A.

      Freed them from Residential Schools

    • B.

      Rights to land (reserves)

    • C.

      Gave them Collective Rights

    • D.

      Upheld rights

    Correct Answer
    D. Upheld rights
    Explanation
    Louis Riel upheld the rights of Aboriginal peoples and Francophones. He fought for their rights and advocated for their interests, ensuring that they were protected and respected. Riel's actions and leadership were instrumental in defending their rights and preserving their cultural heritage.

    Rate this question:

  • 12. 

    What are the 3 levels of Governemnt in Canada? 

    • A.

      Senate, House of Commons, Supreme Court

    • B.

      Executive, Legislative, Judicial Branches

    • C.

      Prime Minister, Senators, Cabinet Ministers

    • D.

      Prime Minister, Premier, Mayor

    Correct Answer
    B. Executive, Legislative, Judicial Branches
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "Executive, Legislative, Judicial Branches". This answer accurately identifies the three levels of government in Canada. The executive branch is responsible for implementing and enforcing laws, the legislative branch is responsible for making laws, and the judicial branch is responsible for interpreting laws and resolving disputes.

    Rate this question:

  • 13. 

    What are inherent rights?

    • A.

      Rights to a deceased person's money/wealth

    • B.

      Rights that a person is entitled to, if part of a specific group

    • C.

      Rights to Canadians who has had their rights infringed

    • D.

      Rights Canadian's are entitled to (The Charter of Rights and Freedom)

    Correct Answer
    B. Rights that a person is entitled to, if part of a specific group
    Explanation
    Inherent rights refer to the rights that a person is entitled to if they are part of a specific group. These rights are considered to be inherent or natural to individuals based on their membership in a particular group, such as citizenship, race, gender, or religion. These rights are not granted by any external authority but are believed to be fundamental and essential to human beings by virtue of their existence in that specific group.

    Rate this question:

  • 14. 

    The Indian Act was an example of___________.

    • A.

      The Charter

    • B.

      Reserves

    • C.

      Assimilation

    • D.

      Recognition of First Nation peoples

    Correct Answer
    C. Assimilation
    Explanation
    The Indian Act was an example of assimilation. This legislation, enacted in Canada in 1876, aimed to assimilate Indigenous peoples into mainstream Canadian society by imposing strict regulations on their lives, such as controlling their land, banning cultural practices, and forcing Indigenous children to attend residential schools. The Indian Act sought to eradicate Indigenous cultures, languages, and traditions, and assimilate them into Western ways of life. This policy of assimilation was a significant part of the colonial history of Canada and had long-lasting negative impacts on Indigenous communities.

    Rate this question:

  • 15. 

    Manitoba is a bilingual province.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    B. False
    Explanation
    Manitoba is not a bilingual province. While both English and French are recognized as official languages in Canada, Manitoba is not officially designated as a bilingual province. The province does have a significant French-speaking population and offers French-language services in certain areas, but it does not have the same level of bilingualism as provinces like New Brunswick or Quebec.

    Rate this question:

  • 16. 

    What is the main role of the Legislative Branch?

    • A.

      Propose laws

    • B.

      Pass or decline laws

    • C.

      To make sure laws are enforced

    • D.

      Deal with youth criminals

    Correct Answer
    B. Pass or decline laws
    Explanation
    The main role of the Legislative Branch is to pass or decline laws. This branch of government is responsible for creating, debating, and voting on proposed laws. They have the power to introduce new legislation, amend existing laws, and determine whether a law should be enacted or rejected. By passing or declining laws, the Legislative Branch plays a crucial role in shaping the legal framework of a country and ensuring that the laws align with the needs and values of the society they represent.

    Rate this question:

  • 17. 

    How many years does a Governor General serve for? 

    Correct Answer
    5
    five
    Five
    Explanation
    A Governor General serves for a period of five years.

    Rate this question:

  • 18. 

    The Senate is the lower house of parliament.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    B. False
    Explanation
    The given statement is incorrect. The Senate is actually the upper house of parliament, not the lower house. In many countries, including the United States, the Senate is considered the upper chamber of the legislative branch, while the lower house is typically called the House of Representatives or something similar.

    Rate this question:

  • 19. 

    Where are money issues dealt with?

    • A.

      Supreme Court

    • B.

      Prime Minister

    • C.

      The Senate

    • D.

      House of Commons

    Correct Answer
    D. House of Commons
    Explanation
    Money issues are dealt with in the House of Commons. The House of Commons is the lower house of the Parliament in countries like the United Kingdom and Canada. It is responsible for discussing and passing laws, including those related to financial matters such as budgets and taxation. The House of Commons is where elected representatives, known as Members of Parliament, debate and make decisions on various issues, including those related to money and the economy.

    Rate this question:

  • 20. 

    How are each regions equally represented in the Senate?

    Correct Answer
    rep by p.o.p
    reputation by population
    Reputation by Population
    Explanation
    The regions are equally represented in the Senate based on their population. This means that each region's representation is determined by the number of people living in that region. This ensures that larger regions with higher populations have more representation, while smaller regions with lower populations have proportionally less representation. By using the "rep by p.o.p" or "reputation by population" principle, the Senate aims to ensure that all regions have a fair and equal say in the decision-making process.

    Rate this question:

  • 21. 

    How many members are in the Senate?

    Correct Answer
    105
    one hundred and five
    Explanation
    The Senate has a total of 105 members. This includes both elected and appointed members. Therefore, the correct answer is 105 or one hundred and five.

    Rate this question:

  • 22. 

    The Senate is a reflection of what?

    Correct Answer
    Multicultural Society
    multicultural society
    Explanation
    The Senate is a reflection of a multicultural society. This means that the Senate consists of individuals from diverse cultural backgrounds, representing the various ethnic, racial, and religious groups within a society. The inclusion of individuals from different cultures in the Senate ensures that a wide range of perspectives and experiences are considered when making decisions and creating policies that affect the entire society. This promotes inclusivity, diversity, and equal representation within the political system.

    Rate this question:

  • 23. 

    When can a Senator resign?

    Correct Answer
    seventy five
    75
  • 24. 

    What does the Mace represent?

    • A.

      Authority of the sovereign

    • B.

      Authority of government

    • C.

      Symbol of respect

    • D.

      Symbol of Parliament

    Correct Answer
    A. Authority of the sovereign
    Explanation
    The Mace represents the authority of the sovereign. In parliamentary systems, the Mace is a symbol of the monarch's authority and presence in the legislative process. It is often placed in the center of the parliamentary chamber during sessions to symbolize the authority and power of the sovereign.

    Rate this question:

  • 25. 

    What does the Whip do?

    • A.

      Research for Ministers

    • B.

      Work closely with the Leader of the Opposition

    • C.

      Take notes in meetings and debates

    • D.

      Insure discipline

    Correct Answer
    D. Insure discipline
    Explanation
    The Whip is responsible for ensuring discipline within a political party. They make sure that party members attend important meetings and debates, and follow the party's instructions and policies. They also keep track of party members' voting patterns and make sure they vote in line with the party's stance. This helps maintain party unity and ensures that party members are accountable to the party's leadership.

    Rate this question:

  • 26. 

    How many readings does a bill need?

    Correct Answer
    3
    three
    Explanation
    A bill needs three readings. This is the standard procedure followed in many legislative bodies. The first reading is when the bill is introduced and its title and main provisions are read out. The second reading involves a detailed discussion and debate on the bill's content. The third reading is the final stage where the bill is voted on by the members and if approved, it moves forward in the legislative process. The use of the word "three" in the answer reinforces the fact that a bill requires three readings.

    Rate this question:

Quiz Review Timeline +

Our quizzes are rigorously reviewed, monitored and continuously updated by our expert board to maintain accuracy, relevance, and timeliness.

  • Current Version
  • Mar 28, 2024
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team
  • Dec 18, 2011
    Quiz Created by
    Smartiecheez
Back to Top Back to top
Advertisement
×

Wait!
Here's an interesting quiz for you.

We have other quizzes matching your interest.